Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
Image of Canadian Center for Vaccinology in Halifax, Canada.
Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety

Group G3, Subgroup G3-Bfor COVID-19

18 - 65
All Sexes
VBI-2901e is an investigational vaccine candidate that uses enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs) to express the spike proteins of three coronaviruses: SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19 disease), SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV. The trivalent vaccine candidate is designed to induce neutralizing antibody and cell-mediated immune responses against the spike protein of the original strain of SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, variants and subvariants of SARS-CoV-2 (such as Beta, Delta and Omicron BA.5) and other related coronaviruses that could emerge in the future. VBI-2901e contains two adjuvants: aluminum phosphate and E6020. The role of the adjuvants is to create a stronger immune response to the vaccine. This Phase 1 study will be an open-label study of VBI-2901e comparing three dose levels of the E6020 adjuvant component (1, 3, or 10 µg per dose) in adults 18 to 40 years of age who had previously received two or more vaccinations with licensed COVID-19 vaccine(s). VBI-2901e at each dose level of E6020 will be administered as either a single dose or two-dose regimen. The purpose of the study is to test the safety of VBI-2901e and to learn more about its ability to boost immune responses against SARS-CoV-2 and the two related coronaviruses SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV.
Phase 1
Waitlist Available
Canadian Center for Vaccinology (+3 Sites)William Cameron, MDVBI Vaccines Inc.
25 Coronavirus Clinical Trials Near Me
Top Hospitals for Coronavirus Clinical Trials
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Canadian Center for Vaccinology
Halifax
2Active Trials
2All Time Trials for Coronavirus
2022First Coronavirus Trial
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Red Maple Trials
Ottawa
2Active Trials
2All Time Trials for Coronavirus
2022First Coronavirus Trial
Top Cities for Coronavirus Clinical Trials
Image of Toronto in Ontario.
Toronto
6Active Trials
LMC Manna - Bayview CPUTop Active Site
Most Recent Coronavirus Clinical Trials
Top Treatments for Coronavirus Clinical Trials
Treatment Name
Active Coronavirus Clinical Trials
All Time Trials for Coronavirus
First Recorded Coronavirus Trial
Group G3, Subgroup G3-B
1
1
2022
mRNA-1045 Dose Level B
1
1
2022
VBI-2901a
1
1
2022
9vHPV Vaccine
1
1
2022
Metoprolol Succinate
1
1
2022
Recently Completed Studies with FDA Approved Treatments for Coronavirus
Treatment
Year
Sponsor
CloSYS Ultra Sensitive Rinse mouthwash
2021
University of California, San Francisco
SIR1-365
2020
Sironax USA, Inc.
Duvelisib
2020
Emory University
Molnupiravir
2020
Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.
Rivaroxaban
2020
Janssen Research & Development, LLC

What Are Coronavirus Clinical Trials?

Coronaviruses are a broad collection of RNA viruses that manifest as respiratory and intestinal illnesses. Seven coronaviruses have been identified in humans, with four known to cause mild respiratory illnesses.

Since first being discovered in 1965, human coronaviruses have been responsible for several epidemics, including the most recent SARS-Cov-2 pandemic in 2019 and the MERS epidemic in 2012. Using serological methods, researchers have made enormous strides in understanding coronaviruses, including how they look, in which climates they thrive, and the population percentage affected by these viruses.

Why Is Coronavirus Being Studied Through Clinical Trials?

Coronaviruses are responsible for thirty-five percent of viral respiratory infections during epidemics, and fifteen percent of cold in the adult population. Although the symptoms of mild coronavirus infections can be managed with supportive care, these infections can have severe, lasting effects in immune-compromised patients.

Furthermore, coronaviruses contain genetic material that allows them to mutate their pathogenic mechanisms and infect new species. As witnessed in past coronavirus epidemics, these mutations can cause devastating, widespread illnesses that are challenging to treat. Therefore, clinical trials are essential to understanding and managing coronavirus infections.

What Are The Types of Treatments Available For Coronavirus?

Mild coronavirus infections seldom require hospitalization. Instead, respiratory and gastrointestinal manifestations are managed symptomatically. However, there are several more intensive management approaches in hospitalized COVID patients.

Hospitalized coronavirus patients frequently received oxygen therapy and corticosteroids to manage hypoxemia. Furthermore, broad-spectrum antibiotics treat opportunistic fungal and bacterial infections.

Clinical trials have discovered several drug classes effective at managing coronavirus infections. There have been more than two hundred trials about the efficacy of antivirals such as chloroquine and azithromycin in immunomodulation and the prevention of viral replication. Alternative treatment strategies include synthetic monoclonal antibodies, such as Bebtelovimab, and convalescent plasma treatments.

What Are Some Recent Breakthrough Clinical Trials For Coronavirus?

There have been several fascinating discoveries made through coronavirus clinical trials, including the following:

2021: Predicting the success of vaccines without large trials: Researchers at the US National Institute of Infectious Diseases developed a method of deciphering which immune responses to target in the Moderna SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Researchers could determine which antibodies recognized the virus’s spike proteins by inoculating animals with a range of vaccine doses. Ultimately, this assisted in accelerating clinical trial research.

2021: Asthma medicine in managing the respiratory symptoms of coronavirus infections: Researchers at the University of Oxford performed a clinical trial to determine the efficacy of budesonide in geriatric and compromised patients. They found that inhaled budesonide shortened the duration of illness.

Who Are Some Of The Key Institutions Conducting Coronavirus Clinical Trial Research?

The University of Hong Kong

The University of Hong Kong is the global leader in coronavirus research. Researchers at The University of Hong Kong initiated a long-term study about the lasting effects of coronavirus infections. The outcome of this study is essential to managing the secondary harm caused by widespread infection during the pandemic.

The Centres for Disease Control and Prevention

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been instrumental in clinical trials to determine the efficacy of coronavirus vaccines, the effects of infection on various patient demographics, and the viral transmission trends.

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 29th, 2021

Last Reviewed: October 15th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.

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