Family-based Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment for Leukemia, Lymphoid

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
Leukemia, Lymphoid+3 More
Family-based Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment - Behavioral
Eligibility
Any Age
All Sexes
What conditions do you have?
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Study Summary

A single-arm, non-randomized four-month trial of the adapted family-based behavioral weight loss treatment (FBT) intervention will be conducted to evaluate its acceptability, feasibility, and preliminary indications of efficacy including measures of relative weight change and associated secondary outcomes (e.g., weight related health behaviors, health related quality of life), among 40 childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors and their families.

Eligible Conditions

  • Leukemia, Lymphoid
  • Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Leukemia, Lymphoid

Study Objectives

4 Primary · 5 Secondary · Reporting Duration: At completion of intervention (estimated to be at 4 months)

Month 4
Acceptability of Family-Based Behavioral Treatment as measured by The Acceptability of Intervention Measure (AIM)
Acceptability of Family-Based Behavioral Treatment as measured by the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8)
Appropriateness of Family-Based Behavioral Treatment as measured by Intervention Appropriateness Measure (IAM)
Feasibility of Family-Based Behavioral Treatment as measured by Feasibility of Intervention Measure (FIM)
Month 12
Change in dietary intake
Change in physical activity as measured by HBSC adaptation
Change in physical activity as measured by International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) (short)
Change in relative height (children only)
Change in relative weight

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Leukemia, Lymphoid

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Children: Family-based Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment (FBT)
1 of 2
Caregivers: Family-based Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment (FBT)
1 of 2
Experimental Treatment

80 Total Participants · 2 Treatment Groups

Primary Treatment: Family-based Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment · No Placebo Group · N/A

Children: Family-based Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment (FBT)
Behavioral
Experimental Group · 1 Intervention: Family-based Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment · Intervention Types: Behavioral
Caregivers: Family-based Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment (FBT)
Behavioral
Experimental Group · 1 Intervention: Family-based Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment · Intervention Types: Behavioral

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: at completion of intervention (estimated to be at 4 months)
Closest Location: Washington University School of Medicine · Saint Louis, MO
Photo of washington university school of medicine  1Photo of washington university school of medicine  2Photo of washington university school of medicine  3
2004First Recorded Clinical Trial
65 TrialsResearching Leukemia, Lymphoid
1465 CompletedClinical Trials

Eligibility Criteria

Age Any Age · All Participants · 7 Total Inclusion Criteria

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Children must be between ages of 5-18.\n
Child must be overweight or obese (defined as a BMI greater than the 85th percentile for their age and sex).
You have been diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
You are a child who is 6 months or older and in remission from cancer.
You must be able to perform some level of exercise.

About The Reviewer

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 9th, 2021

Last Reviewed: August 12th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.