Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
25 Dry Eye Clinical Trials Near Me
Top Hospitals for Dry Eye Clinical Trials
Image of Eye Research Foundation in California.
Eye Research Foundation
Newport Beach
4Active Trials
23All Time Trials for Dry Eye
2014First Dry Eye Trial
Image of Lugene Eye Institute - Glendale Office in California.
Lugene Eye Institute - Glendale Office
Glendale
2Active Trials
2All Time Trials for Dry Eye
2022First Dry Eye Trial
Most Recent Dry Eye Clinical Trials
Top Treatments for Dry Eye Clinical Trials
Treatment Name
Active Dry Eye Clinical Trials
All Time Trials for Dry Eye
First Recorded Dry Eye Trial
Oxervate
2
2
2022
OC-01 (varenicline 0.6mg/ml) nasal spray
2
2
2021
Lifitegrast 5% Ophthalmic Solution
2
7
2020
Tivanisiran sodium ophthalmic solution
2
2
2021
TearCare
2
5
2016
Recently Completed Studies with FDA Approved Treatments for Dry Eye
Treatment
Year
Sponsor
Reproxalap Ophthalmic Solution (0.25%)
2022
Aldeyra Therapeutics, Inc.
OC-01 (varenicline 0.6mg/ml) Nasal Spray
2021
Center for Ophthalmic and Vision Research, LLC
Reproxalap Ophthalmic Solution (0.25%)
2021
Aldeyra Therapeutics, Inc.
Reproxalap Ophthalmic Solution (0.25%)
2021
Aldeyra Therapeutics, Inc.
Dexamethasone
2021
Research Insight LLC
Reproxalap Ophthalmic Solution (0.25%)
2021
Aldeyra Therapeutics, Inc.
OTX-DED
2021
Ocular Therapeutix, Inc.
Mycophenolic Acid 0.3%
2021
Surface Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
0.04% Betamethasone Sodium Phosphate
2021
Surface Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
CyclASol Ophthalmic Solution
2021
Novaliq GmbH

What Are Dry Eye Clinical Trials?

Dry eye syndrome, or DES, is a condition that affects over 16 million in the United States alone. Dry eye syndrome is characterized by an inability to produce enough moisture or lubrication for the eyes, which can lead to discomfort and inflammation of the eye. This inflammation can, in turn, lead to damage to the eye or visual impairment.

There are several causes of dry eye disease. Diagnosed patients generally have tears that don't effectively lubricate their eyes. Alternatively, tears that evaporate too quickly to be absorbed by the eye and glands that under-produce moisture and lubrication can also lead to Dry eye syndrome.

Currently, clinical trials for dry eyes are being undertaken to better understand the condition and, as a result, how to better treat and manage it within patients.

Why Is Dry Eye Being Studied Through Clinical Trials?

Dry eye syndrome has several risk factors, including gender, age, and health. Patients with dry eye syndrome are typically over fifty, and the condition is more common among women.

Over sixty percent of women are diagnosed with dry eye because it is theorized that low testosterone and high estrogen levels may contribute to developing the condition. It can also be triggered by a lack of vitamin A and autoimmune diseases.

Dry eye clinical trials, like all conditions and illnesses, are essential for medical professionals and researchers to better understand potential causes, diagnostics, and treatments. Due to the prevalence of this condition, learning more about it is vital for advancing dry eye syndrome research within the medical field.

In time, researchers hope to find a curative treatment that may help patients improve their quality of life and eliminate the condition altogether.

What Are The Types of Treatments Available For Dry Eye?

Several treatments for dry eye are available, including multiple medications and surgeries. However, the treatment offered to patients depends on the severity of the condition. Some patients may experience mild to moderate symptoms, while others have more extreme or severe symptoms.

For mild cases, patients are prescribed medications or eye drops that may help them to manage their condition. Similarly, some patients may stifle their symptoms with simple lifestyle changes. On the other hand, more severe cases are generally treated with surgeries or plugs that may close or restrict the tear ducts.

Most dry eye clinical trials are important for furthering research into the condition, trying new medications and treatments, improving diagnostic tests, and refining diagnostic criteria.

What Are Some Recent Breakthrough Clinical Trials For Dry Eye?

Dry eyes affect over sixty percent of aging women but are also diagnosed as a comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases. The prevalence of this condition has led to continued research that has brought a few crucial breakthroughs to light. These breakthroughs include:

2022: Comprehensive Etiologies – Over the years, clinical trials have profoundly impacted the understanding of dry eye syndrome and its causes. These causes, also known as etiology, have evolved over time thanks to findings of clinical trials and have led to more efficient diagnostic procedures. These etiologies have advanced the diagnostic abilities of medical professionals across the world.

2022: Symptom Management – In 2022, the Seoul National University College of Medicine and the University of Manchester found a potential treatment for suppressing or relieving severe dry eye syndrome symptoms. The trial used a topical application of the TSG-6 polypeptide to reduce corneal lesions and other symptoms, where half the trial group saw positive results.

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 10th, 2021

Last Reviewed: October 21st, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.

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