Experimental (Weight Stigma) Arm for Obesity

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
Obesity
Weight stigma intervention - Behavioral
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
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Study Summary

The study will use a between-subjects design in a sample of individuals with BMI greater than or equal to 28 from the Los Angeles community (N=330). Participants will be randomly assigned to a weight stigma vs. control manipulation. Changes to the following health behaviors will be subsequently measured in their everyday lives: 3-day diet as captured by ecological momentary assessment (EMA) food diaries, objectively measured eating of obesogenic foods, objectively measured physical activity captured by 24-hour actigraphy, and sleep, captured objectively by overnight actigraphy and subjectively self-reported sleep measures. The investigators hypothesize that weight stigma causes decrements in health behaviors (e.g., sleep, eating, and physical activity) in everyday life.

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Study Objectives

7 Primary · 0 Secondary · Reporting Duration: Change in sleep efficiency will be assessed by measuring sleep efficiency for three days before the intervention as part of the baseline, and three days after the intervention.

Hour 72
Change in physical activity
Hour 72
Change in self-reported dietary intake
Hour 72
Change in self-reported sleep quality
Change in sleep duration will be assessed by measuring sleep duration for three days before the intervention as part of the baseline, and three days after the intervention.
Change in sleep duration
Change in sleep efficiency will be assessed by measuring sleep efficiency for three days before the intervention as part of the baseline, and three days after the intervention.
Change in sleep efficiency
Change in sleep onset latency will be assessed by measuring sleep onset latency for three days before the intervention as part of the baseline, and three days after the intervention.
Change in sleep onset latency
Hyperpalatable food intake will be measured directly after the intervention.
Hyperpalatable food intake

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

1 of 3

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Control Arm
1 of 2
Experimental (Weight Stigma) Arm
1 of 2
Active Control
Experimental Treatment

330 Total Participants · 2 Treatment Groups

Primary Treatment: Experimental (Weight Stigma) Arm · No Placebo Group · N/A

Experimental (Weight Stigma) Arm
Behavioral
Experimental Group · 1 Intervention: Weight stigma intervention · Intervention Types: Behavioral
Control ArmNoIntervention Group · 1 Intervention: Control Arm · Intervention Types:

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: change in sleep efficiency will be assessed by measuring sleep efficiency for three days before the intervention as part of the baseline, and three days after the intervention.

Trial Background

Prof. A. Janet Tomiyama, Associate Professor
Principal Investigator
University of California, Los Angeles
Closest Location: University of California, Los Angeles · Los Angeles, CA
Photo of Los Angeles  1Photo of Los Angeles  2Photo of Los Angeles  3
2004First Recorded Clinical Trial
4 TrialsResearching Obesity
216 CompletedClinical Trials

Eligibility Criteria

Age 18+ · All Participants · 3 Total Inclusion Criteria

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
You have a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 28.

About The Reviewer

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 9th, 2021

Last Reviewed: August 12th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.