CLINICAL TRIAL

Quality-of-Life Assessment for Breast Cancer

1 Prior Treatment
Metastatic
Recurrent
Waitlist Available · 18+ · Female · Buffalo, NY

This study is evaluating whether a breast cancer pathways program can improve quality of life for patients with breast cancer.

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About the trial for Breast Cancer

Eligible Conditions
Breast Carcinoma · Anatomic Stage IV Breast Cancer AJCC v8 · Recurrent Breast Carcinoma · Carcinoma · Breast Neoplasms · Metastatic Breast Carcinoma · Prognostic Stage IV Breast Cancer AJCC v8

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Quality-of-Life Assessment is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Main TreatmentA portion of participants receive this new treatment to see if it outperforms the control.
Quality-of-Life Assessment
OTHER
Informational Intervention
OTHER
Survey Administration
OTHER
Control TreatmentAnother portion of participants receive the standard treatment to act as a baseline.
Quality-of-Life Assessment
OTHER
Informational Intervention
OTHER
Survey Administration
OTHER

Eligibility

This trial is for female patients aged 18 and older. You must have received 1 prior treatment for Breast Cancer or one of the other 6 conditions listed above. There are 4 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Will receive their chemotherapy at Roswell Park sites in Buffalo or Amherst, New York (NY), or Roswell Park Oncology primary care (PC) sites in Niagara Falls, Amherst, West Seneca, or Jamestown NY
Treatment includes intravenous chemotherapy for breast cancer for primary disease as neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy, or for recurrent and/or metastatic cancer
Can provide consent
Are able to comprehend written materials in English or Spanish
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial
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Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: Up to 2 years
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: Up to 2 years
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: Up to 2 years.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Quality-of-Life Assessment will improve 3 primary outcomes in patients with Breast Cancer. Measurement will happen over the course of Baseline and 8 weeks.

Change in Patient quality of decision
BASELINE AND 8 WEEKS
Assessed by surveys
BASELINE AND 8 WEEKS
change in Patient quality of life
BASELINE AND 8 WEEKS
Assessed by surveys.
BASELINE AND 8 WEEKS
Number of physician visits and diagnostic tests
UP TO 2 YEARS
UP TO 2 YEARS

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What causes breast cancer?

Cancer can have many causes, including genetic mutations, nutritional factors, environmental toxins, family history, and lifestyle choices. The cause of cancer is an active area of research because there are many possible targets for cancer prevention and treatment.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for breast cancer?

Breast cancer is treated with surgery, radio- and chemotherapeutic agents and hormonotherapy. More aggressive mastectomy, the removal of the entire breast plus the lining tissue, is often performed to achieve a complete resection, especially in cases where chemotherapy is used. Surgical staging is often required to determine the spread of the cancer. Surgery, particularly mastectomy, is the treatment of choice for women with breast cancer.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer is more common in younger women than in older women. The occurrence of breast cancer is not triggered by any single event; rather the probability is affected by a number of environmental or genetic factors. At any one time, about 7 out of 10 women with breast cancer will have been affected by it in their lifetime, and of these women nearly all of them will have been under the age of 50.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of breast cancer?

Symptoms of breast cancer vary, but can be painful, a lump under the skin and/or redness and warmth of the area. These can lead to problems for patients with breast cancer. Signs like these can affect daily functioning, for example reduced activity. The more signs, the worse the prognosis. In other words, the higher the quantity, the higher the likelihood that your breast cancer will progress, and the less quality of life you can expect.\n

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get breast cancer a year in the United States?

A substantial fraction of people with [breast cancer](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/breast-cancer) will die within 5 or 10 years, so many patients will be diagnosed after 5 or 10 years have passed since their initial cancer.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can breast cancer be cured?

Breast cancer, although being a complex disease, can be cured if all parts are found and removed at the time of diagnosis and the cancer has been thoroughly treated and all symptoms present at the time of diagnosis of the cancer have been addressed.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the chances of developing breast cancer?

About 1 in 10 women are at some lifetime risk for being diagnosed with breast cancer. The risk level can differ by age, family history and medical examination history. The lifetime risk is most strongly linked with the presence of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in the families. It is of value to understand the age-related increase in breast cancer risk.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving informational intervention?

A minority of existing trials of informational interventions are reported in reputable peer-reviewed publications. More research is needed to explore these programs' effects on a variety of clinical and surrogate outcomes.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is informational intervention?

The use of a mobile phone application was an effective means of increasing health information and improving breast cancer self-diagnosis. The study was conducted on an adult population and the results may not be applicable to younger women and those in low socioeconomic groups where breast cancer is less prevalent.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Is informational intervention typically used in combination with any other treatments?

The findings indicate that informational intervention only has a positive effect when combined with other forms of treatment, such as surgery or radiation. Hence, it seems advisable to include the informational intervention as an element in a larger treatment plan. However, it still remains to be determined which type of informational intervention (such as informational booklets or a web page) offers the highest gain for patients and health care providers, as well as for the health system.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the primary cause of breast cancer?

As well as being the most common breast cancer among women under 40, it is an oft-quoted fact that it makes up more than 65% of all cases diagnosed in those in their 30s and 40s. I think it's important to keep this knowledge in mind when I address the issue of breast cancer research. (from the official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the "Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology")\nThere are many hypotheses as to why we develop and how we contract breast cancer. Some hypotheses focus on environmental exposures, such as diet, alcohol intake, or hormone levels, while others focus on genetics, e.g.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does breast cancer run in families?

Although familial occurrence of breast cancer is infrequent, this study has demonstrated an increase in breast cancer risk among relatives of breast cancer patients. This warrants further clarification on the mechanism of this genetic predisposition to familial breast cancer, as this risk may be amenable to lifestyle modification.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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