Treatment for Schizophrenia

Phase-Based Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
UCSF, San Francisco, CA
Schizophrenia
Eligibility
18 - 65
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Schizophrenia

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether a new type of brain stimulation may help improve self-agency in individuals with schizophrenia.

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Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Estimate

1 of 3

Compared to trials

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Treatment will improve 4 primary outcomes and 3 secondary outcomes in patients with Schizophrenia. Measurement will happen over the course of From baseline, to immediately after TMS, up to 1 week.

Week 4
Clinical Symptom Change after TMS vs Baseline (metrics units of severity)
Cognition Change after TMS vs Baseline (metrics units of accuracy and speed of processing)
Daily Functioning Change after TMS vs. Baseline (metrics of functioning)
Week 1
MEGI Neural Activity Change related to Self-Agency during Reality Monitoring after TMS vs Baseline (metrics of neural beta activation units)
MEGI Neural Activity Change related to Self-Agency during Speech Monitoring after TMS vs Baseline (metrics of neural beta activation units)
Self-Agency Behavioral Change during Reality Monitoring after TMS vs Baseline (metrics of accuracy)
Self-Agency Behavioral Change during Speech Monitoring after TMS vs Baseline (metrics of speech perturbation units)

Trial Safety

Safety Estimate

1 of 3

Compared to trials

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Medial Prefrontal TMS
Placebo group

This trial requires 160 total participants across 2 different treatment groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Treatment is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. Some patients will receive a placebo treatment. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Medial Prefrontal TMS
Device
10 Hz High frequency TMS applied to the mPFC
Posterior Superior Temporal TMS
Device
10 Hz high frequency TMS applied to the pSTS

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: from baseline to immediate and distal time points after tms, up to 4 weeks
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly from baseline to immediate and distal time points after tms, up to 4 weeks for reporting.

Closest Location

UCSF - San Francisco, CA

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex between 18 and 65 years old. There are 7 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
No neurological disorder
Meets MRI criteria
There is no current alcohol or substance use disorder. show original
The study found that the longer a person is diagnosed with schizophrenia, the more likely they are to experience a range of negative outcomes show original
Good general physical health
for many English is the first language for many people. show original
, is a predictor of longer-term remission in first episode psychosis Clinical stability, defined as 12 weeks outpatient status and 4 weeks low to moderate dose of antipsychotic medication (<1000 mg show original

Patient Q&A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

Can schizophrenia be cured?

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In current clinical medicine at this stage, the results support a diagnosis of schizophrenia not only based on a clinical history, but also on the presence or absence of psychotic symptoms.

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What causes schizophrenia?

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Since we all have experienced, we all may agree that there is something within our culture and our environment that makes schizophrenia’s evolution more difficult to prevent. For some, this may have been true even before our evolutionary history has taken place and it is perhaps the presence of the dopamine hypothesis. If there is no real or imagined ‘evolutionary advantage of schizophrenia, then why did it evolve in the first place? The fact is, in a way, both a real and a perceived ‘evolutionary advantage’ may be present. Perhaps schizophrenia's evolutionary advantages or disadvantages are more a source of conflict or conflict resolution than it’s being a biological disease ‘by-product’ of evolution.

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What is schizophrenia?

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Schizophrenia is a mental illness characterized by abnormal thinking, behavior, and social relationships. Schizophrenia is a chronic disorder and is usually lifelong. Although the rate remains the same for males and females, males are typically diagnosed earlier and have a more severe course when diagnosed than females. Schizophrenia is found worldwide and most commonly occurs in adolescence or early adulthood in the West.\n

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How many people get schizophrenia a year in the United States?

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The first psychotic episode can occur already by the age of 16 in about half of all adolescents. Men and women have similar lifetime rates of psychosis. The rate per 100,000 inhabitants per year is 1.3 for men and 1.1 for women.

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What are the signs of schizophrenia?

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Symptoms included hallucinations, delusions, disorganized speech, difficulty in maintaining attention, and lack of emotional control. Symptoms can last for days or even months, and appear, resolve and reappear to a varying extent. Symptoms can differ for those with the schizophrenic or schizoaffective disorder.

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What are common treatments for schizophrenia?

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The current focus of psychiatric treatment is mainly symptomatic and is based on an exclusionary approach. Attention focused on the individual, the community, and research could lead to a shift from a conventional psychiatric model in the treatment of schizophrenia towards a'systems approach'. Inclusion of interpersonal components in psychiatric care could enable a better assessment of quality of life and reduce the risks associated with 'adverse' drugs' and medication side-effects. It is important to address interpersonal problems such as shame and anger in psychiatric care.

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Have there been other clinical trials involving treatment?

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There have been two other major trials evaluating clozapine in schizophrenic patients. No major difference was observed between clozapine and placebo in the primary outcome measures in either trial.

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What are the common side effects of treatment?

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The common side effects of antipsychotic treatment include the following: extrapyramidal side effects (motor symptoms), movement disorders, sedation, tardive dyskinesia, hyperprolactinaemia, weight gain and other metabolic disorders, movement disorders, neurological effects, extrapyramidal side effects, and dyskinesia. Side effects and adverse drug reactions of antipsychotic agents are more significant than the side effects of benzodiazepines or other drugs. This situation is worsened by their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, and treatment of the underlying cause of the side effects that antipsychotic agents cause.

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What is the primary cause of schizophrenia?

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A number of potential etiologies of schizophrenia exist, and although the evidence of a single cause of schizophrenia is limited, the evidence for viral infection is strong. While the most widely accepted theory of schizophrenia is the dopamine hypothesis, it is not the only possibility in the etiology and there may be other factors at work. In particular, evidence has been reported that a common allele for mania associated with the serine protease S100B protein is associated with mania. The link between genetics and schizophrenia may be more apparent with more sensitive methods in the search for a clue to the disease mechanism.

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Is treatment safe for people?

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The use of medication can have negative side effects, including an increased risk of developing cancer and of premature death. Many individuals with schizophrenia experience problems when they are deprived of medication. The lack of this crucial support can lead to further relapse. The consequences of medication are potentially disastrous; if used as is by those who are not fully qualified in proper care, some of the potentially hazardous side effects of medication will be missed. Although there is clear evidence that medication can help some people, people must be fully informed of the potential risks and the risks outweigh the benefits of treatment. Effective education about the risks and benefit of medication may have a significant effect on people's decision to continue or to discontinue medication.

Unverified Answer

What is the average age someone gets schizophrenia?

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Although the median age of onset for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is ~24 years, the distribution of age at onset is decidedly skewed as compared with general populations based on studies in the US, Norway, Australia, and New Zealand. A disproportionately high proportion (~50%) of young patients will have onset of psychosis in a preadolescent age span (<15 years).

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What are the latest developments in treatment for therapeutic use?

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There are several drug treatments for schizophrenia, that have shown promise of effectiveness in trials. The benefits of antipsychotics and mood stabilizers are most reliable of all. The combination of antipsychotics and a mood stabilizer may reduce symptoms of schizophrenia by almost 50%.

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