CLINICAL TRIAL

Motivationally Enhanced Compensatory Cognitive Training for Cognitive Decline

Recruiting · 18+ · All Sexes · San Diego, CA

This study is evaluating whether a type of cognitive training may help older veterans with mild cognitive impairment.

See full description

About the trial for Cognitive Decline

Eligible Conditions
Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) · Cognitive Dysfunction

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Motivationally Enhanced Compensatory Cognitive Training is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Main TreatmentA portion of participants receive this new treatment to see if it outperforms the control.
Motivationally Enhanced Compensatory Cognitive Training
BEHAVIORAL
Control TreatmentAnother portion of participants receive the standard treatment to act as a baseline.
Goal-focused Supportive Contact
BEHAVIORAL

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 10 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
One possible reason for the decline in cognitive functioning that has been observed recently is that people are not getting enough exercise show original
The study participants were willing to be recorded during the sessions. show original
executive function
memory
The ability to use language and visuospatial abilities to think, plan, and solve problems. show original
to participate in the study will be offered screening for cognitive impairment show original
Independently living
According to the previously published criteria, the individual meets the criteria for MCI. show original
Please pay attention show original
Cognitive impairment in one or more of the following domains
View All
Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial
Similar Trials

Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: baseline, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 21 weeks
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: baseline, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 21 weeks
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: baseline, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 21 weeks.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Motivationally Enhanced Compensatory Cognitive Training will improve 2 primary outcomes and 7 secondary outcomes in patients with Cognitive Decline. Measurement will happen over the course of baseline, 8 weeks, 21 weeks.

Change in Objective cognitive performance composite z score
BASELINE, 8 WEEKS, 21 WEEKS
Change in composite z score
BASELINE, 8 WEEKS, 21 WEEKS
Change in Functional capacity performance composite z score
BASELINE, 8 WEEKS, 21 WEEKS
Change in composite z score
BASELINE, 8 WEEKS, 21 WEEKS
Change in Portland Cognitive Strategies Scale
BASELINE, 4, 8, 21 WEEKS
Change in total score
BASELINE, 4, 8, 21 WEEKS
Change in CHAMPS Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Adults
BASELINE, 4, 8, 21 WEEKS
Change in total score
BASELINE, 4, 8, 21 WEEKS
Change in Everyday Cognition Scale
BASELINE, 4, 8, 21 WEEKS
Change in total score
BASELINE, 4, 8, 21 WEEKS
Change in Subjective Everyday Functioning Composite Score (Average total score across Applied Cognition Executive Function and Applied Cognition General Concerns scales)
BASELINE, 4, 8, 21 WEEKS
Change in average total score
BASELINE, 4, 8, 21 WEEKS
See More

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What are the signs of cognitive decline?

Cognitive decline presents as [memory complaints] [increased forgetfulness] that become [severe] [depressed] in the elderly. Clinicians need to understand and recognize the signs of cognitive decline. The easiest way to do this is to visit the ADNI homepageand review the Cognitive Decline in Late Life article. The most informative and important part of the article for patients and caregivers is on the [symptoms of dementia (AD)](https://www.medscape.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can cognitive decline be cured?

Cognitive decline in late life cannot be completely reversed. However, by halting the cognitive decline, the degree can be reduced, and so can the risk for developing dementia.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is cognitive decline?

Patients who perceive their cognitive function declining do not necessarily have brain atrophy. Therefore, the diagnosis of cognitive decline should not be interpreted as a diagnosis of brain atrophy.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes cognitive decline?

Cognitive impairment is often due to multiple factors, including a range of cardiovascular illnesses, chronic disease, psychosocial factors, and medical illness. An individualized, integrated approach to prevention and care is necessary to optimize outcomes.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for cognitive decline?

This review provides an overview of current treatment for major causes of cognitive decline. While some therapies have significant benefit, there is still need for research to find better solutions to cognitive decline.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get cognitive decline a year in the United States?

About a million women and men older than 85 years experience cognitive decline each year. Subjects with high levels of depressive symptoms and cognitive decline were twice as likely to report being cared for by others, compared to subjects without high levels of depressive symptoms. In the United States, the annual number of new diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease, dementia, and of the dementing condition cognitive impairment increases substantially after the age of 75.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does motivationally enhanced compensatory cognitive training improve quality of life for those with cognitive decline?

Findings from a recent study suggest that compensatory cognitive training may be an effective way to enhance HRQOL in individuals with a diagnosis of cognitive decline.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What does motivationally enhanced compensatory cognitive training usually treat?

Findings from a recent study suggest that motivation (especially in cognitive training) is important in the clinical improvement of people with PDD. Findings from a recent study show that the use of a novel approach, combining training with motivation enhancement, might be a more effective treatment than traditional cognitive training in PD in terms of clinical motor outcomes.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How serious can cognitive decline be?

Cognitive decline among persons over 66 years old can pose clinically significant problems, particularly if it has progressed over the past few years. Early diagnosis and careful management of any underlying illnesses, as well as treatment of the cognitive dysfunction in people with normal cognitive function, could reduce the likelihood or severity of future problems.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does cognitive decline run in families?

Genetic factors play a significant role in age-related cognitive impairment, but specific genes associated with Alzheimer's disease have yet to be identified. However, evidence has emerged in support of the family history of cognitive impairment-Alzheimer's disease and the familial pattern of age-related cognitive change. Future research must pursue a multigenerational approach, and evaluate multiple genes, genetic factors, and environmental factors concurrently over multiple time points in individuals within a family with regard to age-related cognitive decline.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been any new discoveries for treating cognitive decline?

There are many ways the brain can fail. There are not many treatments to treat cognitive decline. Some of these treatments can help, but some of them are not effective. In some clinical trials, there are cognitive functioning tests used to gauge cognition status and the test results have to be compared to a control group to see if the treatments have worked. For example, one study looked at the effects of methylphenidate on memory performance, comparing it to a placebo. Another study assessed the effects of a very small dose of methylphenidate on an amalgam population. There is a possibility that these drugs could be able to help, but not enough evidence exists to recommend one over another.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the latest research for cognitive decline?

In a recent study, findings of many clinical trials that have been completed over the last decade are conflicting. Further studies are needed to determine what causes cognitive decline, how it can be prevented and how it affects quality of life. (http://www.ncbionline.org/pmid/22909710/).

Anonymous Patient Answer
See if you qualify for this trial
Get access to this novel treatment for Cognitive Decline by sharing your contact details with the study coordinator.