CLINICAL TRIAL

Attentional retraining (AR) for Relapse

Recruiting · 18 - 65 · Female · New Haven, CT

Perinatal Attentional Retraining Intervention for Smoking for Minority Women

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About the trial for Relapse

Eligible Conditions
Recurrence · Postpartum Smoking Relapse

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Attentional Retraining (AR) is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Main TreatmentA portion of participants receive this new treatment to see if it outperforms the control.
Attentional retraining (AR)
BEHAVIORAL
Control TreatmentAnother portion of participants receive the standard treatment to act as a baseline.
Visual probe (VP)
BEHAVIORAL

Eligibility

This trial is for female patients between 18 and 65 years old. There are 3 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Women who have quit smoking by the 32nd week of their pregnancy have a lower risk of having a baby with a birth defect. show original
0 indicates a lower likelihood of having postnatal depression show original
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial

Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: Up to 8 months
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: Up to 8 months.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
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- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Attentional retraining (AR) will improve 2 primary outcomes and 3 secondary outcomes in patients with Relapse. Measurement will happen over the course of Up to 6 months.

Smoking relapse
UP TO 6 MONTHS
Relapse is defined as any smoking on 7 consecutive days or smoking at least once each week over 2 consecutive weeks. Smoking history is collected with the timeline follow-back at each study visit. This is a binary yes/no outcome.
Self-reported stress
UP TO 8 MONTHS
Self-reported stress is assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale, modified to ask about daily stress, in the daily assessments delivered on the smartphone and at study visits. The mean score will be computed. Higher scores on the scale are indicative of higher stress.
Self-reported craving
UP TO 8 MONTHS
Self-reported craving is a single item that assesses craving to cigarettes on a 7-point Likert scale in the daily assessments delivered on the smartphone and at study visits. Higher scores on the 7-point Likert scale are indicative of higher cravings.
Attentional Bias toward stressrelated stimuli
UP TO 8 MONTHS
Attentional bias (AB) is assessed using the standard (unmodified) visual probe task on the smartphone and at study visits, and measured by the reaction time (RT) in milliseconds, i.e. the time it takes a participant to identify the location of the probe after presentation of the stimulus. The AB scores will be computed as the difference in RTs on trials where the probe replaced the stressrelated word vs. trials where the probe replaced the neutral word.
Attentional Bias- Smoking Related Stimuli
UP TO 8 MONTHS
Attentional bias (AB) is assessed using the standard (unmodified) visual probe task on the smartphone and study visits, and measured by the reaction time (RT) in milliseconds, i.e. the time it takes a participant to identify the location of the probe after presentation of the stimulus. The AB scores will be computed as the difference in RTs on trials where the probe replaced the smoking picture vs. trials where the probe replaced the neutral picture.

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What is relapse?

Relapses in patients with multiple relapses are very common. In our study, 44% of patients experienced relapse after a 12-month observation period, whereas 16.5% remained in a better status and 45.7% relapsed in an worse condition. The study provides a clear message for those who work hard to avoid relapse.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for relapse?

In a recent study, findings found that relapse can be prevented by integrating treatments into the recovery process. This would include the provision of psycho-education, relapse-intervention and maintenance training for families, doctors and nurses. Relapse prevention is important to patients' recovery and the development of stable recovery.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes relapse?

Relapse occurs following treatment, with a greater percentage of relapses occurring at the completion of treatment after having achieved remission. Further research in unraveling the molecular and genetic profiles related to this outcome will enhance our understanding.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get relapse a year in the United States?

People with first episode psychosis, and those currently in remission, will experience some degree of recurrent psychosis over a one year period. Overall, people experienced higher rates of relapse with the duration of time since first episode psychosis.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can relapse be cured?

Relapse is the single largest cause of death from prostate cancer. We conclude that even with very low rates of relapse, a cure is highly unlikely. However, with ongoing treatment and evolving treatment approaches, a cure for relapse will become more feasible.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of relapse?

Symptoms of relapse vary according to the nature of the disorder; and for each symptom there is different information and assessment required. Therefore, the identification of a relapse in an individual is based on the symptoms as reported by the patient. This information can then be used to help manage relapse, for example to develop strategies to manage emotional symptoms and to deal with behavioural problems.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the primary cause of relapse?

Findings from a recent study are consistent with previous studies in which the magnitude of change in symptom severity after a relapse is greater than that experienced with disease remission/control or with spontaneous remission.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Has attentional retraining (ar) proven to be more effective than a placebo?

The effectiveness of ar (compared with placebo) was supported by changes in attention. Findings add to the growing evidence for attentional retraining's efficacy in treating ADHD and the need to address attention in treatment of OCD.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What does attentional retraining (ar) usually treat?

It is difficult to attribute specific effects of attentional retraining to other factors. Future studies should use more objective measures of attentional processes and measures of outcomes of treatment, preferably over a longer time-frame. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for relapse?

There is a wide inter-center variability in clinical trial response rates in relapsed Ewing sarcoma. Inclusion in clinical trials is strongly associated with a good clinical response to treatment. Clinical trials are a viable treatment option, at least for Ewing sarcoma patients.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does relapse run in families?

Relapse to symptoms may occur in family members of patients with the same clinical disease and sub-clinical disease. This suggests that factors in the familial environment, or the disease phenotype, are involved in relapse.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the latest research for relapse?

Research continues to address two remaining major clinical questions. First, how and when will patients with nonrelapsing-remitting MS develop relapses, and second, how will relapsing remitting patients develop relapses? [www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/newscenter/Release/29_November_2002?pid=13710&nav_pos=189&search_terms=relapses#topic=relapses;status=RELEVE.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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