CLINICAL TRIAL

Trigger point injection with 1% lidocaine for Facial Pain

Recruiting · 18+ · All Sexes · Orange, CA

Trigger Point Injections Versus Lidocaine Patch for Myofascial Pain in the Emergency Department

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About the trial for Facial Pain

Eligible Conditions
Facial Pain · Emergencies · Pain, Myofacial · Myofascial Trigger Point Pain (MTrP) · Myofascial Pain Syndromes

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Trigger Point Injection With 1% Lidocaine is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase 4 and have been shown to be safe and effective in humans.

Main TreatmentA portion of participants receive this new treatment to see if it outperforms the control.
Trigger point injection with 1% lidocaine
PROCEDURE
Control TreatmentAnother portion of participants receive the standard treatment to act as a baseline.
Lidocaine patch 5%
DRUG

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 2 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
18 years or older
The patient was diagnosed with myofascial pain of the posterior neck or back based on criteria that includes a palpable taut band (trigger point) that reproduces the patient's pain. show original
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial
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Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: From initiation of the study up to the point the patient is discharged from the emergency department
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: From initiation of the study up to the point the patient is discharged from the emergency department
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: From initiation of the study up to the point the patient is discharged from the emergency department.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Trigger point injection with 1% lidocaine will improve 1 primary outcome and 3 secondary outcomes in patients with Facial Pain. Measurement will happen over the course of From initiation of the study up to the point the patient is discharged from the emergency department.

disposition times
FROM INITIATION OF THE STUDY UP TO THE POINT THE PATIENT IS DISCHARGED FROM THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
Number of minutes it takes to discharge or admit the patient from first contact
FROM INITIATION OF THE STUDY UP TO THE POINT THE PATIENT IS DISCHARGED FROM THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
use of other medications for treatment of pain including medications administered
FROM INITIATION OF THE STUDY UP TO 5 DAYS POST DISCHARGE
How often and which medications did the patient require in emergency department and upon discharge to control their pain
FROM INITIATION OF THE STUDY UP TO 5 DAYS POST DISCHARGE
absolute change in Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) of pain
0 MINUTES AND 20-MINUTES POST- TREATMENT, AND EVERY 30-60 MINUTES THEREAFTER UNTIL DISCHARGE OR ADMISSION AND WE WILL GIVE THE PATIENT A HAND OUT SO THAT THEY CAN RECORD THEIR PAIN SCORES FOR UP TO 5 DAYS AFTER THEIR EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT VISIT.
Pain on a scale of 1-10. Minimum value is 1, maximum value is 10. Higher score means higher level of pain while lower score means lower level of pain.
0 MINUTES AND 20-MINUTES POST- TREATMENT, AND EVERY 30-60 MINUTES THEREAFTER UNTIL DISCHARGE OR ADMISSION AND WE WILL GIVE THE PATIENT A HAND OUT SO THAT THEY CAN RECORD THEIR PAIN SCORES FOR UP TO 5 DAYS AFTER THEIR EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT VISIT.
satisfaction/experience surveys regarding their treatment
IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE INTERVENTION IS PERFORMED/ADMINISTERED
We will administer satisfaction/experience surveys to assess for any discomfort or relief from the intervention
IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE INTERVENTION IS PERFORMED/ADMINISTERED

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What are common treatments for facial pain?

Facial pain is a common chronic complaint and can affect the quality of life of an individual. Treatment is typically symptom-based, with a focus on pain and avoiding exacerbating conditions. The American Dental Association lists common treatments for facial pain and their effectiveness. If oral medication, dental procedures and other non-invasive techniques are not effective, more invasive, non-specific procedures may be helpful.\n

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is facial pain?

Facial pain is common (about 45% in this survey) but its underlying cause is not always identifiable. Painful temporomandibular joint may be one of its cause; it is likely common in bruxism. Pain in lower facial and neck area is more likely due to cervical spondylosis. Pain in the upper facial region is more likely due to degenerative nasolacrimal duct blockage.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes facial pain?

This review suggests that facial pain is the most common symptom of the chronic inflammatory process that causes a condition now called giant cell arteritis. Symptoms other than headache can be used to help establish the diagnosis.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can facial pain be cured?

Treatment for facial pain must be based on a patient's history and physical examination to identify any other pathology. The nature of a sore or muscle trigger can help to direct treatment. A muscle trigger of facial pain may require surgical division. Triggers are best treated with a combination of NSAIDs and paracetamol (acetaminophen).

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get facial pain a year in the United States?

Around 2.5 million people in the United States will have facial pain in 2019. More than half a million will be under 50 years old.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of facial pain?

A history of previous head or neck trauma and symptoms of facial nerve dysfunction, including a sense of weakness of a side of the face, decreased movement of a tongue, and weakness or numbness of an affected muscle are some of the signs of facial pain. Most importantly, facial pain can be a physical manifestation of psychological issues, such as PTSD or anxiety. The treatment of facial pain and associated symptoms should be done in collaboration with a psychiatrist and a plastic surgeon.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the latest research for facial pain?

Clinical research guidelines have been developed in the past decade, but most of the recent studies have included less people. Additional research, using larger sample sizes, is needed. To provide evidence-based care, healthcare providers should incorporate clinical research, not only based on research to guide decision making, but the latest research with the largest population of people possible.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Has trigger point injection with 1% lidocaine proven to be more effective than a placebo?

For people with chronic non-infective facial pain, the 1% lidocaine and 0.4% methylprednisolone injections showed a significant benefit for pain and tender point detection, but there was very low incidence of numbness.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the average age someone gets facial pain?

The average reported age of facial pain diagnosis is 55 with a wide age distribution and is greater than in the general population. In the United States, there is no national mean reported age of diagnosing facial pain among adults.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How does trigger point injection with 1% lidocaine work?

A trigger point injection in addition to the routine injections in the same spot is as effective as the routine injection in reducing pain and improving function at immediate and short-term followup.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving trigger point injection with 1% lidocaine?

These data suggest that TRM is rare and most commonly related to adverse events and is often less than 1% for both a single TR and multiple TRs (2 or more) injection. TRM is not due solely to injection.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does facial pain run in families?

In a recent study, findings of this study do not support the occurrence of facial pain as an inherited trait. In a recent study, findings support the contention that facial pain may have a psychological and non-genetic origin.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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