Dexcom continuous glucose monitor for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus+2 More
Dexcom continuous glucose monitor - Device
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
What conditions do you have?
Select

Study Summary

This trial will test whether a continuous glucose monitoring device is helpful for people with type 2 diabetes who are not taking insulin. The Dexcom continuous glucose monitor is being used to treat Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in this trial, and there is no placebo group. This device has been FDA-approved for another condition in the past.

Eligible Conditions

  • Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Study Objectives

3 Primary · 11 Secondary · Reporting Duration: 0, 30, 60, 90 days

0 and 90 days
Change in Blood pressure from automated cuff
Change in Body mass index from height and weight
Change in Hemoglobin A1c from blood test
Change in High density lipoprotein cholesterol from blood test
Change in Low density lipoprotein cholesterol from blood test
Change in Total cholesterol from blood test
Change in Triglycerides from blood test
Day 90
Change in average glucose levels as measured by continuous glucose monitor
Change in glucose variability as measured by continuous glucose monitor
Change in time in range as measured by continuous glucose monitor
90 days
Glucose Monitoring Satisfaction Survey
International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)
Picture Your Plate dietary assessment questionnaire
Type 2 Diabetes Distress Screening Scale (T2-DDAS)

Trial Safety

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Blinded
1 of 2
Unblinded
1 of 2
Active Control
Experimental Treatment

50 Total Participants · 2 Treatment Groups

Primary Treatment: Dexcom continuous glucose monitor · No Placebo Group · N/A

Unblinded
Device
Experimental Group · 1 Intervention: Dexcom continuous glucose monitor · Intervention Types: Device
BlindedNoIntervention Group · 1 Intervention: Blinded · Intervention Types:
Treatment
First Studied
Drug Approval Stage
How many patients have taken this drug
Dexcom continuous glucose monitor
2018
N/A
~110

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 0, 30, 60, 90 days
Closest Location: University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center · Cleveland, OH
Photo of university hospitals cleveland medical center 1Photo of university hospitals cleveland medical center 2Photo of university hospitals cleveland medical center 3
2011First Recorded Clinical Trial
2 TrialsResearching Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
173 CompletedClinical Trials

Who is running the clinical trial?

University Hospitals Cleveland Medical CenterLead Sponsor
297 Previous Clinical Trials
336,219 Total Patients Enrolled
2 Trials studying Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
740 Patients Enrolled for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
DexCom, Inc.Industry Sponsor
121 Previous Clinical Trials
13,065 Total Patients Enrolled
4 Trials studying Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
247 Patients Enrolled for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Ian J. Neeland, MDLead Sponsor
Ian Neeland, MDPrincipal InvestigatorUniversity Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
2 Previous Clinical Trials
640 Total Patients Enrolled
1 Trials studying Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
600 Patients Enrolled for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Eligibility Criteria

Age 18+ · All Participants · 5 Total Inclusion Criteria

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that is characterized by high blood sugar levels.
You have access to a smartphone device.\n

About The Reviewer

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 9th, 2021

Last Reviewed: August 12th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.