Diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) for Skin Diseases

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Whitaker Clinic, Birmingham, AL
Skin Diseases
Diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) - Drug
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Select

Study Summary

Trem-1 and Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Immune Suppression

See full description

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) will improve 1 primary outcome in patients with Skin Diseases. Measurement will happen over the course of 24 hours after application.

24 hours after application
Contact hypersensitivity

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

1 of 3

Trial Design

4 Treatment Groups

Group 1 (Control No DPCP, 20 participants)
1 of 4
Group 1 (Negative Control, 20 participants)
1 of 4
Group 3 (UVB, DPCP, & Biopsy 30 participants)
1 of 4
Group 3 (UVB & Biopsy 30 participants)
1 of 4
Active Control
Experimental Treatment

This trial requires 70 total participants across 4 different treatment groups

This trial involves 4 different treatments. Diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will be divided into 2 treatment groups. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase < 1 and are in the first stage of evaluation with people.

Group 3 (UVB, DPCP, & Biopsy 30 participants)
Drug
This group of the study will require 10 visits. First and second visits will be similar to those of Group 1. The third visit will be on the 8th day, when participants will have two marked skin sites exposed to UV at 2 minimal erythemal dose (MED) on 4 days (day 8-11). After last UV exposure (11th day), one UV exposed skin site will be topically treated with a patch of DPCP. First application: A single dose of DPCP will be placed on the upper buttock for 48 hours. The seventh visit will be on the 12th day, when two skin biopsies will be taken, one from a non-UV exposed skin area and the other biopsy from the UV exposed skin site. The ninth visit will be four weeks after the first application with DPCP, participants will have DPCP re-applied on the upper inner arm. Second application: The DPCP doses will be applied to patches, which will be removed from skin exactly 6 h after second application. The tenth visit will be 48 hours after the DPCP treatment.
Group 3 (UVB & Biopsy 30 participants)
Drug
This group of the study will take approximately 10 weeks and requires 10 visits. At the first visit, blood will be collected and MED will be determined. The second visit will be 24h after UV when MED will be measured. Blood will be collected from patients at this time. The third visit will be on the 8th day. The two marked skin sites will be UV exposed at 2MED on 4 consecutive days. Days 9-11 make up the fourth, fifth, and sixth visits. Following the last UV exposure blood will be collected. A single dose of DPCP will be placed on the upper buttock for 48 hours. The seventh visit will be on the 12th day when two skin biopsies will be taken. The ninth visit will be four weeks after the sensitization with DPCP, when the upper inner arm will be treated with DPCP. Bi-fold skin thickness will be measured prior to the application of DPCP. Various DPCP doses are applied. The tenth visit will be 48 hours after the DPCP treatment. At this visit, bi-fold skin thickness will be measured.
Group 1 (Control No DPCP, 20 participants)First application: This group of the study will take approximately 2 days and requires 2 visits. At the first visit, a patch of the contact sensitizer or irritant, diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) will be applied to a two-inch square area of the skin over the upper inner arm. DPCP is available clinically and is used by dermatologists for the immunotherapy of alopecia areata and warts. The second visit will be 48 hours after the DPCP treatment. At this visit, the skin thickness will be measured using a simple spring-loaded caliper. Second application: Various DPCP doses will be applied to filter-paper-lined, 8-mm Finn Chambers as 10 μL of the appropriate concentration of DPCP in acetone to give the required dose range, increasing by 60% increments. The doses will be 1·24, 1·98, 3·17, 5·1 and 8·12 μg cm-2. In addition, a vehicle control patch loaded with 10 μL of acetone will be applied. Patches will be removed exactly 6 h after second application.
Group 1 (Negative Control, 20 participants)At the first visit, various doses of diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) are applied in acetone to give the required dose range, increasing by 60% increments. Elicitation patch is applied on the upper inner arm skin and removed by patients themselves exactly 6 hours after the application. The second visit will be 48 hours after the DPCP treatment. At this visit, the bi-fold skin thickness will be measured using a Medical Skinfold Caliper. The group1 will have only one treatment with DPCP and serve as negative controls for DPCP induced cutaneous immune responses in comparison to Group 2 and 3, which require two treatments with DPCP (sensitization and challenge) as described in the following group 2 and 3. The first reading of skin thickness prior to DPCP application serves as the baseline and the second reading after DPCP indicates an increase in skin thickness, which represents a quantitative parameter of DPCP induced immune responses.
Treatment
First Studied
Drug Approval Stage
How many patients have taken this drug
Diphencyprone
Not yet FDA approved

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 24 hours after application
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly 24 hours after application for reporting.

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
N. Y.
Prof. Nabiha Yusuf, Associate Professor
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Closest Location

Whitaker Clinic - Birmingham, AL

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 3 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Patient age 18-35
Patient able to understand requirements of the study and risks involved
Patient able to sign a consent form

Patient Q&A Section

What is skin diseases?

"Skin diseases are a diverse group of disorders, including most commonly viral and fungal infections and immune-related disorders. There are several specific skin diseases, as described below.\n" - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for skin diseases?

"Topical solutions of steroid creams (using corticosterone or corticosteroid) are a common treatment for dermatitis, but topical gels and ointments are not commonly used. In the case of psora, many patients find great therapeutic benefit from antifungal ointments or tretinoin. In addition, systemic medications like benzoyl peroxide and retinoids like tazarotene are frequently used to reduce inflammation of the skin." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Can skin diseases be cured?

"Although many skin diseases have a cure rate of up to 90% with good treatment, the long-term outlook of patients suffering from these conditions is usually poor." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

How many people get skin diseases a year in the United States?

"Over 2.8 million US adults have at least one type of skin disease each year. Dermiatry affects one out of eight of all US adults." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of skin diseases?

"Skin diseases are a source of many symptoms that clinicians may observe during a clinical encounter. This article provides common signs of various skin diseases. More information on skin diseases is provided in the appropriate chapters." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What causes skin diseases?

"Immunological diseases are the most common cause of skin lesions. Skin cancers are usually caused by environmental factors, which include infection with Human papillomavirus, ultraviolet radiation, environmental tobacco smoke, occupation, and solar radiation"" - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the common side effects of diphenylcyclopropenone (dpcp)?

"DPCP may cause common side effects such as gastrointestinal complaints, sleep disturbances and headaches; it may also cause skin rash, photosensitivity, skin irritation, and reversible hearing impairment. Allergic reactions may be a significant and life-threatening side effect. The more sensitive subjects may experience seizures and other seizure-like symptoms. To evaluate the common side effects caused by DPCP and to prevent them, this article describes the pharmacological effects of DPCP and the pharmacokinetics profile. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is diphenylcyclopropenone (dpcp)?

"DPCP is a chemical that was discovered in 1937 and is synthesized with phenol, which is a common fragrance. DPCP is used to prepare other chemicals used to produce plasticizers and plastic. Diphenylcyclopropenone is also used as a synthetic intermediate for the production of vitamin A. It can also be a precursor to other drugs, including the fungicides (itraconazole), the antimetabolites (probenecid and fluocinolone acetonide, and flumethrin), and the immunomodulators (pimavanserin, flupentixin, and eplerenone)." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Does skin diseases run in families?

"Results of this study indicated that skin disorders such as vitiligo, and nail diseases were associated with an affected family member. Vitiligo was the most important skin disease, affecting the majority of the families included in our study." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What does diphenylcyclopropenone (dpcp) usually treat?

"The term ‘used' in this report (used by patients) needs to be interpreted with care since the use of dpcp was not limited solely by symptoms of a (chronic, often uncontrolled) skin or connective tissue disorder but more likely included as a precaution to prevent the risk of further acute hypersensitivity reactions in that patient's family and/or subsequent patients. Dpcp use was largely dictated by patient wishes and expectations." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is the average age someone gets skin diseases?

"The authors concluded that in Australia, the prevalence of skin diseases increases with age, the majority of which are age dependent: skin telangiectasias and lichen planus are the most common conditions in Australian dermatology clinics, while the most common skin diseases in children are eczema and perioral abscesses. In Australia, many paediatricians, dermatologists, general practitioners and specialists have a better insight of skin diseases, but have difficulty working and communicating with paediatricians. Data from a recent study indicate an urgent need to develop guidelines for diagnosing and treating pediatric skin conditions and an integrated pathway for referrals of paediatricians for dermatological assessment." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Does diphenylcyclopropenone (dpcp) improve quality of life for those with skin diseases?

"Subjects reported a significant improvement at the end of three months on the self-reported quality of life questionnaire. DPCP did not produce a larger clinical improvement than placebo." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer
Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.
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