Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
Image of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, United States.
Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety

Culinary Medicinefor Sarcopenia

65+
All Sexes
Aging is associated with a decline in muscle mass, strength, and physical function, leading to muscle mass loss and weakness. These concerns can impact an individual's functional independence and quality of life (QOL). Dietary protein stimulates muscle protein growth. Current studies suggest that optimal protein intake for older adults is greater than the Recommended Dietary Allowance. Barriers to consuming protein-rich foods in older adults include reductions in taste and smell, dentition, dexterity, and changes in living situation. Therefore, nutritional interventions are needed to effectively improve eating behaviors, diet quality, and stimulate muscle growth and strength. These interventions will help prevent, manage, and promote muscle mass loss recovery. Older adults may not be aware of their changing nutrient needs and therefore may lack the skills to prepare nutritionally adequate foods properly. Cooking demonstrations, or culinary medicine (CM), can help teach healthy cooking to reduce potential red meat consumption barriers and improve community-dwelling older adults' dietary habits. Thus, CM can be a novel strategy to improve diet quality in older adults and promote and augment at-home cooking. CM is an evidenced-base field that combines skills of preparing, cooking, and presenting food with the science of medicine. This field can help to accomplish potential eating behaviors and health outcome improvements. A tailored CM program can be an effective strategy that could reduce barriers in protein intake that will enable older adults to age well and productively.
Recruiting
Has No Placebo
Texas Tech University
Image of University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Canada.
Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety

Objective Auto-regulation Trainingfor Sarcopenia

18+
All Sexes
This research study is comparing the effect of traditional standardized, subjective auto-regulated, and objective auto-regulated resistance training on physiological adaptations and performance measures in adults aged 50 years or older. Traditional standardized resistance training involves prescribing resistance training as a percentage of an individual's one-repetition maximum (i.e., the maximal weight they can lift one time). Auto-regulated resistance training involves adjusting resistance training based on an individual's performance during the session. Subjective auto-regulation involves the resistance trainee providing a subjective rating of perceived exertion based on repetitions in reserve (on a scale from 1 - 10) to adjust the resistance training prescription. A rating of perceived exertion of 10 would mean that the resistance trainee believes that they have provided maximal effort and believes that they could not have performed an additional repetition during the set nor increased the load. Objective auto-regulation involves adjusting the resistance training prescription from a linear position transducer (a device that has a string that attaches to the barbell and provides a velocity value on each repetition). A slower velocity value means a higher perceived exertion and load used, whereas a faster velocity value means a lower perceived exertion and load used.
Recruiting
Has No Placebo
University of Saskatchewan
25 Sarcopenia Clinical Trials Near Me
Top Hospitals for Sarcopenia Clinical Trials
Image of University of Utah in Utah.
University of Utah
Salt Lake City
2Active Trials
2All Time Trials for Sarcopenia
2017First Sarcopenia Trial
Image of VA Western New York Healthcare System, Buffalo, NY in New York.
VA Western New York Healthcare System, Buffalo, NY
Buffalo
2Active Trials
1All Time Trials for Sarcopenia
2018First Sarcopenia Trial
Top Cities for Sarcopenia Clinical Trials
Image of Baltimore in Maryland.
Baltimore
4Active Trials
U of Maryland, Baltimore, Professional Schools IRBTop Active Site
Image of Boston in Massachusetts.
Boston
3Active Trials
Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts UniversityTop Active Site
Most Recent Sarcopenia Clinical Trials
Top Treatments for Sarcopenia Clinical Trials
Treatment Name
Active Sarcopenia Clinical Trials
All Time Trials for Sarcopenia
First Recorded Sarcopenia Trial
Exercise training
2
5
2011
Culinary Medicine
1
1
2022
Objective auto-regulation training
1
1
2022
MAsS
1
1
2022
Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) creation
1
1
2022

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 20th, 2021

Last Reviewed: November 2nd, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.

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