CBT intervention for cancer-related fatigue for Fatigue

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada
Fatigue+2 More
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to manage cancer-related fatigue - Behavioral
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
What conditions do you have?
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Study Summary

Cancer related fatigue (CRF) has been defined as a "distressing, persistent, subjective sense of tiredness or exhaustion related to cancer or cancer treatment that is not proportional to recent activity and interferes with usual functioning". CRF has been found to affect between 59-99% of patients undergoing active treatment. Approximately a third of cancer survivors will continue to experience moderate to severe fatigue upwards of 10 years post-diagnosis. Given the prominence of CRF, guidelines for the assessment and management of CRF have been developed, including guidelines by the Canadian Association for Psychosocial Oncology (CAPO). Despite the availability of guidelines for CRF and a plethora of interventions that have demonstrated effectiveness in aiding patients manage CRF, implementation has been lacking. The objective of this study is to adapt, implement, and evaluate an already existing intervention for CRF in the community using the Knowledge-to-Action framework. This study is an implementation study and evaluation of an evidence-based cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention for CRF in a community setting. An evident knowledge to practice gap exists for CRF management in Ottawa, Canada. Through partnership with a community organization, the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation, and an emphasis on long-term sustainability, this project aims to provide more accessible treatment for cancer survivors who are experiencing CRF in the Ottawa region.

Eligible Conditions

  • Fatigue
  • CBT
  • Malignancies

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Study Objectives

2 Primary · 11 Secondary · Reporting Duration: Changes in physical activity at 1 month after the completion of the intervention

Month 1
Changes in baseline depression and anxiety at 1 month
Month 3
Changes in baseline depression and anxiety at 3 months
Month 1
Changes in baseline fatigue at 1 month
Changes in baseline fatigue at one month
Month 3
Changes in baseline fatigue at 3 months month
Changes in baseline fatigue at three months
Month 1
Changes in baseline insomnia at 1 month
Month 3
Changes in baseline insomnia at 3 month
Month 1
Changes in baseline physical activity at 1 month
Month 3
Changes in baseline physical activity at 3 months
Month 1
Changes in baseline self-efficacy at 1 month
Month 3
Changes in baseline self-efficacy at 3 months
Month 1
Satisfaction with the intervention

Trial Safety

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Wait-list control group
1 of 2
CBT intervention for cancer-related fatigue
1 of 2
Active Control
Experimental Treatment

50 Total Participants · 2 Treatment Groups

Primary Treatment: CBT intervention for cancer-related fatigue · No Placebo Group · N/A

CBT intervention for cancer-related fatigue
Behavioral
Experimental Group · 1 Intervention: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to manage cancer-related fatigue · Intervention Types: Behavioral
Wait-list control groupNoIntervention Group · 1 Intervention: Wait-list control group · Intervention Types:

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: changes in physical activity at 1 month after the completion of the intervention

Trial Background

Prof. Sophie Lebel, Professor
Principal Investigator
University of Ottawa
Closest Location: University of Ottawa · Ottawa, Canada
Photo of Ottawa  1Photo of Ottawa  2Photo of Ottawa  3
2004First Recorded Clinical Trial
1 TrialsResearching Fatigue
30 CompletedClinical Trials

Eligibility Criteria

Age 18+ · All Participants · 5 Total Inclusion Criteria

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
You are aged 18 years or over.
You have received a cancer diagnosis.
You have completed cancer treatment.

About The Reviewer

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 9th, 2021

Last Reviewed: August 12th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.