Conventional intensive functional rehabilitation + Workstations for Stroke

Phase-Based Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
CIUSSS centre-sud-de-l'ile-de-Montréal, Montréal, Canada
Stroke
Conventional intensive functional rehabilitation + Workstations - Device
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Stroke

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether a set of activities can improve mobility in people with stroke.

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Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Estimate

1 of 3

Compared to trials

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Conventional intensive functional rehabilitation + Workstations will improve 1 primary outcome and 3 secondary outcomes in patients with Stroke. Measurement will happen over the course of In the third or fourth week of rehabilitation.

End-measure, at the end of rehabilitation
Balance capacities
Gait speed
Gross manual dexterity
In the third or fourth week of rehabilitation
Actimetry

Trial Safety

Safety Estimate

1 of 3

Compared to trials

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Intensive rehabilitation without workstation
Intensive rehabilitation with workstations

This trial requires 60 total participants across 2 different treatment groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Conventional Intensive Functional Rehabilitation + Workstations is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Intensive rehabilitation with workstations
Device
Intensive rehabilitation without workstation
Behavioral

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: end-measure, at the end of rehabilitation
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly end-measure, at the end of rehabilitation for reporting.

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
C. D.
Cyril Duclos, Researcher
Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal

Closest Location

CIUSSS centre-sud-de-l'ile-de-Montréal - Montréal, Canada

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There is one eligibility criterion to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Receving intensive rehabilitation care for hemiparesis due to stroke in our rehabilitation facility (IRGLM)

Patient Q&A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What are the signs of stroke?

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The commonest presenting symptoms are headache, dizziness and blurred vision that occur in a non-specific pattern and often occur without obvious environmental changes. It is important to suspect stroke if the presenting symptoms are persistent and if the environment is normal. The 'gold standard' is brain natriuretic peptide measurement, and this should be considered in most patients with stroke symptoms.

Unverified Answer

What is stroke?

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Ischemic stroke, caused by a blood-clot, is one of the most common and devastating types of neurological disease. It is the leading cause of disability and death worldwide. The global burden of stroke, which includes ischemic stroke, is a major global problem and the major cause of death from non-communicable diseases. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), in 2007 there was a global death toll of 6.9 million from ischemic stroke.

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How many people get stroke a year in the United States?

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About one person in every 488 live beyond 30 years of age. The annual number of patients with recent stroke may vary from 3,000 to 20,000, depending upon how recently they were hospitalized. There are also demographic differences between recent stroke and 30-year-olds; recent stroke is more common among those over age 70 (8.5 per 1,000) than among the ages 45-69 (4.8 per 1,000).

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Can stroke be cured?

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Although major improvements in the treatment of stroke in the USA have occurred in the last 20 years, the incidence of the disease continues to be much higher than expected. Only after years of continued and well-planned treatment does the patient revert to baseline. Thus, one may legitimately ask whether stroke is treatable. Results from a recent clinical trial provides no scientific evidence for the proposal of a non-fatal cure for stroke.

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What causes stroke?

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The main causes of stroke include arterial stenosis, hemorrhage, and embolism. Arterial stenosis is the most common cause of stroke in the United States, especially carotid artery stenosis, peripheral artery disease, and carotid and vertebral aneurysms. Hemorrhagic stroke can be caused by intracerebral bleeding, bleeding at other sites outside of the brain, or rupture of an aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation. Stroke from embolism is generally the result of an embolic source, such as atrial fibrillation, mitral valve stenosis, patent foramen ovale, or the carotid artery and a patent foramen ovale.

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for stroke?

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Treatment for stroke is highly customized based on the patient's needs and history of stroke. Frequently used treatments include physiotherapy, massage, blood pressure control, weight loss, anticoagulants, and thrombolytic drugs.

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Who should consider clinical trials for stroke?

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In order to identify a population whose risks and benefits might justify treatment of symptomatic ischemic stroke one needs to identify which risk factors and clinical deficits will influence treatment outcome.

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Have there been other clinical trials involving conventional intensive functional rehabilitation + workstations?

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The workstation + conventional intensive rehabilitation does not seem to be more effective than conventional intensive rehabilitation per se. Although the latter tends to be more economical, one may be misled into thinking that rehabilitation should be the main intervention. Findings from a recent study emphasizes the importance of workstation participation in conventional rehabilitation.

Unverified Answer

Has conventional intensive functional rehabilitation + workstations proven to be more effective than a placebo?

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Functional rehabilitation for people recovering from the subacute phase after an uncomplicated acute stroke seems to be effective, especially when provided within a workstation environment containing occupational treatment. Findings from a recent study need to be proven in clinical trials.

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Does stroke run in families?

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Results from a recent paper suggest that genetic factors may be contributing to the occurrence of stroke in certain families, but their contribution to the occurrence of stroke in families as a whole remains unclear.

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What does conventional intensive functional rehabilitation + workstations usually treat?

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We found that workstation and the time in the workstation and intensive functional rehabilitation (FFR) programs are efficacious in the functional and social outcomes measured in patients with chronic stroke. These data support a growing body of evidence suggesting that combining FFR with conventional therapies is clinically more effective for improving everyday functioning after stroke than FFR alone.

Unverified Answer

How does conventional intensive functional rehabilitation + workstations work?

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Intensive functional rehabilitation of stroke patients does not significantly increase the workstation time, compared to a conventional conventional rehabilitation in which time restrictions are avoided. If the time constraints are a constraint in everyday work the intervention should be further improved.

Unverified Answer
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