Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials 2023

Browse 99 Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Medical Studies Across 243 Cities

33 Phase 3 Trial · 937 Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinics

Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
10 Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials Near Me
Top Hospitals for Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials
Image of Cleveland Clinic in Ohio.
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland
6Active Trials
4All Time Trials for Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
2013First Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Trial
Image of University of California San Francisco in California.
University of California San Francisco
San Francisco
5Active Trials
3All Time Trials for Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
2016First Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Trial
Image of Memorial Healthcare Institute for Neurosciences and Multiple Sclerosis in Michigan.
Memorial Healthcare Institute for Neurosciences and Multiple Sclerosis
Owosso
5Active Trials
2All Time Trials for Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
2020First Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Trial
Image of Johns Hopkins University in Maryland.
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore
4Active Trials
1All Time Trials for Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
1988First Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Trial
Image of National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Maryland.
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center
Bethesda
4Active Trials
0All Time Trials for Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
2016First Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Trial
Top Cities for Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials
Image of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania.
Philadelphia
25Active Trials
Thomas Jefferson UniversityTop Active Site
Image of Saint Louis in Missouri.
Saint Louis
19Active Trials
Washington University School of MedicineTop Active Site
Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials by Phase of TrialPrimary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials by Age Group
< 18 Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials
4Active Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials
Most Recent Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical TrialsTop Treatments for Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials
Treatment Name
Active Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials
All Time Trials for Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
First Recorded Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Trial
Ocrelizumab
14
14
2008
Treatment
4
4
1988
Ofatumumab
4
4
2018
Tolebrutinib
4
4
2019
Fenebrutinib
3
3
2020
Recently Completed Studies with FDA Approved Treatments for Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
Treatment
Year
Sponsor
Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid
2018
Johns Hopkins University

What are Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials?

Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) is a type of multiple sclerosis (MS) that does not have relapses or remissions. While there may appear to be periods of minor improvements, there is an overall continuous decline in neurological ability.

MS is classified as a neurodegenerative disease because of the deterioration of the myelin sheath that insulates the nerve cells in the central nervous system. This myelin damage disrupts the signals that travel along the nerves, resulting in various mental, physical and possible psychiatric problems.

As there is no cure for MS, the outlook for PPMS is not good, and patients' conditions worsen, leading to poor quality of life and life-threatening complications.

Why Is Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Being Studied Through Clinical Trials?

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common central nervous system disorder in the US, with one million cases reported in 2023. Of these it is 10 – 15% are estimated to have primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS).

Even though it is understood myelin damage causes MS, researchers still do not know why the immune system attacks this covering. Many theories have suggested genetic or external factor links, and more research is necessary to determine risk factors and develop better detection tools.

Currently, there is no cure for any MS variant, and healthcare providers can only provide management options to limit the extent of the symptoms. For people suffering from PPMS, the prognosis is unfavorable. The constant decline of neurological function results in growing disabilities, adversely affecting the quality of life.

Clinical trials are the most effective way to test new drugs and therapies. They must find better drugs to counteract symptoms, slow the progressive decline, and reverse the myelin damage.

What Treatment is Available for Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis?

PPMS is diagnosed based on the presentation of related symptoms, physical exams, MRI scans, cerebrospinal fluid testing, and lab tests. Early detection is challenging because many neurological symptoms that arise in the beginning are shared with other medical conditions.

Medications to manage PPMS symptoms are prescribed, and patients are advised to maintain their fitness and mobility through moderate exercise and occupational and physical therapy.

Ocrelizumab injections (FDA-approved) may also be given as it has been shown to help slow down the progression of neurological decline in some cases of PPMS.

What are Some Recent Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trial Breakthroughs?

2019: An investigation into the role of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the development of multiple sclerosis. From 1993 to 2013, researchers studied 10 million active-duty US military personnel. They found a compelling link between EBV and MS, such that people infected with the virus were 32 times more likely to have MS later in life.

2023: A clinical study by the Cleveland Clinic is currently researching a new biomarker, called the central vein sign (CVS), to diagnose MS. Sponsored by the National Institute of Health (NIH), this multimillion-dollar endeavor is testing 400 adults who may have MS. This study aims to determine the CVS can help detect MS earlier and more accurately than current diagnostic criteria.

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 16th, 2021

Last Reviewed: August 24th, 2023

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