Treatment for Previously Treated Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
2
Safety
Riddle Memorial Hospital, Media, PA
Previously Treated Non Small Cell Lung Cancer+2 More
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Select

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether a new type of cancer treatment may be effective.

See full description

Eligible Conditions

  • Previously Treated Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Previously Treated Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Treatment will improve 6 primary outcomes in patients with Previously Treated Non Small Cell Lung Cancer. Measurement will happen over the course of Up to 3 years.

Up to 3 years
Screening Success (Adequate Tissue)
Screening Success (Assignment Success)
Screening Success (Match to Biomarker-Driven Sub-Study)
Screening Success (Notice of Intention Not to Register Submission)
Screening Success (Prescreening-to-sub-study Assignment)
Screening Success (Tissue Submission)

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

2 of 3
This is further along than 68% of similar trials

Other trials for Previously Treated Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

Trial Design

0 Treatment Group

This trial requires 10000 total participants across 0 different treatment group

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: up to 3 years
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly up to 3 years for reporting.

Closest Location

Riddle Memorial Hospital - Media, PA

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. You must have received 1 prior treatment for Previously Treated Non Small Cell Lung Cancer or one of the other 2 conditions listed above. There are 10 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
5.1 Registration
Patients who need the fresh biopsy must also submit whole blood for ctDNA testing (see Section 15.3). These patients must be registered to Step 0 to obtain a patient ID number for the submission.
Patients registered to Step 0 are not registered to the LUNGMAP protocol. To participate in LUNGMAP, patients must be registered to Step 1 after evaluation of patient eligibility, including tumor tissue adequacy, per protocol Section 5.1, Step 1.
Patients registered at Step 0 must use the same SWOG patient ID for registration at Step 1.
Patients must have pathologically proven non-small cell lung cancer (all histologic types) confirmed by tumor biopsy and/or fine-needle aspiration. Disease must be Stage IV as defined in Section 4.0, or recurrent. The primary diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer should be established using the current WHO/IASLC-classification of Thoracic Malignancies. All histologies, including mixed, are allowed.
Patients must either be eligible to be screened at progression on prior treatment or to be pre-screened prior to progression on current treatment.
To be eligible for screening at progression, patients must have received at least one line of systemic therapy for any stage of disease (Stages I-IV) and must have progressed during or following their most recent line of therapy.
For patients whose prior systemic therapy was for Stage I-III disease only (i.e. patient has not received any treatment for Stage IV or recurrent disease), disease progression on platinum-based chemotherapy must have occurred within one year from the last date that patient received that therapy. For patients treated with consolidation anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy for Stage III disease, disease progression on consolidation anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy must have occurred within one year from the date or initiation of such therapy.
For patients whose prior therapy was for Stage IV or recurrent disease, the patient must have received at least one line of a platinum-based chemotherapy regimen or anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy, alone or in combination (e.g. Nivolumab or Pembrolizumab).
To be eligible for pre-screening, current treatment must be for Stage IV or recurrent disease and patient must have received at least one dose of the current regimen. Patients must have previously received or currently be receiving a platinum-based chemotherapy regimen or anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy, alone or in combination (e.g. Nivolumab or Pembrolizumab). Patients on first-line treatment are eligible upon receiving Cycle 1, Day 1 infusion. Note: Patients will not receive their sub-study assignment until they progress and the LUNGMAP Notice of Progression is submitted.

Patient Q&A Section

How many people get carcinoma, non-small-cell lung a year in the United States?

"Nearly one million Americans are diagnosed with lung carcinoma each year, and more than 100,000 dies are attributable to the disease. These figures are an underestimate of the true scope of the problem as only people who have been diagnosed with and dying of lung carcinoma are identified." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"Carcinoma, non-small-cell lung is primarily diagnosed in patients 65 or older, is more prevalent in women, and tends to appear more commonly in smokers. Because its incidence increases with age, carcinoma, non-small-cell lung is not considered a current cancer in patients under the age of 35. In the U.S., the American Thoracic Society and American College of Chest Physicians both recommend radiographs of the chest, especially for patients 65 or above, who are at an increased risk of this disease and its treatment complications." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Can carcinoma, non-small-cell lung be cured?

"Cancer can be cured with new technology in the last few years. It is better to detect it early before it gets too big or fast and, if needed, treat early while the cancer is still small enough for the cancer to be treated surgically. This is the key to curing cancer, and we are just on the start of a new era in medicine." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"Adenocarcinoma may present as a mass. Nodules or masses in the periphery are not good signs of this disorder. The size of the nodules, as well as the number, can be helpful in diagnosis." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What causes carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"The cause of carcinoma, non-small-cell lung is not really known yet, but most likely is a combination of factors which present in the womb or early development, genetic predisposition and environmental factors." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"Common treatments for carcinoma, non-small-cell lung include surgery that often involves chemotherapy and/or radiation, chemotherapy alone, radiotherapy alone, surgery and chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is the primary cause of carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"Smoking is the most common cause of carcinoma, non-small-cell lung for patients who present to our center. Carcinoma, non-small-cell lung is more common for younger patients." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"There is a high probability in this literature, that a therapeutic approach can enhance survival in a selected population of individuals. In order to be eligible, a trial must take into account the particular characteristics of the sub-group of patients, which includes factors on prognostic stratification, stage, pathological differentiation, biological, and genetic background of the disease. Clinical trials for people with NSCL may be a good approach to investigate the new therapies, which are more effective and less harmful on these patients." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

How does treatment work?

"Results from a recent clinical trial of this study lend strong evidence to the theory that CVS is a highly important factor in the treatment of early stage and low volume non-small cell lung cancer." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving treatment?

"There seem no additional clinical trial evidence for this treatment option for SLE patients. However, we must use all of the available evidence and consider the costs and risks of new therapies for SLE patients before prescribing new drugs such as hydroxychloroquine or cytotoxic agents (for instance, cyclophosphamide)." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

How serious can carcinoma, non-small-cell lung be?

"There is no difference between the cancer patients and the reference population in the frequency of the most serious complications of pneumonectomy. There is, however, a difference in surgical mortality and hospitalization costs." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Is treatment typically used in combination with any other treatments?

"Patients with lung cancer typically receive multiple drug treatment including chemotherapy and targeted therapy. The chemotherapy drug typically used with lung cancer typically includes paclitaxel, docetaxel, and carboplatin. The targeted therapy drug often used with lung cancer typically includes gefitinib in patients with adenocarcinoma; gemcitabine in patients with squamous cell carcinoma; Erlotinib in patients with small cell lung cancer; and bevacizumab in patients with large cell carcinoma." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer
Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.
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