Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
25 Sepsis Clinical Trials Near Me
Top Hospitals for Sepsis Clinical Trials
Image of Children's Hospital Colorado in Colorado.
Children's Hospital Colorado
Aurora
4Active Trials
4All Time Trials for Sepsis
2020First Sepsis Trial
Image of Washington University in Missouri.
Washington University
Saint Louis
3Active Trials
6All Time Trials for Sepsis
2020First Sepsis Trial
Sepsis Clinical Trials by Phase of Trial
Phase 1 Sepsis Clinical Trials
7Active Sepsis Clinical Trials
7Number of Unique Treatments
5Number of Active Locations
Sepsis Clinical Trials by Age Group
< 18 Sepsis Clinical Trials
5Active Sepsis Clinical Trials
Top Treatments for Sepsis Clinical Trials
Treatment Name
Active Sepsis Clinical Trials
All Time Trials for Sepsis
First Recorded Sepsis Trial
GM-CSF
2
3
2011
Sepsis Education
1
1
2014
PRESS Intervention
1
1
2022
Alirocumab
1
1
2022
Nutrition Ecosystem pathway
1
1
2022
Recently Completed Studies with FDA Approved Treatments for Sepsis
Treatment
Year
Sponsor
Thiamine Hydrochloride
2018
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

What are Sepsis Clinical Trials?

Sepsis, also known as blood poisoning, is caused by the extreme response of the body’s immune system to an infection. The body attacks its healthy tissues and organs, leading to tissue damage and multiple organ failure. This overactive response is followed by immune system suppression, leaving the body defenseless in the face of further infection. It is a critical, life-threatening condition that can lead to death if not immediately treated. Along with the symptoms of the primary infection, sepsis leads to fever, confusion, and rapid breathing and pulse.

While many people can recover from mild sepsis, they are often plagued with life-long cognitive and health issues. These effects are now known as post-sepsis syndrome (PSS) and include symptoms like physical disabilities, cognitive disabilities, and poor quality of life.

Why Study Sepsis Through Clinical Trials?

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that develops in 1.7 million Americans yearly, with 20.5% dying while hospitalized or after being discharged. This data shows that the current management methods have room for improvement to decrease the mortality rate.

Clinical trials are vital in developing better treatment plans that are faster, more effective, and can overcome the antibiotic resistance that develops in patients with sepsis. These trials can also improve testing methods so sepsis can be diagnosed in the initial stages, giving a better outcome.

What Are The Types of Treatments Available For Sepsis?

Sepsis is managed with an aggressive treatment plan that involves multiple therapies. As soon as blood cultures are taken, broad-spectrum antibiotics and fluids are given intravenously. Red blood cell transfusions may also be recommended depending on the patient's hemoglobin level.

If the patient goes into septic shock (low blood pressure due to sepsis), vasopressors such as norepinephrine are given to raise the blood pressure. However, too much can be toxic, in which case doctors may also administer epinephrine. If a patient is not brought out of septic shock, it leads to death in 34.7% of cases within 30 days.

Source control is also done by draining pus from abscesses that form inside the body to reduce the growth of microorganisms creating the infection.

What are Some Notable Breakthroughs in Sepsis Clinical Trials?

2019: A review studied clinical data from trials that used corticosteroids to treat septic shock. It found that low doses of hydrocortisone could be beneficial for patients who needed more than 30 μg/min of vasopressors and had at least one case of organ failure. However, it was noted that steroids should be used cautiously and tapered off when no longer required.

2021: A review of data from clinical trials that used vitamin C in sepsis intervention was studied. These trials were based on Dr. Paul E. Marik, Marik Protocol. Now known as the HAT protocol, this treatment proposes using steroids, vitamin C, and thiamine to manage sepsis for patients in ICU. Preliminary conclusions suggest that vitamin C may reduce mortality in patients compared to a placebo group.

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 20th, 2021

Last Reviewed: October 26th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.

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