MRI imaging of the pelvis/bladder for Urinary Bladder Cancer

Phase-Based Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA
Urinary Bladder Cancer+1 More
MRI imaging of the pelvis/bladder - DiagnosticTest
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Urinary Bladder Cancer

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether a new imaging technique can help identify bladder cancer.

See full description

Eligible Conditions

  • Urinary Bladder Cancer
  • Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
  • Bladder Cancer Stage II

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Estimate

1 of 3

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether MRI imaging of the pelvis/bladder will improve 1 primary outcome in patients with Urinary Bladder Cancer. Measurement will happen over the course of 3 months.

3 months
Number of participants who proceed with MRI imaging and sequencing of bladder tumor

Trial Safety

Safety Estimate

1 of 3

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Control
4D MRI of pelvis/bladder with genomic analysis of bladder tumor

This trial requires 20 total participants across 2 different treatment groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. MRI Imaging Of The Pelvis/bladder is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

4D MRI of pelvis/bladder with genomic analysis of bladder tumorPatients with sessile appearing bladder masses who are destined to undergo transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) and are felt by the treating physician to harbor MIBC will be enrolled. Prior to TURBT, ALL subjects will undergo axial imaging for clinical staging in the form of contrast enhanced MRI of the abdomen and pelvis (standard of care). The pelvic MRI will be multiparametric (mp)-4D MRI incorporating high resolution diffusion weighted imaging (HR-DWI). Both the abdominal and pelvic MRI will have an official interpretation by a radiologist, thus both can be used in the care of the subject. Next, ALL subjects will undergo TURBT at which time, voided urine, blood and fresh frozen bladder tumor will be collected. Follow-up pathology will be collected.
ControlNo treatment in the control group

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 3 months
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly 3 months for reporting.

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
C. R.
Prof. Charles Rosser, Professor
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Closest Location

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center - Los Angeles, CA

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 10 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Patients must be > 18 years of age. show original
Patient must have a sessile mass noted within the bladder on cystoscopy or imaging worrisome for bladder cancer, specifically MIBC.
Patient must agree to undergo staging which will include mp-4D MRI HR-DWI of the pelvis in addition to standard axial imaging of the abdomen.
Patient must be agreeable to undergo TURBT as part of the normal treatment course. show original
Patients must not have known or suspected primary urothelial carcinoma of the ureter, urethra, or renal pelvis.
Patients must not have known distant metastatic disease (e.g. pulmonary or hepatic metastases). Subjects with malignant lymphadenopathy in the abdomen or pelvis considered appropriate for radical cystectomy and lymphadenectomy with the goal of complete resection of all malignant disease are allowed.
Patients must not have had prior definitive treatment for bladder cancer.
You must be free of active infection or uncontrolled medical condition that would preclude participation in the study. show original
You must not have any active malignancy other than urothelial carcinoma of the bladder that, in the opinion of the treating investigator, which could interfere with protocol treatment. show original
Patient must have adequate renal function: Serum creatinine < 2 mg/dL OR calculated CrCl > 30ml/min.

Patient Q&A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What causes urinary bladder cancer?

Add answer

Both smoking and occupation are factors associated with bladder cancer. However, environmental and occupational exposures to tobacco are linked to bladder cancer at rates up to ten times those without exposure. The most consistent environmental exposures associated with bladder cancer are those linked to the manufacture and use of tobacco. More research into risk factors for bladder cancer is required.

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for urinary bladder cancer?

Add answer

Most patients with bladder cancer are diagnosed through endoscopic or laparoscopic evaluation and management. Radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery may be used to treat bladder cancer. Chemotherapy may be used with or without surgery. Surgery may be used with or without chemotherapy. Surgery can be curative, and some patients with localized disease do well with curative surgery. The type of surgery depends on the stage of the bladder cancer when it is first detected, as well as other factors such as the patient's overall health and overall preferences. Treatment options for patients with bladder cancer are available from a wide variety of healthcare professionals.

Unverified Answer

Can urinary bladder cancer be cured?

Add answer

Although there are some cases of people who have a complete response to treatment and who can expect to be cured of their urinary bladder cancer, the cure rate in our practice is less than 50%. However, since current therapy is very effective, the chances of cure would be much higher for those with a stage I-II disease. Since staging and grading have not yet changed our practice, we no longer consider it possible to cure urinary bladder cancer.

Unverified Answer

What is urinary bladder cancer?

Add answer

Overall survival of bladder cancer in North America is markedly inferior to reports in other European regions. Many factors exist that contribute to the higher bladder cancer mortality in the North American region. Although bladder cancer mortality rates have decreased in the United States in the last three decades, bladder cancer remains a devastating and devastating disease during both its prodromal and metastatic phases. To advance bladder cancer prevention, research and treatment must recognize that survival is affected by preclinical risk, tumor progression, and treatment selection.

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of urinary bladder cancer?

Add answer

In order to diagnose and treat bladder cancer patients correctly, it is essential to know the signs, symptoms, and risk factors of the disease. There are multiple medical terms for bladder cancer which can be used to describe the disease, and they are specific to each individual patient. The signs and symptoms of bladder cancer are very broad and often depend on whether or not it has metastasised.\n\n•The most common symptoms of bladder cancer are blood in the urine (hematuria), frequent urination over a short period, or pain or irritation when urinating.\n\n•Frequency of urination.

Unverified Answer

How many people get urinary bladder cancer a year in the United States?

Add answer

The combined incidence of bladder cancer was 0.63 per 10,000 population per year in the United States in 2001. The incidence rate of bladder cancer increased between the 1990 and the 2000s due to the increasing trend of smoking in the United States. The present data also show that bladder cancer is more likely in men and those of older age, but this does not affect patient survival.

Unverified Answer

Does mri imaging of the pelvis/bladder improve quality of life for those with urinary bladder cancer?

Add answer

Results from a recent clinical trial indicates that when combined with the standard pelvic CT, mri ureterography improves quality of life in patients with bladder cancer.

Unverified Answer

What is the primary cause of urinary bladder cancer?

Add answer

It is possible that the primary cause of bladder cancer is related to [a genetic predisposition or environmental exposures] that leads to either abnormal cellular proliferative activity, or changes to the normal cellular proliferative activity.

Unverified Answer

What are the common side effects of mri imaging of the pelvis/bladder?

Add answer

MRIs of the pelvis/bladder are used extensively in oncology to diagnose and monitor pelvic cancers. The use of gadolinium compounds in the body can cause common side effects such as bloating and urticaria. Additionally, radiation exposure also increases side effects such as fatigue and nausea.

Unverified Answer

Does urinary bladder cancer run in families?

Add answer

The findings suggest that there is significant genetic predisposition for bladder cancer in families of individuals with bladder cancer and this effect is not related to the timing of bladder cancer diagnosis (within or outside a family setting). Power.

Unverified Answer

What are the latest developments in mri imaging of the pelvis/bladder for therapeutic use?

Add answer

This article describes the use of MRI of a patient with bladder cancer, but the most common use is by urologists to better understand bladder cancer anatomy, and therefore better facilitate its staging and treatment.

Unverified Answer

Has mri imaging of the pelvis/bladder proven to be more effective than a placebo?

Add answer

The use of MRI (pelvis, bladder, and retrorectis pouch) with and without gadolinium at baseline and with follow-up imaging was not superior to placebo at this time.

Unverified Answer
See if you qualify for this trial
Get access to this novel treatment for Urinary Bladder Cancer by sharing your contact details with the study coordinator.