CLINICAL TRIAL

Treatment for Alzheimer Disease

Recruiting · 18+ · All Sexes · Boston, MA

This study is evaluating whether non-invasive brain stimulation may help improve episodic memory.

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About the trial for Alzheimer Disease

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 3 different treatments. Treatment is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Control Group 1
transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS)
DEVICE
Control Group 2
transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS)
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Control Group 3
transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS)
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Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 10 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
who have been diagnosed with cognitive impairment (based in MoCA or TICS and Clinical Dementia Rating: CDR)
Understanding of the ICF will be assessed by asking the participant to answer the following three questions: 1) What is the purpose of this study? 2) What are the risks of study involvement? 3) If you decide to participate, are you allowed to withdraw from the study at any time? Answers will be recorded by study personnel on the "Assessment of Protocol Understanding" form . Insufficient understanding will be defined by one or more incorrect answers, as determined at the discretion of the investigator.
Understanding of the ICF will be assessed by asking the participant to answer the following three questions: 1) What is the purpose of this study? 2) What are the risks of study involvement? 3) If you decide to participate, are you allowed to withdraw from the study at any time? Answers will be recorded by study personnel on the "Assessment of Protocol Understanding" form. Insufficient understanding will be defined by one or more incorrect answers, as determined at the discretion of the investigator.
age 55+
age 21-35
without any cognitive impairment (based on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment: MoCA - in-person screening or Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status: TICS - phone screening)
age 55+ without any cognitive impairment (based in MoCA or TICS)
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial
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Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: 3 lab-visits will occur at least 2 days apart within one month
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: 3 lab-visits will occur at least 2 days apart within one month.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Treatment will improve 2 primary outcomes in patients with Alzheimer Disease. Measurement will happen over the course of 3 lab-visits will occur at least 2 days apart within one month.

Spatiotemporal dynamic changes measured with electroencephalography (EEG)
3 LAB-VISITS WILL OCCUR AT LEAST 2 DAYS APART WITHIN ONE MONTH
Changes in spatiotemporal dynamics in different frequency bands (theta, alpha, beta, gamma) will be assessed with high density - hdEEG after tACS intervention (gamma, theta, sham)
Behavioral performance measured with Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA)
3 LAB-VISITS WILL OCCUR AT LEAST 2 DAYS APART WITHIN ONE MONTH
Changes in behavioral performance will be assessed using Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) after tACS intervention (gamma, theta, sham)

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
A. P.
Alvaro Pascual-Leone, Senior Scientist
Hebrew SeniorLife

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What are the signs of alzheimer disease?

Alzheimer disease can be diagnosed if symptoms are severe and are indicative of cognitive impairment. The presence of memory impairment, semantic clumsiness, disorientation or impaired judgment in combination with the history of a family history of Alzheimer disease is particularly indicative of this disease.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can alzheimer disease be cured?

Currently, no treatments are known that have been demonstrated to reduce the risk of developing AD. However, most individuals who have developed AD remain intellectually and physically intact for a long time, and it is possible that the disease could be effectively treated in the future.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is alzheimer disease?

Alzheimer's disease affects people around the world in various countries. It is a progressive disease whose earliest symptoms may not show themselves until the later stages. It is a disease with a number of different clinical manifestations which can be classified differently by specific cognitive impairment and clinical features.\n

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for alzheimer disease?

There is a variety of treatment modalities and the management of patients with AD usually includes pharmaceutical agents, physical therapy, and counseling. The management options for AD are highly variable, but there are general guidelines that can help inform treatment decisions.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get alzheimer disease a year in the United States?

Results from a recent paper shows that dementia cases diagnosed in the US are on the rise. This increase may be partly due to the expanding use of screening tests such as the MMSE, a rising age at diagnosis, and to name a few, the aging of our population. Results from a recent paper, women were diagnosed with Al-Zo on a almost one to one basis with the male patients. The findings of this study call into question the ability to generalize beyond our own population when investigating the prevalence of Alzheimer. Results from a recent paper, it was found that women in the sample were diagnosed at an earlier age; women diagnosed at an earlier age diagnosed at a lower age on average than men, a phenomenon known as the female diagnostic latency.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes alzheimer disease?

Almost everyone who lives longer than the age of 80 may develop Alzheimer's disease, which has long been an elusive and neglected disease. While the exact causes of Alzheimer's disease remain unexplained, it is believed to involve a number of factors including genetics, environmental toxicity, neuroinflammation, and oxidative stress.\n

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving treatment?

There are few clinical trials with treatment options for Alzheimer patients. In particular, some treatments such as acupuncture and tDCS have been used in clinical studies with contradictory results, suggesting possible negative effects on patients. Currently, trials concerning tDCS remain experimental, but the only treatments of tDCS approved for use by some of the world's most renowned universities are a method for treating dystonia.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the latest developments in treatment for therapeutic use?

A number of novel treatments are still being studied in a range of disease types, including Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. It is likely to be many years before effective therapies can be made available. The development of novel therapies is a complex and long process requiring an understanding of the disease process in order to produce efficacious agents.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does alzheimer disease run in families?

In addition to previous observations that many families with a history of AD are also affected by dementia, this study suggests that a family history of AD is a risk factor for AD dementia and that multiple AD diagnoses are the most likely pattern at autopsy.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the average age someone gets alzheimer disease?

The age of onset for AD is around ages sixty-five to sixty-eight with a rising trend over the past decade. It is now generally believed that AD will begin to affect one’s memory and activities of daily life earlier. As the number of aged Americans increases, we will see an increases in the prevalence of AD cases and AD patients. This increases the challenges faced in the caregiving of an aging population.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How serious can alzheimer disease be?

The severity of the symptoms and the presence of aggressive behaviour or severe emotional distress might be associated with the presence of APOE E4 allele. Patients with APOE E4 allele may have severe Alzheimer Disease which is not associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer disease.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is treatment?

It is a misconception to think that treatment for Alzheimer's disease is merely to stop dementing. Rather, treatment is a life for an individual with Alzheimer's to live with dignity and to lead a comfortable life until the end. To be successful in Alzheimer's treatment, patients require a patient-centred approach and the ability to communicate openly and honestly with their clinician. Cognitive behavioural therapy, specifically cognitive behavioural therapy for psychophysiological problems has recently been proposed as an alternative and safe means to enhance quality of life in people with Alzheimer's. Some authors have also commented on a need for a more holistic approach not just to address cognition but the wider picture of a neurological disorder involving mental and physical functioning.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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