Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
7 Lichen Planus Clinical Trials Near Me
Top Hospitals for Lichen Planus Clinical Trials
Image of Delricht Research - Touro Medical Center in Louisiana.
Delricht Research - Touro Medical Center
New Orleans
1Active Trials
1All Time Trials for Lichen Planus
2022First Lichen Planus Trial
Image of Clinohio Research Services in Ohio.
Clinohio Research Services
Columbus
1Active Trials
1All Time Trials for Lichen Planus
2022First Lichen Planus Trial
Top Cities for Lichen Planus Clinical Trials
Image of New Orleans in Louisiana.
New Orleans
1Active Trials
Delricht Research - Touro Medical CenterTop Active Site
Image of Columbus in Ohio.
Columbus
1Active Trials
Clinohio Research ServicesTop Active Site
Lichen Planus Clinical Trials by Phase of Trial
Phase < 1 Lichen Planus Clinical Trials
1Active Lichen Planus Clinical Trials
1Number of Unique Treatments
1Number of Active Locations
Lichen Planus Clinical Trials by Age Group
Most Recent Lichen Planus Clinical Trials
Top Treatments for Lichen Planus Clinical Trials
Treatment Name
Active Lichen Planus Clinical Trials
All Time Trials for Lichen Planus
First Recorded Lichen Planus Trial
Ruxolitinib cream
1
1
2022
Baricitinib (LY3009104)
1
1
2022
Ixekizumab Auto-Injector
1
1
2021
dexamethasone 0.5mg/5ml solution in Mucolox™
1
1
2020
Tranexamic acid tablets
1
1
2020

What are Lichen Planus Clinical Trials?

Lichen planus (LP) is a long-term condition that affects the skin, scalp, nails, and mucous membranes, causing swelling and irritation. Common symptoms in typical locations on the body are given below:

  • Purplish, flat bumps and lesions on the skin that can turn into itchy blisters. On darker skin tones, these bumps can appear grayish.
  • Color change on the scalp and hair loss
  • Damage and nail loss
  • White lacy patches that can develop into painful sores in mucous membranes of the skin and vagina

Lichen planus is not contagious, not a form of cancer, and does not occur due to bad hygiene. It can affect anyone but is not life-threatening. Mild cases can be managed at home without hospitalization. However, if left untreated, it can cause serious complications, such as an increase in the chances of oral cancer, leading to hearing loss (if in the ear canal) and sexual dysfunction (if in the vulva or vagina).

Why Study Lichen Planus Through Clinical Trials?

Lichen planus lesions can present eleven known forms with varying appearances and have been seen to occur with other syndromes. It is believed to affect approximately 1% of the US population. The reason it occurs is still unknown, and there is no cure.

Clinical trials have helped isolate possible causes such as autoimmune responses, allergic reactions, and even infections from viruses like the hepatitis C virus. However, there still isn't enough to verify these causes. Further research is needed to discover the cause and develop treatment plans to eradicate the symptoms quickly.

What Are The Types of Treatments Available For Lichen Planus?

In most cases, lichen planus (LP) will resolve on its own within a year, especially in the case of mild LP, so medication is not required. However, medication can provide symptomatic relief for issues like itching. For patients that have LP lesions on their skin, treatment can improve the skin’s appearance by healing the lesions quicker.

Topical steroids are generally prescribed, and doctors may inject corticosteroids directly into the bumps to reduce inflammation and discoloration. For oral LP, steroid inhalant powders or pastes are used as they are easier to apply inside the mouth, while hydrocortisone foams are recommended for vaginal LP. Antihistamines, broad-spectrum antibiotics, hydroxychloroquine, retinoids, and antifungal medications may also be used for the treatment depending on the presentation of symptoms.

What are Some Notable Breakthroughs in Lichen Planus Clinical Trials?

2013: An ongoing clinical trial studying the use of apremilast to treat lichen planus, a medication used to treat psoriasis. Initial findings suggest apremilast is effective; however, further study is needed with a larger sample size to establish statistical significance.

2020: An Australian study found that oral LP can increase the risk for oral cancer. This relation is why doctors recommend that people with oral LP should check for signs of malignancy every 6 – 12 months and refrain from smoking and alcohol drinking, which are known to increase the risk of oral cancer.

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 25th, 2021

Last Reviewed: November 23rd, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.

References1 Molinar VE, Taylor SC, Pandya AG. What's new in objective assessment and treatment of facial hyperpigmentation? Dermatol Clin. 2014 Apr;32(2):123-35. doi: 10.1016/j.det.2013.12.008. Review. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/246799992 Kim SJ, Park JY, Shibata T, Fujiwara R, Kang HY. Efficacy and possible mechanisms of topical tranexamic acid in melasma. Clin Exp Dermatol. 2016 Jul;41(5):480-5. doi: 10.1111/ced.12835. Epub 2016 May 2. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/271352823 Monteiro BV, Pereira Jdos S, Nonaka CF, Godoy GP, da Silveira ÉJ, Miguel MC. Immunoexpression of Th17-related cytokines in oral lichen planus. Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol. 2015 Jul;23(6):409-15. doi: 10.1097/PAI.0000000000000096. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/253569454 Chen X, Liu Z, Yue Q. The expression of TNF-alpha and ICAM-1 in lesions of lichen planus and its implication. J Huazhong Univ Sci Technolog Med Sci. 2007 Dec;27(6):739-41. doi: 10.1007/s11596-007-0632-x. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/182317585 Bolognia JL, Jorizzo JL, Rapini RP. Dermatology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier: 2008. 6 Bala HR, Lee S, Wong C, Pandya AG, Rodrigues M. Oral Tranexamic Acid for the Treatment of Melasma: A Review. Dermatol Surg. 2018 Jun;44(6):814-825. doi: 10.1097/DSS.0000000000001518. Review. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/296770157 Cribier B, Frances C, Chosidow O. Treatment of lichen planus. An evidence-based medicine analysis of efficacy. Arch Dermatol. 1998 Dec;134(12):1521-30. Review. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/98751898 Paul J, Foss CE, Hirano SA, Cunningham TD, Pariser DM. An open-label pilot study of apremilast for the treatment of moderate to severe lichen planus: a case series. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013 Feb;68(2):255-61. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2012.07.014. Epub 2012 Aug 19. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/229101049 Lee HC, Thng TG, Goh CL. Oral tranexamic acid (TA) in the treatment of melasma: A retrospective analysis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2016 Aug;75(2):385-92. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2016.03.001. Epub 2016 May 17. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2720675810 Boyd AS, Neldner KH. Lichen planus. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1991 Oct;25(4):593-619. Review. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1791218