Resonance breathing for Binge Drinking

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ
Binge Drinking
Resonance breathing - Behavioral
Eligibility
18 - 65
All Sexes
What conditions do you have?
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Study Summary

Conscious attempts to regulate alcohol use are often undermined by automatic attention and arousal processes activated by alcohol cues, as well as by diminished ability to inhibit in-the-moment behaviors. The current study will examine whether a brief behavioral intervention of slow breathing paced at a resonance frequency of the cardiovascular system can interrupt automatic alcohol cue reactivity and enhance cognitive control in binge drinkers. Results from the proposed study may provide new prevention and intervention targets to interrupt unhealthy drinking behaviors.

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Binge Drinking

Study Objectives

10 Primary · 0 Secondary · Reporting Duration: Immediate; Difference between the active resonance breathing compared to the low demand cognitive task occurring one week apart

Immediate; Difference between the active resonance breathing compared to the low demand cognitive task occurring one week apart
N2 ERP amplitude (in microvolts) elicited from an Alcohol Cued Go/No-Go task
N2 ERP latency (in milliseconds) elicited from an Alcohol Cued Go/No-Go task
N2pc ERP amplitude (in microvolts) elicited from a visual dot probe detection task
N2pc ERP latency (in milliseconds) elicited from a visual dot probe detection task
P3b ERP amplitude (in microvolts) elicited from a picture-viewing task
P3b ERP latency (in milliseconds) elicited from a picture-viewing task
Reaction time from the behavioral response during the Alcohol Cued Go/No-Go task
Reaction time from the behavioral response during the visual dot probe detection task
Task accuracy from the behavioral response during the Alcohol Cued Go/No-Go task
Task accuracy from the behavioral response during the visual dot probe detection task

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Binge Drinking

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Low demand vanilla control
1 of 2
Resonance paced breathing
1 of 2
Active Control
Experimental Treatment

100 Total Participants · 2 Treatment Groups

Primary Treatment: Resonance breathing · No Placebo Group · N/A

Resonance paced breathing
Behavioral
Experimental Group · 1 Intervention: Resonance breathing · Intervention Types: Behavioral
Low demand vanilla control
Behavioral
ActiveComparator Group · 1 Intervention: Low demand cognitive task · Intervention Types: Behavioral

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: immediate; difference between the active resonance breathing compared to the low demand cognitive task occurring one week apart
Closest Location: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey · New Brunswick, NJ
Photo of new jersey 1Photo of new jersey 2Photo of new jersey 3
2015First Recorded Clinical Trial
1 TrialsResearching Binge Drinking
9 CompletedClinical Trials

Who is running the clinical trial?

Rutgers, The State University of New JerseyLead Sponsor
361 Previous Clinical Trials
60,087 Total Patients Enrolled
Brandon L Alderman, Ph.D.Principal InvestigatorRutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Marsha E Bates, Ph.D.Principal InvestigatorRutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Eligibility Criteria

Age 18 - 65 · All Participants · 2 Total Inclusion Criteria

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
You have had at least two binge drinking episodes in the past month.
You have normal or corrected-to-normal vision.

About The Reviewer

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 9th, 2021

Last Reviewed: August 12th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.