Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
Image of National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, United States.
Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
2
Safety

Floreo VR Groupfor Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

< 18
All Sexes
Background: Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often have cognitive problems. It may be hard for them to control their behaviors, concentrate for long periods, or make decisions. This can affect their education, friendships, and daily life. A virtual reality-based game may help improve cognitive skills in children with ADHD. It may also help change how the brain functions. Objective: To see if a virtual reality-based game helps improve thinking skills and brain function in children with ADHD. Eligibility: Children aged 7 to 14 years with ADHD. Design: Participants will be screened. Their physical and mental health, medical and family history, and intellectual and emotional development will be evaluated. They will have tests of their mood, memory, attention, thinking, and behavior. Blood or saliva may be collected. Participants may have an MRI scan of the brain. Participants will receive a set of virtual reality games. The set includes 6 different games played by placing a smartphone inside a virtual reality headset. The participant will play a game for 20 minutes at least 3 days a week for 4 to 6 weeks. The parent or caregiver will start each game using a tablet. Each of the 6 games is designed to help the participant practice specific cognitive skills. These include inhibition control, processing speed, and sustained attention. Participants will have interviews each week. They will answer questions about motion sickness, eye strain, or headache. Blood or saliva tests and the MRI may be repeated after the last game. A 6-month follow-up visit can be by phone or telehealth. ...
Phase 2
Waitlist Available
National Institutes of Health Clinical CenterWallace P Shaw, M.D.
Image of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, United States.
Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety

Mindfulness Treatmentfor Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

< 18
All Sexes
It is estimated that 25-40% of youth with ADHD have co-occurring cognitive disengagement syndrome (CDS; previously sluggish cognitive tempo), a set of behavioral symptoms characterized by excessive daydreaming, slowed thinking, and mental confusion and fogginess. A growing body of research demonstrates CDS to be associated with functional impairment above and beyond that which can be accounted for by ADHD severity. However, no treatment currently exists that directly targets CDS symptoms. This is a critical clinical and scientific gap, leaving youth with ADHD and co-occurring CDS at risk for experiencing negative immediate and long-term outcomes. In considering intervention approaches, mindfulness meditation involves regular practice to catch oneself when the mind wanders, and may thus an ideal intervention for youth with CDS. However, mindfulness interventions, including the Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPs) for ADHD, have never been tested in adolescents with ADHD and co-occurring CDS specifically. This study will recruit up to 15 adolescents with ADHD and co-occurring CDS symptoms to enroll in an open trial of MAPs to evaluate its feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy. Findings will provide key pilot data regarding treatment of CDS in adolescents with ADHD.
Recruiting
Has No Placebo
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Image of Ontario Institute of Studies in Education (OISE) at The University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada.
Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety

30 Minute Trainingfor Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

18 - 65
All Sexes
The overall objective of the current study is to determine whether computerized Working Memory (WM) training will enhance WM capacity in college students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). There are also four additional objectives. The first is to investigate whether the program's efficacy is impacted by the duration of the daily training sessions. The second is to determine whether improvements in WM will generalize to secondary outcome tasks, such as inhibitory control and planning. The third objective is to examine whether WM training will also ameliorate ADHD symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity. The last objective is to investigate whether improvements will be maintained at a two month follow-up period. The investigators will also be assessing healthy control participants,who will not be receiving treatment, but will be used as a basis of comparison with the ADHD participants, It is expected that the computerized WM training program will enhance WM capacity in college students with ADHD. In addition, it is believed that these increases in WM capacity will also lead to improvements in other executive functions. It is also hypothesized that WM training will lead to a reduction in ADHD symptomology. Lastly, these improvements should be maintained at three month follow-up.
Phase 1
Waitlist Available
Ontario Institute of Studies in Education (OISE) at The University of TorontoRosemary Tannock, Ph.D.
Image of University of Virginia in Charlottesville, United States.
Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety

Combinedfor Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

< 18
All Sexes
Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) comprise about 5-10% of the elementary school-age population. One place where children with ADHD have great difficulty is in being accepted by peers and in making friends. It has unfortunately been very difficult for the field to find good treatments for peer relationship problems for this population. Even when children with ADHD do improve their behavior, it is common that peers do not seem to like the child with ADHD any better. This may happen because children often have negative reputations with their classmates that are hard to change. That is, once a class of children get the impression that one child is disliked or the social outcast, even if that child's ADHD symptoms get better, the peer group may not notice any of these improvements. It is hypothesized that the elementary school teacher may be able to help peers notice positive behavior changes in children with ADHD when they do occur. This clinical trial will design and pilot-test an intervention that would train teachers in classroom practices to reduce the peer rejection of students with ADHD. The pilot test will be conducted in a summer program created to be similar to a regular school classroom in structure. If the treatment seems to succeed in the summer program, then it will be tried in regular classrooms in a future study.
Waitlist Available
Has No Placebo
University of VirginiaAmori Y Mikami, PhD
25 Adhd Clinical Trials Near Me
Top Hospitals for Adhd Clinical Trials
Image of Massachusetts General Hospital in Massachusetts.
Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston
6Active Trials
32All Time Trials for Adhd
2001First Adhd Trial
Image of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in Ohio.
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Cincinnati
4Active Trials
17All Time Trials for Adhd
2003First Adhd Trial
Top Cities for Adhd Clinical Trials
Image of Cincinnati in Ohio.
Cincinnati
8Active Trials
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical CenterTop Active Site
Image of Las Vegas in Nevada.
Las Vegas
8Active Trials
Center for Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Inc.Top Active Site
Adhd Clinical Trials by Phase of Trial
Phase < 1 Adhd Clinical Trials
1Active Adhd Clinical Trials
1Number of Unique Treatments
1Number of Active Locations
Mindfulness-Based ADHD Treatment for Children
Adhd Clinical Trials by Age Group
< 18 Adhd Clinical Trials
35Active Adhd Clinical Trials
Floreo VR groupMindfulness TreatmentAcademic Accommodations8 weeks of home based use.Behavioral Parenting InterventionCentanafadine HydrochlorideSummer STRIPESTranscranial Photobiomodulation
Top Treatments for Adhd Clinical Trials
Treatment Name
Active Adhd Clinical Trials
All Time Trials for Adhd
First Recorded Adhd Trial
SMS Intervention
3
3
2016
Methylphenidate
2
39
1998
Behavioral Parent Training
2
2
2006
Floreo VR group
1
1
2022
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy delivered in a group format
1
1
2022
Recently Completed Studies with FDA Approved Treatments for Adhd
Treatment
Year
Sponsor
Adhansia XR
2020
Purdue Pharma LP

What is ADHD?

Attention deficit hypersensitivity disorder, also known as ADHD, is a common neurodevelopmental disorder that develops in children. The disorder occurs in 5.9% of preadolescents and 2.9% of adults. People with ADHD exhibit signs of inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and impulsivity during their childhood and, in some cases, even in their adulthood. Its legitimate cause is unknown—however, most cases of ADHD list genetics and environmental factors as its main cause. Today, more findings and developments are being made by world-renowned medical experts in ADHD clinical trials.

Why is ADHD being studied in clinical trials?

The exact cause of ADHD is still unknown. Even though ADHD is extensively researched, much is yet to be discovered. Today, many medications and treatments are being used in clinical trials that could potentially show valuable results.

How do ADHD clinical trials work?

Each ADHD clinical trial has different processes and results. It is formed in phases and may span over a long period of time. ADHD clinical trials typically test the effectiveness of medication or some form of treatment on its participants. One such example is the study entitled “Multimodal Brain Imaging of the Neural Effects of Methylphenidate in Patients With ADHD”, which is a clinical trial that is presently being researched in Baltimore, Maryland.

Multimodal Brain Imaging of the Neural Effects of Methylphenidate in Patients With ADHD is a study from the John Hopkins School of Medicine that seeks to determine whether methylphenidate can alter the brain activity of people diagnosed with ADHD. The study tests the combination of methylphenidate and placebo in adults with ADHD while calculating the changes in task-related neural activity and brain glutamate levels. Its goal is to advance neuroimaging biomarkers in predicting methylphenidate treatment response, leading to new novel pharmacological treatments.

A total of thirty participants are intended to participate in the study. The participants will be divided into two treatment groups: the experimental treatment group or the methylphenidate first group and the non-treatment group or the placebo first group. Each participant will be given one oral dose of methylphenidate or placebo, depending on which treatment group they belong to. After dose intake, the participants will be subjected to neuropsychological testing and brain scans. The results of this study will lead to developments in pharmacological treatments for ADHD If deemed successful.

What are some key breakthrough clinical trials involving ADHD?

It has taken many years for ADHD to become recognized, studied, and properly understood. As of late, there have been multiple ADHD clinical trials that have propagated efficient results, namely:

2005: Therapeutic Response - The results of this study show that vigorous amounts of methylphenidate are effective in adults with ADHD. Response to the methylphenidate treatment was higher than that of the placebo treatment and was unharmful to the participants.

2006: Adderall Efficacy - The results of this study show that a daily dose of 10-40mg/d of mixed amphetamine salts extended-release (MAS XR) to adolescents with ADHD have a considerable development in their symptoms compared to placebo.

Who are the key opinion leaders on ADHD clinical trial research?

Stephen Faraone, Ph.D., is a senior investigator of psychiatry from Mass General Research Institute, a research staff of psychiatry from Massachusetts General Hospital, and a part-time lecturer on psychology in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical school. He was the 2nd most-cited author of ADHD in 2005 and has written over 800 books, editorials, and journal articles.

Philip Asherson, Ph.D., is an emeritus professor of neurodevelopmental psychiatry at King’s College London. His research mainly focuses on ADHD, clinical and genetic studies of ADHD, neurodevelopmental disorders, and neuropsychiatric disorders.

Top Hospitals For ADHD Clinical Trials

Power’s data revealed that the top hospital actively performing ADHD clinical trials is Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. It recorded its first clinical trial in 2001, and it has since continued to perform clinical trials. Presently, there are six trials that are active and ongoing, which are: Solriamfetol 150 MG for Attention Deficit Disorder, SMS Intervention for Attention Deficit Disorder, SMS Intervention for Attention Deficit Disorder, SMS Intervention for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), MRI for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Transcranial Photobiomodulation for Autism, Early Infantile.

Massachusetts General Hospital is known for being the third oldest general hospital in the United States, having been built in 1811. The U.S. News & World Report has continuously ranked Massachusetts General Hospital among the top five hospitals in the United States. The hospital has 25,000 employees, which include 5,000 registered nurses, 4,500 allied health workers, 2,400 physicians, and 2,300 research scientists.

ADHD clinical trials are also being actively conducted at the following hospitals: The Center for Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Inc. in Las Vegas, Nevada, The Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, The Seattle Children's Hospital in Seattle, Washington, and MindPath Care Centers in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Top Treatments for ADHD Clinical Trials

The top treatment for ADHD clinical trials is short message service (SMS) intervention. It was first recorded in 2016. There are three active ADHD trials currently being performed, which are: SMS Intervention for Attention Deficit Disorder, SMS Intervention for Attention Deficit Disorder, and SMS Intervention for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

Top treatments for ADHD clinical trials include methylphenidate, AKL-T01, weight-based low-dose centanafadine capsules, and CLS-R-Fuerte.

Top Cities for ADHD Clinical Trials

Las Vegas, located in Nevada, is the top city for ADHD clinical trials. Among the top cities for ADHD clinical trials are Cincinnati, New York, Boston, and Seattle. Eight clinical trials are actively being performed at the Center for Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Inc. These trials are SPN-812 for Hyperkinesis, SPN-812 for Hyperkinesis, AKL-T01 for Attention Deficit Disorder, Open-Label Treatment for Attention Deficit Disorder, 15 mg Aptensio XR for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), ADHD Therapy for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), AKL-T01 for Attention Deficit Disorder, Guanfacine hydrochloride (TAK-503) for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

Which phases are most popular for ADHD clinical trials?

The most popular phase for ADHD clinical trials is Phase < 1. Among the most popular phases are Phase 1, Phase 1 and 2, Phase 2, Phase 2 and 3, Phase 3, and Phase 4. You can see more clinical trials in their different Phases of development here.

How many ADHD clinical trials are open to youth and/or seniors?

There are a total of seventy-two ADHD clinical trials that are available to youth and/or seniors. Thirty-six active trials are available to people of the age of eighteen or under. Ten active trials are available to people aged eighteen or older. Sixteen active trials are available to participants that are within the age of eighteen and sixty-five. Six active trials are available to people that are aged under sixty-five. And only four active trials are open to participants of any age.

References:

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/facts.html#ref

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT04781972

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15737659/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16678648/

https://researchers.mgh.harvard.edu/profile/14559688/Stephen-Faraone

https://www.kcl.ac.uk/people/philip-asherson

https://hms.harvard.edu/affiliates/massachusetts-general-hospital

https://www.massgeneral.org/quality-and-safety/about

http://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/adhd

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 28th, 2021

Last Reviewed: October 30th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.

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