CLINICAL TRIAL

Treatment for Pain, Postoperative

Waitlist Available · < 18 · All Sexes · Boston, MA

Efficacy of Transversus Abdominis Plane Block for Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

See full description

About the trial for Pain, Postoperative

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Treatment is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase 3 and have had some early promising results.

Control Group 1
Ultrasound
DEVICE
+
Ropivacaine 0.2%
DRUG
+
Surgical infiltration
PROCEDURE
+
Abdominal Wall Block
PROCEDURE
+
Sterile saline
DRUG
Control Group 2
Ultrasound
DEVICE
+
Ropivacaine 0.5%
DRUG
+
Surgical infiltration
PROCEDURE
+
Abdominal Wall Block
PROCEDURE
+
Sterile saline
DRUG

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and younger. There are 6 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
The patient was five to seventeen years old at the time of surgery. show original
The parent is able to consent on behalf of the patient and the patient is able to give assent if they are over the age of seven. show original
The person has been admitted to the hospital for 24 hours. show original
ASA status 1-2
Patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy
Surgery will involve and be limited to laparoscopic cholecystectomy
View All
Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial
Similar Trials

Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: 24 hours
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 24 hours
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: 24 hours.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Treatment will improve 1 primary outcome and 5 secondary outcomes in patients with Pain, Postoperative. Measurement will happen over the course of every eight hours thereafter on the hospital floor for total of 24 hours postoperatively.

post-operative patient-reported pain scores upon arrival to the post-operative care unit and inpatient unit
EVERY EIGHT HOURS THEREAFTER ON THE HOSPITAL FLOOR FOR TOTAL OF 24 HOURS POSTOPERATIVELY
EVERY EIGHT HOURS THEREAFTER ON THE HOSPITAL FLOOR FOR TOTAL OF 24 HOURS POSTOPERATIVELY
cumulative opioid consumption (both intravenous and enteral) during the perioperative period
24 HOURS
24 HOURS
time to mobilization out of bed
24 HOURS
24 HOURS
overall patient functional recovery evidenced by validated patient surveys
24 HOURS
24 HOURS
time to first liquid and/or solid PO intake
24 HOURS
24 HOURS
post-operative episodes of opioid-related side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, constipation, urinary retention, and pruritis
24 HOURS
24 HOURS

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
K. B.
Karen Boretsky, MD
Boston Children's Hospital

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

How many people get pain, postoperative a year in the United States?

Pain of moderate to severe intensity, on a rating scale of 0 to 10 at the 6-month follow-up clinic visit, was common in children and adolescents seen for pain evaluation after surgery.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for pain, postoperative?

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are often used in both acute and chronic [pain management](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/pain-management). Their use is well-integrated in post-operative care and is widely accepted and well-tolerated, irrespective of comorbidities. Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) and tramadol are frequently used in chronic pain management and are often tolerated, but caution must be exercised if chronic long-term use or excessive tramadol dosing is necessary. The long-term use of antidepressants for the treatment of pain should be restricted to patients who do not have severe comorbid psychiatric illnesses.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is pain, postoperative?

The postoperative period is a painful, acute phase of the immediate postoperative period. Patients can benefit from multimodal pain management and optimizing pain management is important.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes pain, postoperative?

Postoperative pain is not only a natural consequence of operation, but oftentimes can be the main cause for patients to seek medical care for it. Moreover some measures can be taken to reduce postoperative postoperative pain.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can pain, postoperative be cured?

The data suggests that chronic nonmalignant pain can not be cured in the short term, however, in the medium and long term, these patients can gain meaningful pain relief.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of pain, postoperative?

Signs of postoperative pain include headache, tenderness, tightness, fatigue, and tenderness in the jaw. Tenderness may be felt anywhere in the neck. Pain will be worse in the morning and when stretching out from lying on the back. A person with pain should be sure to notify the dentist and, where applicable, other medical professionals of all current treatments. A history of headache or over-use of neck medication should lead to a reconsideration of the type and length of postoperative analgesia. Pain may mimic those of an infection or tumors can be associated with chronic pain, so long term pain may be treated aggressively.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the average age someone gets pain, postoperative?

The frequency and severity of complaints are similar among both age groups. The age group of 50-54 seems to represent the "healthy" cohort of the population at this stage of their lives. No other age group of patients is "well" enough on their own to be exempt from medical care in our practice.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is treatment?

Patients with HNC and pain may have a poor prognosis and must be carefully selected for treatment. Results from a recent paper of randomized studies of different treatments for patients with HNC and pain indicate that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are a reasonable first-line choice, although some have suggested that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be inappropriate for treating this population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs combined with paracetamol may have a more successful outcome. Randomized controlled trials of different treatments for patients with postoperative pain are needed.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How does treatment work?

Patients experiencing pain within one hour of surgery received more opioids and received more postoperative pain medication, although these findings were not statistically significant. It is possible that patients with higher pain scores do not receive surgery as early as patients with lower pain scores.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does pain, postoperative run in families?

Contrary to our hypothesis, our data suggest that there is a small to modest correlation in families of painful complications after surgery. However, a small percentage of cases with such pain is not familial for hereditary disease, and thus other explanations need to be considered for this subset. Further prospective genotypic analyses are needed to elucidate the relationship.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the primary cause of pain, postoperative?

Although pain is a very common problem that often causes tremendous suffering, it is seldom the root of the patient's motivation to seek a physician. More work, however, is needed to clarify the complex etiology of postoperative pain without the assistance of careful scientific inquiry.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been any new discoveries for treating pain, postoperative?

There are still many issues yet to be discovered. However, some of the methods are becoming more well understood, which will eventually help our lives better.

Anonymous Patient Answer
See if you qualify for this trial
Get access to this novel treatment for Pain, Postoperative by sharing your contact details with the study coordinator.