Scleroderma Clinical Trials 2024

Scleroderma Clinical Trials 2024

Scleroderma research studies recruiting patients in 2024 need your help. Receive premium care & cutting edge treatments by enrolling in scleroderma clinical trials today.

Scleroderma Clinical Trials

Here are the 6 most popular medical studies for scleroderma

Popular filter options for scleroderma trials

SSc Clinical Trials

View 24 SSc medical studies.

London, Ontario

Skin involvement for Systemic Sclerosis

Recruiting1 award2 criteria
London, Ontario

Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease characterized by autoantibodies, fibrosis and microvascular injury and endothelial cell activation that results in vascular damage. Vascular injury induces both innate and acquired immune responses resulting in fibroblast activation and organ fibrosis. SSc may target multiple organs, including: skin, lungs, heart, vascularization, kidneys, the gastrointestinal tract and musculoskeletal structures. Mortality among scleroderma patients is significant, with a 3.5 standardized mortality ratio (SMR) in studies of prevalent cases. This mortality may be increased in the early years of the disease, reaching a SMR of 4 in a multinational inception cohort. In general, treatment strategies target involved organs as early as possible to avoid damage. Many treatment options are available for each manifestation, but evidence with respect to the order of treatment is scarce. Financial costs, the lack of proper outcome measures, difficulty to recruit patients as a rare disease, all prevent the development of new big clinical trials, oppositely to other common diseases such as stroke or cancer. The heterogeneous features of SSc may make trials challenging. The current guidelines available are the British guidelines (2017) , and the updated European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) guidelines, published in 2017. Management guidelines have some gaps regarding second-line treatment, combinations and there are no proposed algorithms. With the pragmatic trials, the investigators intend to fill the gap between the complicated randomized clinical trials and the observational studies. Using the treatments that have already been proved useful in SSc, in an open-label randomized way and based on some refined expert-made algorithms, will allow the investigators to establish the order in how to use them. Patients will be offered to participate with the collection of their clinical data and, if they give their consent, they will be randomized according to the algorithms. There will be an optional part of the study consisting in the collection of blood samples and skin samples for future research.

Systemic Sclerosis Clinical Trials

View 19 Systemic Sclerosis medical studies.

London, Ontario

Skin involvement for Systemic Sclerosis

Recruiting1 award2 criteria
London, Ontario

Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease characterized by autoantibodies, fibrosis and microvascular injury and endothelial cell activation that results in vascular damage. Vascular injury induces both innate and acquired immune responses resulting in fibroblast activation and organ fibrosis. SSc may target multiple organs, including: skin, lungs, heart, vascularization, kidneys, the gastrointestinal tract and musculoskeletal structures. Mortality among scleroderma patients is significant, with a 3.5 standardized mortality ratio (SMR) in studies of prevalent cases. This mortality may be increased in the early years of the disease, reaching a SMR of 4 in a multinational inception cohort. In general, treatment strategies target involved organs as early as possible to avoid damage. Many treatment options are available for each manifestation, but evidence with respect to the order of treatment is scarce. Financial costs, the lack of proper outcome measures, difficulty to recruit patients as a rare disease, all prevent the development of new big clinical trials, oppositely to other common diseases such as stroke or cancer. The heterogeneous features of SSc may make trials challenging. The current guidelines available are the British guidelines (2017) , and the updated European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) guidelines, published in 2017. Management guidelines have some gaps regarding second-line treatment, combinations and there are no proposed algorithms. With the pragmatic trials, the investigators intend to fill the gap between the complicated randomized clinical trials and the observational studies. Using the treatments that have already been proved useful in SSc, in an open-label randomized way and based on some refined expert-made algorithms, will allow the investigators to establish the order in how to use them. Patients will be offered to participate with the collection of their clinical data and, if they give their consent, they will be randomized according to the algorithms. There will be an optional part of the study consisting in the collection of blood samples and skin samples for future research.

Scleroderma Clinical Trials With No Placebo

View 32 scleroderma medical studies that do not have a placebo group.

London, Ontario

Skin involvement for Systemic Sclerosis

Recruiting1 award2 criteria
London, Ontario

Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease characterized by autoantibodies, fibrosis and microvascular injury and endothelial cell activation that results in vascular damage. Vascular injury induces both innate and acquired immune responses resulting in fibroblast activation and organ fibrosis. SSc may target multiple organs, including: skin, lungs, heart, vascularization, kidneys, the gastrointestinal tract and musculoskeletal structures. Mortality among scleroderma patients is significant, with a 3.5 standardized mortality ratio (SMR) in studies of prevalent cases. This mortality may be increased in the early years of the disease, reaching a SMR of 4 in a multinational inception cohort. In general, treatment strategies target involved organs as early as possible to avoid damage. Many treatment options are available for each manifestation, but evidence with respect to the order of treatment is scarce. Financial costs, the lack of proper outcome measures, difficulty to recruit patients as a rare disease, all prevent the development of new big clinical trials, oppositely to other common diseases such as stroke or cancer. The heterogeneous features of SSc may make trials challenging. The current guidelines available are the British guidelines (2017) , and the updated European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) guidelines, published in 2017. Management guidelines have some gaps regarding second-line treatment, combinations and there are no proposed algorithms. With the pragmatic trials, the investigators intend to fill the gap between the complicated randomized clinical trials and the observational studies. Using the treatments that have already been proved useful in SSc, in an open-label randomized way and based on some refined expert-made algorithms, will allow the investigators to establish the order in how to use them. Patients will be offered to participate with the collection of their clinical data and, if they give their consent, they will be randomized according to the algorithms. There will be an optional part of the study consisting in the collection of blood samples and skin samples for future research.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need insurance to participate in a trial?
Almost all clinical trials will cover the cost of the 'trial drug' — so no insurance is required for this. For trials where this trial drug is given alongside an already-approved medication, there may be a cost (which your insurance would normally cover).
Is there any support for travel costs?
Many of the teams running clinical trials will cover the cost of transportation to-and-from their care center.
Will I know what medication I am taking?
This depends on the specific study. If you're worried about receiving a placebo, you can actively filter out these trials using our search.
How long do clinical trials last?
Some trials will only require a single visit, while others will continue until your disease returns. It's fairly common for a trial to last somewhere between 1 and 6 months.
Do you verify all the trials on your website?
All of the trials listed on Power have been formally registered with the US Food and Drug Administration. Beyond this, some trials on Power have been formally 'verified' if the team behind the trial has completed an additional level of verification with our team.
How quickly will I hear back from a clinical trial?
Sadly, this response time can take anywhere from 6 hours to 2 weeks. We're working hard to speed up how quickly you hear back — in general, verified trials respond to patients within a few days.

Introduction to scleroderma

What are the top hospitals conducting scleroderma research?

When it comes to conducting clinical trials for the complex autoimmune disease known as scleroderma, several top hospitals are leading the charge. In London, Canada, the Rheumatology Clinic at St. Joseph's Health Care is actively engaged in two ongoing scleroderma trials and has a total of three recorded trials dedicated to this condition. This clinic embarked on their first scleroderma trial in 2018, demonstrating their commitment to advancing knowledge and treatment options for patients suffering from this challenging disease.

Across the Atlantic Ocean in Omaha, Nebraska, two prominent medical centers are making significant contributions. The Lauritzen Outpatient Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center is currently focused on one active scleroderma trial while having previously conducted one study since recording their inaugural trial in 2023. Simultaneously, Nebraska Medicine's Dermatology Westroads facility also engages in one active scleroderma trial alongside its one historical investigation that commenced during the same year.

In Murray, Utah, the University of Utah MidValley Dermatology plays a crucial role by conducting an ongoing clinical trial for patients with scleroderma. Having initiated their first recorded study in 2020 showcases their dedication towards finding innovative solutions and improving outcomes for individuals affected by this rare condition.

Finally highlighting Mayo Clinic located amidst Arizona’s serene Scottsdale region; they not only contribute significantly to patient care but also engage actively in research endeavors against various diseases including Scleroderma.They presently have an active clinical test aimed towards tackling Sclerodermic conditions along with two previous investigations which occured respectivelyin 2011.These efforts exemplify Mayo Clinic's unwavering commitment towards providing cutting-edge treatments and improving the lives of those living with sclerosis

These leading hospitals serve as beacons of hope within the field of scleroderma research, striving tirelessly to bring about advancements that will ultimately enhance both understanding and management strategies surrounding this enigmatic disease. Each trial undertaken represents a step closer to unraveling the complexities of scleroderma and ultimately providing better outcomes for patients around the world.

Which are the best cities for scleroderma clinical trials?

When it comes to scleroderma clinical trials, several cities emerge as key players in advancing research and treatment options. Boston, Massachusetts leads the way with four active trials focusing on various interventions such as Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation, Oral Ifetroban, and Scleroderma. London, Ontario follows closely behind with three ongoing studies investigating Extracorporeal Photopheresis (ECP), Brentuximab Vedotin, and Skin involvement. Additionally, Baltimore, Maryland joins the ranks with three active trials exploring treatments like Sildenafil and Anifrolumab (subcutaneous weekly injection). These locations offer individuals diagnosed with scleroderma access to cutting-edge clinical trials that hold promise for improved care outcomes.

Which are the top treatments for scleroderma being explored in clinical trials?

Scleroderma, a challenging autoimmune condition, is currently the focus of several innovative treatments being explored in clinical trials. Extracorporeal Photopheresis (ECP) has caught researchers' attention with its potential benefits and is undergoing one active trial since its recent listing in 2023. Ixazomib, another promising treatment option for scleroderma patients, is also under investigation with one ongoing trial initiated in 2021. Sildenafil, known for its use in other conditions like erectile dysfunction, shows promise as well and has been evaluated in two all-time scleroderma trials since it was first listed back in 2010. These pioneering treatments offer hope to individuals battling this complex disease and may pave the way for improved outcomes and quality of life.

What are the most recent clinical trials for scleroderma?

Exciting advancements in scleroderma research bring hope to those affected by this challenging condition. Recently, a Phase 3 clinical trial introduced anifrolumab—a subcutaneous weekly injection—as a potential treatment for scleroderma. This promising therapy aims to address the underlying mechanisms of the disease and provide relief for patients. Additionally, studies exploring the use of COVID-19 vaccines in individuals with scleroderma have progressed into Phase 2 and Phase 3 trials, highlighting efforts towards protecting this vulnerable population during the pandemic. Another notable investigation examined sildenafil's efficacy in managing scleroderma symptoms through a Phase 2 trial conducted last September. With these groundbreaking initiatives pushing boundaries, there is renewed optimism within the field regarding improved treatment options for individuals living with scleroderma.

What scleroderma clinical trials were recently completed?

Recent advancements in the field of scleroderma have seen the completion of notable clinical trials, bringing hope for improved treatments. In November 2017, Michael Roth sponsored a trial investigating Pirfenidone (PFD) and its potential benefits in managing this complex disease. Additionally, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) completed a study involving Brentuximab Vedotin therapy back in September 2017. These significant milestones reflect ongoing efforts to explore innovative approaches towards addressing scleroderma and improving patient outcomes.