Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
Image of UQO in Gatineau, Canada.
Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety

Virtual Reality And Exercicefor Obesity

18 - 65
Female
The objectives of the project are to: i) assess the feasibility and acceptability of the protocol and the VR exposure intervention in women with obesity, and ii) obtain an estimate of the effect of VR exposure intervention associated with an exercise training on SPA, compliance, adherence and persistence to the exercise training, as well as persistence in PA practice in the middle term to calculate the sample size for a future larger randomized controlled trial (RCT) in women with obesity. A RCT of feasibility will be carried out. Forty-five women with obesity and a high level of SPA will be randomized into one of the following three groups: 1) Exercice and VR exposure (Ex + expo), 2) Exercise and psychological intervention control (Ex + control) or 3) waiting list (WL). The interventions will have a physical exercise training (identical for all) and a psychology intervention (different according to the condition: VR exposure or control). The feasibility and acceptability of the protocol and the VR exposure intervention will be assessed at the end of the study. SPA, PA practice, anthropometry, internalization of weight bias, body appreciation, perceived pleasure, motivational regulation, self-efficacy, affects as well as perception effort will be evaluated with questionnaires and scales validated before and after the intervention and 6 months after the end of the intervention. Sociodemographic data, depressive symptoms, problematic eating behaviors and propensity to immersion will be assessed during the initial visit only. Adherence, adherence and persistence to the PA program will be calculated at the end of the intervention. Persistence in PA practice will be calculated using data collected immediately after the end of the intervention and 6 months after the intervention.
Recruiting
Behavior
UQO
25 Virtual Reality Clinical Trials Near Me
Virtual Reality Clinical Trials by Phase of Trial
N/A Virtual Reality Clinical Trials
147Active Virtual Reality Clinical Trials
117Number of Unique Treatments
126Number of Active Locations
Virtual RealityVirtual Reality Software Usability in Healthy Volunteers Age 18-35 YearsVirtual Reality (VR) MeditationVirtual Reality Assisted Guided Imagery (VRAGI )gameChangeOccupational Therapy +Virtual RealityOff the Shelf VR (PR-VR program + usual care)Pain Rehabilitation Virtual Reality (PRVR)
Most Recent Virtual Reality Clinical Trials

What Are Virtual Reality Clinical Trials?

Virtual reality (VR) clinical trials are a type of research study that uses virtual reality technology to collect data from participants. These studies can be used to investigate VR's efficacy in treating conditions like phantom limb pain, PTSD, and dementia.

VR clinical trials have several advantages over traditional research methods. For example, they can be used to study rare conditions such as phobia disorders. Additionally, virtual reality clinical trials can provide a more realistic environment for participants than traditional research settings.

Why Is Virtual Reality Being Studied in Clinical Trials?

VR is being studied in clinical trials because it has the potential to improve the quality of data collected from participants. Placing participants in a more realistic setting can help produce accurate data.

How Do Virtual Reality Clinical Trials Work?

Virtual reality clinical trials typically involve using a head-mounted display (HMD) to immerse participants in a virtual environment. This environment can be used to study a variety of topics, including the efficacy of new treatments and interventions.

What Are Some of The Breakthrough Clinical Trials Involving Virtual Reality?

A few notable virtual reality clinical trials that have been conducted in the past decade include a trial investigating the efficacy of virtual reality therapy for:

2019: treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) - This study found that virtual reality therapy (VRET) was more effective than traditional exposure therapy in treating PTSD. The trial followed 92 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans diagnosed with combat-related PTSD. They compared Trauma Management Therapy versus non-VRET treatment.

2022: a trial studying virtual reality to reduce pain during childbirth - This study found that virtual reality effectively reduces pain during delivery. The study followed 42 laboring women as they gave birth. Patients were hooked up to VR during labor and were distracted from pain during the process. There was a high level of satisfaction, with 95% of women stating they'd use VR again during labor.

2021: a trial examining virtual reality to improve the quality of life for patients with dementia - This study found that virtual reality can enhance the quality of life for patients with dementia. Out of a group of 17 patients with ten sessions, researchers found that VR was an effective approach for neurocognitive stimulation for older adults with dementia.

Who Are The Key Opinion Leaders On Virtual Reality Clinical Trial Research?

Dr. Jim Blascovich is the Director of the Institute for Imagination and Reality at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is also a Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. He has conducted several virtual reality clinical trials, including a study on the efficacy of a virtual reality treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Dr. Jeremy Bailenson is the Founding Director of Stanford University's Virtual Human Interaction Lab. He is also a Professor in the Department of Communication and a Fellow of the Woods Institute for the Environment. He has conducted virtual reality clinical trials on various topics, including social anxiety and body image.

Dr. Albert "Skip" Rizzo is the Director of the University of Southern California's Institute for Creative Technologies. He is also a Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Biomedical Engineering. He has conducted virtual reality clinical trials on virtual reality for treating phobias, PTSD, and pain management.

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 6th, 2021

Last Reviewed: November 25th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.

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