Exercise for Coronary Disease

Phase-Based Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Canada
Coronary Disease+5 More
Exercise - Behavioral
Eligibility
18+
Female
Eligible conditions
Coronary Disease

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether high-intensity interval training is more effective than moderate-intensity continuous exercise training in improving exercise capacity and quality of life in women with coronary heart disease.

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Eligible Conditions

  • Coronary Disease
  • Myocardial Ischemia
  • Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Heart Diseases
  • Coronary Artery Disease
  • Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Estimate

1 of 3

Compared to trials

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Exercise will improve 1 primary outcome, 11 secondary outcomes, and 1 other outcome in patients with Coronary Disease. Measurement will happen over the course of from baseline to week-6 and from baseline to week-12.

Week 26
Anxiety
COVID-19 Signs and Symptoms, Complications and Treatments
Depression
Disease-specific Quality of Life, global health, physical and emotional health
Gender
Overall self-efficacy for exercise
Physical activity enjoyment
Physical activity levels
Self-determined motivation for exercise
Vital Signs
body composition
physical and mental health
from baseline to week-6 and from baseline to week-12
Change in Exercise capacity

Trial Safety

Safety Estimate

1 of 3

Compared to trials

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

No Control Group
standard care + high-intensity interval training

This trial requires 172 total participants across 2 different treatment groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Exercise is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will be divided into 2 treatment groups. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

standard care + high-intensity interval training
Behavioral
2 days/week Warm-up: 60-70% peak HR - 10min Training: 85-95% peak HR - 25 minutes (4x4-minutes of high-intensity intervals interspersed with 3 minutes of low-intensity intervals) Cool-down: 60-70% peak HR - 10min
standard care + moderate-intensity continuous exercise training
Behavioral
2 days/week Warm-up: 60-70% peak HR - 10min Training: 70-85% peak HR - 35min Cool-down: 60-70% peak HR - 15min
Treatment
First Studied
Drug Approval Stage
How many patients have taken this drug
Exercise
2016
Completed Phase 1
~1010

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: from baseline to 12 weeks and baseline to 26 weeks
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly from baseline to 12 weeks and baseline to 26 weeks for reporting.

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
J. R.
Jennifer Reed, Principal Investigator
Ottawa Heart Institute Research Corporation

Closest Location

University of Ottawa Heart Institute - Ottawa, Canada

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for female patients aged 18 and older. There are 3 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Women with CHD (e.g. CABG or PCI at least 4 weeks but less than 12 weeks post event or procedure; acute myocardial infarction; or, stable angina with corroborating evidence of CHD);
Patient is able to perform a symptom-limited CPET (this is needed to determine peak HR for the exercise training prescription); and
Patient is able to read and understand English or French.

Patient Q&A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What are the signs of coronary disease?

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Cardiovascular disease may manifest as acute, non-specific chest pain, dizziness, fatigue, breathlessness, feeling short of air, palpitations, paleness, chest discomfort, feeling fainting, heart palpitations, headaches, high blood pressure, or a slow pulse. More serious symptoms include angina, aneurysm, a heart attack (acute coronary syndrome), or a heart block.

Unverified Answer

Can coronary disease be cured?

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The majority of people who undergo primary CAVB will receive no adverse consequences. The main challenge for patients undergoing this elective procedure is that the risk of future problems increases during the immediate post-operative period. Thus, we have a choice between accepting the inherent risks or seeking alternative treatment options.

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What causes coronary disease?

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Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in the western world. Many risk factors are known, but it is still unclear how these factors affect the extent of coronary artery disease. This paper focuses on some factors which may increase the risk of coronary artery disease in the general population. At present the main clinical risks for coronary artery disease are high blood pressure.

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for coronary disease?

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The most common treatment for CHD (and also for angioplasty) is percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). For patients who undergo PCI, this is followed by coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). A significant number of patients require concomitant interventions of the two major procedures.

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How many people get coronary disease a year in the United States?

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In the United States, around 12.2 million adults have at least one major cardiac event each year. This makes up 4.9% of all American adults.

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What is coronary disease?

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[Coronary artery disease (CAD) is an inflammatory disease of the wall of the arteries that supply oxygen and nutrients to the heart muscle. It is also the leading cause of deaths around the world. The disease starts with the buildup of plaque, which in turn leads to coronary artery atherosclerosis, which then leads to coronary artery disease.(https://eMedicine.com)] It can be prevented with diet changes and exercise. One of the benefits of exercise is to raise one's heart rate, which helps flush out the plaque from the coronary arteries. As I said in the title of this article, heart-related diseases are among the most serious because they put an irreversible limit on one's life expectancy.

Unverified Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for coronary disease?

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Patients have a good understanding of the benefits of clinical trials. However, they will not always consider clinical trials if they are not aware of their high risk. Therefore, when patients must decide about receiving clinical trials, it is important to make them aware of their high risk of complications. One option is that patients should be asked to choose from several clinical trials. Patients must also be made aware that clinical trials are not a cure, and that patients will continue to be monitored even after participation.

Unverified Answer

What are the latest developments in exercise for therapeutic use?

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Currently, the majority of clinical research seems to focus on developing a more effective and longer lasting method than conventional exercise for the rehabilitation of patients with CAD.

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Does coronary disease run in families?

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Results from a recent paper suggest that hereditary factors are at least as important as environmental ones in determining a positive family history of CAD.

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What is the average age someone gets coronary disease?

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Data from a recent study suggest that the average age of onset for coronary disease increases during the age interval from 40 to 85 years. These data suggest the need for early screening of coronary risk factors in this age range.

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What is the primary cause of coronary disease?

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Although the overall prevalence of atherosclerosis increased with age, age alone was not a potent predictor of clinically significant disease. Although atherosclerotic disease was more commonly found in men than in women, the two groups had similar risks and survival. This was particularly true for myocardial disease. Atherosclerotic disease occurred in men and women with coronary disease at similar rates. Thus we believe that coronary disease, in both men and women, is more probably a multifactorial disorder.

Unverified Answer

What are the common side effects of exercise?

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In addition to an increased risk of death from accidents and cardiac disease, excessive exercise results in a host of systemic health issues which can include fatigue and other musculoskeletal discomfort.

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