SZaMN Block for Opioids Use

Phase-Based Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Lucille Packard Children's Hospital, Palo Alto, CA
+2 More
SZaMN Block - Procedure
Eligibility
< 65
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Opioids Use

Study Summary

SZMN Blocks for Pain Control in Pediatric Patients Undergoing T&A

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Eligible Conditions

  • Pain, Postoperative
  • Opioids Use
  • Postoperative Pain

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Estimate

1 of 3

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether SZaMN Block will improve 1 primary outcome and 1 secondary outcome in patients with Opioids Use. Measurement will happen over the course of 2-3 days after surgery.

2-3 days after surgery
Opioid Consumption
Post Surgical Pain

Trial Safety

Safety Estimate

1 of 3

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Control
SZaMN Treatment Group

This trial requires 50 total participants across 2 different treatment groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. SZaMN Block is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

SZaMN Treatment Group
Procedure
Patients randomized into the SZaMN-treatment group will receive a bilateral single injection SZaMN block under general anesthesia in the operating room. The injection will occur through the pterygomaxillary fissure into the pterygomaxillary fossa. Patients will receive 5 ml of local anesthestic per side.
ControlNo treatment in the control group

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 2-3 days after surgery
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly 2-3 days after surgery for reporting.

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
C. B. T.
Prof. Chi-Ho Ban Tsui, Professor
Stanford University

Closest Location

Lucille Packard Children's Hospital - Palo Alto, CA

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 65 and younger. There are 3 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
I give consent to participate in this study. show original
Ages 0-18
Patients undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy

Patient Q&A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

Can pain, postoperative be cured?

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Pain cannot be cured in a large proportion of cases. It can be reduced, but not erased. The reduction is often significant enough that patients and their partners feel the benefits. Further investigations on the nature and efficacy of interventions that reduce pain and the factors that influence such outcomes are needed.

Unverified Answer

What causes pain, postoperative?

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While we think the pain was usually caused by the disease itself, we cannot completely rule out the possibility of the pain being caused by the treatment of the disease; we only conclude that the pain is usually caused by the disease itself, although it is possible that the pain is caused by the treatment of the disease.

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What is pain, postoperative?

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Pain is common and debilitating for the period after surgery, especially after major surgical, long-term pain, which may cause long-term health problems. The pain management technique should be developed carefully. The postoperative pain at the 1st postoperative day and the analgesics dosage should be individually determined.

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of pain, postoperative?

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In general, patients recovering from surgery experience pain. Most patients with pain require at least one analgesic. However, only 15.6% of lumbar facet arthrodesis patients required opioid analgesia. Most patients with postoperative pain had minimal evidence of inflammation or disease recurrence.

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for pain, postoperative?

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Most patients who have postoperative pain following surgery receive topical analgesics, such as topical lidocaine, with or without narcotic medication. Other common treatments include oral analgesics such as paracetamol (acetaminophen), codeine, and others, such as paracetamol and codeine combined with oral gabapentin, and acetaminophen or other NSAIDs in combination with opioid medication. Opioid medications are also common, used for both postoperative pain relief and as a rescue therapy for refractory cases.

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How many people get pain, postoperative a year in the United States?

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Almost 30 million US adults have at least one postoperative opioid-associated complication, with more than 1 million having a permanent opioid-associated neurological disorder. These estimates should make clinicians realize that [pain management](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/pain-management) in patients undergoing major surgical procedures is a significant challenge to clinical practice. Future research is required to develop better pain-management techniques and strategies to aid surgeons and general practitioners in postoperative pain care.

Unverified Answer

What are the latest developments in szamn block for therapeutic use?

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The Szamn Block is a good solution for maintaining the postoperative analgesia of patients in the post-operative period without the need of a constant administration of epidural morphine.

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Does szamn block improve quality of life for those with pain, postoperative?

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In this sample of women that suffered from severe acute or [chronic pain](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/chronic-pain) after a surgical procedure, Szamn was able to control pain and improve quality of life. This improved QoL was associated with better treatment satisfaction and improved HRQOL. Szamn may be an appropriate non-opioid analgesic option in this patient cohort.

Unverified Answer

How serious can pain, postoperative be?

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The seriousness of postoperative nausea, vomiting and pain should not deter people from having surgery if there's no medical reason to refuse (eg, the urgency of surgery is more important than these symptoms). As the severity of symptoms can be serious and sometimes irreversible, this can be a major health decision that ought not to be deferred. As such, surgery should always be considered. If the risk-benefit ratio of surgery does not fall into the acceptable range, a patient with this complication could potentially never agree to surgery. Pain, postoperative vomiting are highly related to other health issues (such as depression), and therefore, are common medical reasons to seek help or see the doctor.

Unverified Answer

Has szamn block proven to be more effective than a placebo?

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Szam block provided analgesia to most subjects. There was no significant difference in the amount of analgesic requirements between the Szam block group and placebo group. However, there was a trend towards quicker recovery in the former group.

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Is szamn block typically used in combination with any other treatments?

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Szamn block with anesthetic plus local anesthetic, opioids and NSAIDs was the most common combination of treatments in our series. The low-velocity injection with the least painful techniques and, in part, the less-specific anesthetic agents were the most frequently used techniques in combination treatments in our study.

Unverified Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for pain, postoperative?

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Pain and postoperative pain are frequent symptoms after non-cancer surgery. In our opinion, all patients after major surgical operation should be offered to participate in clinical trials.

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