Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration (EBUS-TFNA) for Lung Cancer

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
London Health Sciences Centre - London Regional Cancer Program, London, Canada
Lung Cancer+2 More
Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration (EBUS-TFNA) - Procedure
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Select

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether a procedure called endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration (EBUS-TFNA) or transesophageal ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is useful for determining the extent of nodal disease

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Eligible Conditions

  • Lung Cancer
  • Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC)

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Lung Cancer

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration (EBUS-TFNA) will improve 1 primary outcome and 5 secondary outcomes in patients with Lung Cancer. Measurement will happen over the course of 2 years.

2 years
Changes to treatment intent and/or plan
Determine the proportion of patients with complications of endoscopic procedure
Determine the proportion of patients with occult mediastinal metastasis
Determine the sensitivity and specificity of radiologic staging of hilar/mediastinal lymph nodes
Identify the nodal stations sampled
Identify the total number of lymph nodes sampled per procedure

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Lung Cancer

Trial Design

1 Treatment Group

Treatment Arm
1 of 1
Experimental Treatment

This trial requires 29 total participants across 1 different treatment group

This trial involves a single treatment. Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Transbronchial Fine Needle Aspiration (EBUS-TFNA) is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Treatment ArmSmall pieces of suspicious chest lymph nodes will be removed with a procedure called endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration (EBUS-TFNA) or transesophageal ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA).

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 2 years
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly 2 years for reporting.

Closest Location

London Health Sciences Centre - London Regional Cancer Program - London, Canada

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 7 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Multi-disciplinary tumour boards should recommend radical treatments for all tumour sites show original
, who are fit for radical radiotherapy, may be considered for induction therapy with nivolumab Patients with oligometastatic NSCLC who are fit for radical radiotherapy may be considered for induction therapy with nivolumab show original
) The individual has a good performance status and a life expectancy of at least six months, as determined by the enrolling physician. show original
CT or MRI of the brain, with or without contrast, and a CT or MRI of the chest and/or abdomen, with or without contrast, may be performed in order to evaluate the patient's condition show original
Someone who is 18 years or older is considered to be an adult. show original
Pathologic confirmation of NSCLC
The patient has had staging investigations done within the last 3 months. show original

Patient Q&A Section

Can carcinoma, non-small-cell lung be cured?

"Carcinoma, non-small-cell lung can be cured--but in our patients with advanced disease--survivors have significant morbidity. To date, only 3 randomized controlled trials in advanced disease have demonstrated a survival difference, which makes cure an elusive goal for many patients." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"CNCI and CC are two separate but morphologically similar malignancies. Both CNCI and CC exhibit a strong tendency towards metastasis. CNCI and CC are both highly curable by chemotherapy alone. Because of this strong tendency for metastasis, CNCI and CC are treated as a single entity, with a corresponding change in treatment guidelines." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What causes carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"In a recent study, findings most cases of NSCLC were diagnosed in smokers, but cigarette smoking was not the only factor for development of the tumors. Cigarette smoking is the most common cause of NSCLC in developed countries, but its contribution to the carcinogenicity of other environmental carcinogens in this cancer is not clear." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"There are multiple options for treatment of carcinoma, non-small-cell lung, including surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapies. Surgery often offers the only option. Radiation therapy may help shrink the size and growth of the tumor and can have a longer term effect on survival. Chemotherapy often helps control or slow the spread of cancer after it has been detected. Targeted therapies provide a more specific mode of action. Some cancer treatments are being tested for a future role in treatment. In many cases specific clinical trials are testing these potential drugs." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

How many people get carcinoma, non-small-cell lung a year in the United States?

"In the present study, 1 in 60 men was diagnosed with NSCLC, with the rate increasing with age. Overall, the incidence of NSCLC was greater in blacks versus whites and in men who were current smokers." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"It is the author's opinion that most of the signs listed in this article may be useful to improve the clinical diagnosis of carcinoma, non-small-cell lung." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is the primary cause of carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"In the United States, the most common forms of cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancer, are now both due to tobacco, but the proportion of all cancers due to any single factor has declined. The proportion due to alcohol has increased by a small amount. While this is a small change, if the proportion of deaths caused by cancer is to be reduced in the future, these changes in the distribution of factors in cancer will be important. The current trends are likely to affect the number of new cases of cancer, and the rate of cancer cases among current smokers. There is a risk of increasing the rates of cancers associated with second-hand smoke. However, the rates of disease associated with occupational factors are likely to decrease." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Is endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration (ebus-tfna) safe for people?

"The risk of pneumonia following endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration of the lung is less than previous estimates and similar across all age groups, with a low false-negative rate and excellent specificity but low sensitivity." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"The overall response rate for the pooled chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy regimens combined with chemotherapy was 67.2% (58.6% in EGFR positive; 81.4% in EGFR negative); and 43% (33.05% in EGFR positive; 45.11% in EGFR negative), which is reasonable for the standard of clinical practice. The response rate for the pooled chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy regimens combined with chemotherapy was 50.4% (52.6% in EGFR positive; 45.7% in EGFR negative); and 36.7% (31.5% in EGFR positive; 40.1% in EGFR negative), which is reasonable for clinical practice." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

How does endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration (ebus-tfna) work?

"BNFNA with EUS imaging alone was able to obtain sufficient cellularity in a high proportion of patients with cancer. This is likely due to ultrasound image-guided localization of the lesion which is thought to reduce the risk of tracheobronchial tree perforation due to EUS ultrasound. In addition, EUS guided aspiration of small lesions in the trachea is feasible and useful in achieving cytological diagnostic adequacy in an endoscopic, ambulatory setting." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the latest developments in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration (ebus-tfna) for therapeutic use?

"There is a recent development in ebus-tfna for therapeutic use, which is used by clinicians and pathologists to diagnose malignancy at early stages, such as cancers of the lung, oesophagus, and liver. Its potential is as yet to be fully understood." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Does endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration (ebus-tfna) improve quality of life for those with carcinoma, non-small-cell lung?

"The patients with moderate and severe symptoms can be treated by EUS-TFNA without worsening the quality of life. As we found a trend toward a greater response with EUS-TFNA compared to EUS, we feel EUS-TFNA can be used as part of the diagnostic workup." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer
Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.
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