CLINICAL TRIAL

THC for Hashish Abuse

Recruiting · 18 - 65 · All Sexes · Chicago, IL

This study is evaluating whether THC has the potential to be addictive.

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About the trial for Hashish Abuse

Eligible Conditions
Marijuana Abuse · Healthy Subjects (HS) · Cannabis Use

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. THC is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. Some patients will receive a placebo treatment. The treatments being tested are in Phase < 1 and are in the first stage of evaluation with people.

Main TreatmentA portion of participants receive this new treatment to see if it outperforms the control.
THC
DRUG
Control TreatmentAnother portion of participants receive the standard treatment to act as a baseline.
Placebo oral capsule
DRUG

About The Treatment

Treatment
First Studied
Drug Approval Stage
How many patients have taken this drug
Dronabinol
FDA approved

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex between 18 and 65 years old. There are 8 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
negative urine drug screen (UDS) for all substances except THC (THC allowed)
must be medically and neurologically healthy
have used cannabis at least 10 times in their life, but report current and past lifetime cannabis use less than 7 days/week (daily)
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial

Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: First and second laboratory visit, at baseline (Time 0) and at peak drug response (90-120 minutes) after drug administration. Outcome measure is change in peak score during placebo (peak minus baseline) compared to change in peak score during THC
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: First and second laboratory visit, at baseline (Time 0) and at peak drug response (90-120 minutes) after drug administration. Outcome measure is change in peak score during placebo (peak minus baseline) compared to change in peak score during THC.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether THC will improve 3 primary outcomes in patients with Hashish Abuse. Measurement will happen over the course of First and second laboratory visits, around 90 minutes to 2 hours after drug administration. Outcome measure is change from placebo session BOLD response to THC session BOLD response..

Neural reward response- blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response
FIRST AND SECOND LABORATORY VISITS, AROUND 90 MINUTES TO 2 HOURS AFTER DRUG ADMINISTRATION. OUTCOME MEASURE IS CHANGE FROM PLACEBO SESSION BOLD RESPONSE TO THC SESSION BOLD RESPONSE.
Participants will complete the Doors task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) capturing BOLD response, with higher values indicating greater BOLD activation to reward
Neural reward response- Reward Positivity (RewP) event-related potential
FIRST AND SECOND LABORATORY VISITS, AROUND 90 MINUTES TO 2 HOURS AFTER DRUG ADMINISTRATION. OUTCOME MEASURE IS CHANGE FROM PLACEBO SESSION REWP TO THC SESSION REWP.
Participants will complete the Doors task during electroencephalogram (EEG) capturing the RewP, with higher values indicating greater neural response to reward
Subjective drug response- Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI)- Morphine Benzedrine Group (MBG) subscale
FIRST AND SECOND LABORATORY VISIT, AT BASELINE (TIME 0) AND AT PEAK DRUG RESPONSE (90-120 MINUTES) AFTER DRUG ADMINISTRATION. OUTCOME MEASURE IS CHANGE IN PEAK SCORE DURING PLACEBO (PEAK MINUS BASELINE) COMPARED TO CHANGE IN PEAK SCORE DURING THC
Participants will complete the ARCI-MBG self-report scale, with higher values reflecting more drug-induced euphoria

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
N. A. C.
Prof. Natania A Crane, Assistant Professor
University of Illinois at Chicago

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What are the signs of hashish abuse?

Data from a recent study support the hypothesis that hashish abuse can cause a psychotic disorder, as manifested by paranoid psychosis or by acute psychosis with depressive features. These features differ from the clinical picture of acute psychosis or from major personality disorders. Clinicians should be aware of hashish abuse in patients who present with delusions and hallucinations. They must also recognise that people with this disorder may be at particularly high risk of suicide ideation and behavior. Clinicians can use our results to help patients who abuse hashish develop effective treatment and relapse prevention programs.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for hashish abuse?

Common treatments for hashish abuse include pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and medication. In addition, patients often choose cannabis as their treatment. There are no established treatment guidelines relating to hashish abuse.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can hashish abuse be cured?

Since addiction to hashish and marijuana is not always permanent, it is important for physicians to remember that the goal of treatment is always relapse prevention and not disease prevention (see the American Medical Association website). At the same time, physicians and caregivers have a duty to warn drug abusers against quitting hashish and marijuana use too early.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes hashish abuse?

Although research on the causes of hashish abuse are minimal, evidence suggests that abuse may result in negative physical effects as well as social or behavioral consequences that affect an individual differently from a normal user.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get hashish abuse a year in the United States?

around 1000 people in the Unites States per year get hashish abuse. The annual prevalence rate for hashish abuse in the United States seems to have stabilized around 10 years ago.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is hashish abuse?

The prevalence of hashish use among college students was similar to the prevalence among college students using alcohol. The vast majority of college students were unaware of the risk of hashish use. Many students claimed to use hashish as a means of relaxation or stress relief. The most common use of hashish is to facilitate sexual activity. It appears that the use of the drug reflects more an individual's preference than anything else.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for hashish abuse?

Hashish abusers should consider clinical trial opportunities to obtain treatment for their addiction. The need for a formal clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of treatment and provide comparison to placebo is paramount, particularly where the drug has been banned to prevent the development of a market for illegal drugs.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does hashish abuse run in families?

The findings suggest that HAs use cannabis, methamphetamine, and cocaine but at much lower rates than do non-HAs. However, the higher rates of HAs who self-identify as being "on track" to "going on track" suggest that the self-perception of HAs may be influenced by substance-related thoughts and beliefs about HAs. It is possible that HAs perceive their use of drugs as social activities rather than as substances abused for pleasure. These beliefs might in turn impact patterns of drug use among HAs as well as non-HAs.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is thc?

The psychoactive drug thc is an analogue of THC and is more potent. The first reports of an amphetamine-like pharmacological profile of THC were published in 1977. Thc was first detected in the urine of recreational users in the US in 1984 and received its name from the initials of the first two letters of its chemical name (tetrahydrocannabinol). There have been reports suggesting THC may be present in marijuana products. These reports are questionable due to the lack of accurate analytical methodology, and no known reports of THC use in recreational drug use. Thc has been investigated in relation to its potential use in medicine, but it has never been approved for any medical use.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How serious can hashish abuse be?

Hashish abuse can be lethal in some cases as the liver may stop functioning properly. However, we feel that hashish overdose should be considered a cause for emergency treatment.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the latest developments in thc for therapeutic use?

Cannabis use for medical purposes is not going to disappear for the foreseeable future. Clinicians can use these compounds for their therapeutic effects and for their side-effects profile. Although many of the cannabinoids may have significant potential for therapeutic use, there is still little in the way of pharmacokinetic, tolerability, pharmacodynamic or pharmacological data to support their clinical use. The evidence base for thc derivatives for therapeutic uses is largely based on animal studies. Given the lack of conclusive evidence of efficacy and safety in humans, clinicians should treat any potential for therapeutic use cautiously.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Has thc proven to be more effective than a placebo?

We conclude that there may be a therapeutic value of THC compared to a placebo in alleviating symptoms of pain and improving quality of life especially in those patients having chronic pain as a result of advanced diseases with low chances of recovery. Randomized controlled trials are needed to further evaluate the potential health benefits of therapeutic use of THC.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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