Tinnitus Clinical Trials

Tinnitus studies recruiting patients for novel treatments. Filter by phase, distance, and inclusion criteria to find your perfect tinnitus clinical trial.

Filter Clinical TrialsFilter Clinical Trials

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What is the latest treatment for tinnitus?

The latest treatment for tinnitus is a device developed by Neuromod Devices branded as Lenire. It consists of a set of wireless Bluetooth headphones that produce a sequence of audio tones combined with wideband noise to both ears. In addition, it delivers electrical stimulation pulses to 32 electrodes on the tip of the tongue. Clinical trials make discovering new treatments for tinnitus possible. If you are looking to join a tinnitus clinical trial, Power can help you search recent trials by condition, treatment, or location.

Is there research for a cure for tinnitus?

While cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and other psychological interventions can help lessen the distress caused by tinnitus, there is currently no drug or medical device shown to reliably improve the condition. However, researchers are using clinical trials to get closer to finding a cure for tinnitus. You can find the most recent tinnitus clinical trials by using Power, which allows you to search trials tailored to your condition, location, and ideal treatment.

Has the FDA approved anything for tinnitus?

Currently, there are no drugs approved by the FDA for treating tinnitus. However, antidepressant and antianxiety medications are sometimes prescribed to patients with tinnitus, but the benefits are limited. Clinical trials help researchers discover potential treatments for tinnitus. Power makes it easy to find tinnitus clinical trials tailored to your condition, treatment, or location.

Can ear drops help tinnitus?

Ear drops can help with tinnitus if the tinnitus is caused by an underlying health condition. Treating the underlying health condition may help reduce or stop the tinnitus. For example, if the tinnitus is caused by a buildup of earwax, ear drops or ear irrigation may help. To find active tinnitus clinical trials in your area, you can use Power to search by condition, treatment, or location.

When should I worry about tinnitus?

While most cases of tinnitus come and go without the need for medical treatment, you may need to see a doctor if it occurs with other symptoms, does not improve or go away, or is only in one ear. Your doctor can teach you how to live with the problem and make sure there isn't a more serious problem that is causing your symptoms. If you are looking to join a tinnitus clinical trial, Power can help you search recent trials by condition, treatment, or location.

Is there an over the counter medicine for tinnitus?

While there are several over the counter drugs and supplements that misleadingly market themselves as "tinnitus remedies," there is currently no reliable scientific evidence that these products are effective treatments for tinnitus. These products often have anecdotal success stories behind them, but any reported improvements are most likely due to the placebo effect. You can find the most recent tinnitus clinical trials by using Power, which allows you to search trials tailored to your condition, location, and ideal treatment.

Can zinc tablets help tinnitus?

Recent studies have suggested that oral zinc supplementation may be effective for treating tinnitus. This is due to zinc playing a role in cochlear physiology and the synapses of the auditory system, making it a plausible mechanism of action for treatment of tinnitus. Power makes it easy to find tinnitus clinical trials tailored to your condition, treatment, or location.

Does ginkgo biloba help tinnitus?

Studies have shown that ginkgo biloba, a monoamine-oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), can effectively improve tinnitus caused by ischemia. Ischemia is a condition where blood flow is constricted or reduced in one part of the body. Ginkgo biloba has antiplatelet and vascular modulator effects, meaning that it can improve blood flow and regulate vascular tone. To find active tinnitus clinical trials in your area, you can use Power to search by condition, treatment, or location.

How do you stop tinnitus from getting worse?

The best ways to prevent tinnitus from getting worse is to relax through deep breathing or yoga, finding ways to improve your sleep such as establishing a bedtime routine and reducing caffeine, and avoiding things that worsen tinnitus such as stress or loud background noises. There are also several self-help books or techniques available to help you cope with tinnitus, as well as support groups where you can talk to other people who also live with the condition. If you are looking to join a tinnitus clinical trial, Power can help you search recent trials by condition, treatment, or location.

Is tinnitus serious?

Unless the tinnitus is caused by other conditions that require medical attention, tinnitus is usually not a medically serious condition. However, it can still have negative impacts on people from the stress and anxiety that it causes. You can find the most recent tinnitus clinical trials by using Power, which allows you to search trials tailored to your condition, location, and ideal treatment.

What percentage of seniors have tinnitus?

Studies suggest that about 30% of seniors experience symptoms of tinnitus. This is because the primary cause of tinnitus is hearing loss, and age-related hearing loss tends to worsen after the age of 60. While anyone can develop tinnitus at any time, this makes seniors more vulnerable to acquiring the condition. Power makes it easy to find tinnitus clinical trials tailored to your condition, treatment, or location.

Will tinnitus ever stop?

There is currently no cure for tinnitus, but the condition usually becomes less noticeable and more manageable over time. The symptoms of tinnitus can be eased by learning more about the condition, as well as learning methods for tuning out noise and minimizing its impact. To find active tinnitus clinical trials in your area, you can use Power to search by condition, treatment, or location.

What triggers tinnitus attacks?

Tinnitus is often triggered by an illness or condition such as an ear infection or high blood pressure. Another common cause is a hearing injury caused by exposure to loud noise. However, in most cases, the cause of tinnitus is unknown. If you are looking to join a tinnitus clinical trial, Power can help you search recent trials by condition, treatment, or location.

Is tinnitus linked to depression?

Those suffering from severe tinnitus can also experience depression, stress, anxiety, and fatigue. These symptoms can create a vicious cycle that ends up making the symptoms worse. Those experiencing anxiety, depression, or sleep problems caused by tinnitus should seek help from a health professional to reduce their symptoms. You can find the most recent tinnitus clinical trials by using Power, which allows you to search trials tailored to your condition, location, and ideal treatment.

Can losing weight stop tinnitus?

While there is little evidence directly connecting exercise or specific foods to improved tinnitus symptoms, there is no doubt that a healthy diet and regular physical activity has many beneficial effects on the body, some of which may lessen the impact of tinnitus. Regular exercise also improves emotional well-being and reduces stress, both of which can minimize the mental burden of tinnitus. Power makes it easy to find tinnitus clinical trials tailored to your condition, treatment, or location.

What does tinnitus do to your brain?

Chronic tinnitus has recently been associated with changes in certain networks of the brain, causing the brain to stay more at attention and less at rest. This is an important development that validates the experiences of those living with the condition and provides hope for future treatment options. These developments would not be possible without the use of clinical trials to expand on current research. To find active tinnitus clinical trials in your area, you can use Power to search by condition, treatment, or location.

What foods to avoid if you have tinnitus?

The number one food those with tinnitus should avoid is salt. Sodium is related to higher blood pressure levels, which in turn can affect blood flow to the ears and activate tinnitus. Other foods to avoid include alcohol, sweets, caffeine, and fast food. If you are looking to join a tinnitus clinical trial, Power can help you search recent trials by condition, treatment, or location.

Should I see a neurologist for tinnitus?

If you have headaches when you experience tinnitus or have sensitivity to certain sounds, you may benefit from consulting with a neurologist. Neurologists specialize in disorders related to the brain, spinal cord, and nerves, and usually work in private practices, medical centers, or hospitals. You can find the most recent tinnitus clinical trials by using Power, which allows you to search trials tailored to your condition, location, and ideal treatment.

Do any tinnitus treatments work?

Currently, there is no scientifically proven cure for most cases of chronic tinnitus. However, there are excellent treatments available that help tinnitus patients manage their condition. These treatments reduce the intensity, omnipresence, and burden of tinnitus. While these treatments are not "cures," they can help tinnitus patients live more fulfilling and productive lives. Power makes it easy to find tinnitus clinical trials tailored to your condition, treatment, or location.

What drugs worsen tinnitus?

Drugs known to cause tinnitus symptoms include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), certain antibiotics, certain cancer medications, diuretics, and quinine-based medications. However, for most drugs tinnitus is an acute and short-lived side effect. When the patient stops taking the medication, the tinnitus symptoms usually recede. To find active tinnitus clinical trials in your area, you can use Power to search by condition, treatment, or location.