Operant conditioning of motor evoked potentials for Stroke

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
University of Houston, Houston, TX
Stroke
Operant conditioning of motor evoked potentials - Other
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Select

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether a brain injury can change the way muscles work together.

See full description

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Operant conditioning of motor evoked potentials will improve 4 primary outcomes and 1 secondary outcome in patients with Stroke. Measurement will happen over the course of Time Frame: before any training, after the 12th and 24th conditioning sessions, respectively, and 1 and 3 months after the 24th conditioning, respectively.

Month 3
Change in Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) score
Month 3
Change in Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) score
Change in force errors that occur during isometric wrist force tracking tasks
Change in intermuscular coordination patterns (ICoPs)
Change in motor evoked potential (MEP)

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

1 of 3

Trial Design

1 Treatment Group

ECR MEP conditioning - Stroke
1 of 1
Experimental Treatment

This trial requires 20 total participants across 1 different treatment group

This trial involves a single treatment. Operant Conditioning Of Motor Evoked Potentials is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

ECR MEP conditioning - Stroke
Other
MEP operant conditioning of ECR in stroke survivors

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: before any training, after the 12th and 24th conditioning sessions, respectively, and 1 and 3 months after the 24th conditioning, respectively
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly before any training, after the 12th and 24th conditioning sessions, respectively, and 1 and 3 months after the 24th conditioning, respectively for reporting.

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
J. R.
Prof. Jinsook Roh, Assistant Professor
University of Houston

Closest Location

University of Houston - Houston, TX

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 3 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
were as follows: Aged matched healthy group were required to be free of any major medical problems, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer show original
There are no known neurological injuries. show original
, Anybody aged between 40 and 75 is welcome. show original

Patient Q&A Section

How many people get stroke a year in the United States?

"Around 514,400 people in the United States will have a stroke in 2019. Around 9% of strokes occur in persons aged 65 and older. Both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are common, affecting around 1 in 50 women and 1 in 150 men. The average lifetime risk of stroke is 15.6%. Stroke occurs most abundantly in white men aged 65 and older. Around 1 in 6 survivors has disabling deficits in the arm or leg. Older persons represent the majority of stroke survivors, but about one-third of survivors are middle-aged persons. Approximately half of all stroke survivors are smokers at the time of the stroke." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What causes stroke?

"Stroke is caused by the buildup of plaque in the heart and in the blood vessels of the brain. As the plaque builds up, it hardens into a mass of calcium and phosphorus, called "cholesterol". The buildup of this substance and the narrowing (atherosclerosis) of the blood vessels that carry nutrients to the heart (coronary arteries) is what causes the blockage of the vessels and the ensuing ischemia of the myocardium (heart muscle). An underlying factor in this is a buildup of high cholesterol and blood triglycerides (fatty acids) in the arterial blood, and as a consequence, the blood vessels have narrowed as well." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for stroke?

"A majority of stroke victims are being enrolled on intravenous thrombolysis, but many are not. While this intervention reduces mortality, it is associated with several significant adverse effects. Other common treatments include mechanical thrombectomy, endovascular treatment, aspiration, angiography and carotid stenting. Most are administered by neurointensiologists. However, the use of intravenous naloxone to reverse naloxone-induced respiratory depression is also common. These are all procedures performed in the neurovascular laboratory. Aspiration and mechanical thrombectomy are performed in the interventional radiology suite. Most treatments are performed at high-volume university-based referral centers." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Can stroke be cured?

"The risk of secondary stroke is less than 1% per year, so it can be safely assumed that the majority of strokes occur in patients with prior strokes and do not affect survival. However, ischemic stroke may not be a disease that can be cured, because only about 14% of patients with lacunar stroke survive one year and approximately 26% die of stroke related causes." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is stroke?

"Stroke is the third most prevalent fatal disease, with more than 16 million people globally being affected annually. For most patients post stroke, disability and mortality rates are dependent on the degree of impairment and the duration of the stroke." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of stroke?

"Stroke can cause stroke-related symptoms that are found in both the acute or acute stage of stroke and in the subacute or chronic stage. These signs include slurred speech, weakness or numbness of the face, arms, or legs, double vision, visual field defect, or visual neglect. These symptoms, or lack of them when signs of brain lesion are suspected, may enable the clinician to begin further investigation to ascertain the diagnosis. In the chronic stage of a stroke, gait disturbances may indicate a deficit in motor control, a common symptom of a stroke. The occurrence of seizures also suggests a possibility of brain damage." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What does operant conditioning of motor evoked potentials usually treat?

"The effects of training in the FES system vary from individual to individual. The patient-to-patient variability is the main hurdle for the use of FES in clinical practice, but the current study provides some empirical data for a possible solution for optimizing the training system. The study implies that training of motor imagery can result in an improvement of MEPs in epileptics if adequate stimuli are introduced during the treatment." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Does stroke run in families?

"Many patients with stroke may have a family history of stroke. The presence or absence of a family history in both first-ever and recurrent strokes increases the probability ratio of a stroke being familial over 0.2. The presence or absence of an affected family member does not alter the prediction of familial vs non-familial stroke." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is the primary cause of stroke?

"The most important risk factors for stroke are hypertension and high cholesterol. Other risks include being overweight or obese, smoking, smoking cessation and drinking to excessive amounts." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving operant conditioning of motor evoked potentials?

"Results from a recent paper of this study provide clinical evidence that operant conditioning of MEPs could be of significant help in the rehabilitation of stroke patients." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

How does operant conditioning of motor evoked potentials work?

"As in the study of the reflex component of MEP, the conditioning procedure does not modify the MEP amplitude, but rather modifies the MEP amplitude change and may lead to learning of the MEP amplitudes." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Is operant conditioning of motor evoked potentials safe for people?

"Results of this study do not support the safety of OPCME for people after strokes, strokes with significant intracranial hemorrhage, and people with intracranial lesions located not within the medial medulla oblongata." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer
Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.
See if you qualify for this trial
Get access to this novel treatment for Stroke by sharing your contact details with the study coordinator.