CLINICAL TRIAL

TAS1553 for Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases

Recruiting · 18+ · All Sexes · Edmonton, Canada

A Study of TAS1553 in Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and Other Myeloid Neoplasms

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About the trial for Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases

Eligible Conditions
Myeloproliferative Disorders · Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) · Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms · Neoplasms · Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases · Leukemia, Myeloid · Leukemia · Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs) · Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. TAS1553 is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will be divided into 2 treatment groups. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase 1 and are in the first stage of evaluation with people.

Experimental Group 1
TAS1553
DRUG
Experimental Group 2
TAS1553
DRUG

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. You must have received newly diagnosed for Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases or one of the other 8 conditions listed above. There are 10 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
The life expectancy of the rats will be 12 weeks or more, as assessed by the investigator. show original
Have a score of 0 to 1 on the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status scale. show original
People with R/R AML, or other myeloid neoplasms where approved therapies have failed or for whom known life-prolonging therapies are not available, are included in this study show original
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial
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Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: Up to 33 months
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: Up to 33 months.
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Trial Expert
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- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether TAS1553 will improve 4 primary outcomes and 12 secondary outcomes in patients with Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases. Measurement will happen over the course of At specific timepoints from predose up to Day 2 of Cycle 2 (28 days per cycle).

Pharmacodynamic biomarker: Change from baseline in deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP) pool levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)
AT SPECIFIC TIMEPOINTS FROM PREDOSE UP TO DAY 2 OF CYCLE 2 (28 DAYS PER CYCLE)
Pharmacodynamic biomarker: Change from baseline in phosphorylated checkpoint kinase 1 (pCHK1) levels in bone marrow
AT SPECIFIC TIMEPOINTS FROM PREDOSE UP TO DAY 2 OF CYCLE 2 (28 DAYS PER CYCLE)
Pharmacokinetic parameter: Maximum plasma concentration (Cmax)
AT SPECIFIC TIMEPOINTS FROM PREDOSE UP TO DAY 8 OF CYCLE 6 (28 DAYS PER CYCLE)
Pharmacokinetic parameter: Half-life (t½)
AT SPECIFIC TIMEPOINTS FROM PREDOSE UP TO DAY 8 OF CYCLE 6 (28 DAYS PER CYCLE)
Pharmacokinetic parameter: Area under the curve (AUC)
AT SPECIFIC TIMEPOINTS FROM PREDOSE UP TO DAY 8 OF CYCLE 6 (28 DAYS PER CYCLE)
Pharmacokinetic parameter: Minimum plasma concentration (Cmin)
AT SPECIFIC TIMEPOINTS FROM PREDOSE UP TO DAY 8 OF CYCLE 6 (28 DAYS PER CYCLE)
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Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What are common treatments for myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative diseases?

There are a small number of well characterised agents specifically used against myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative syndromes (MPS) as well as non-specific agents with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and hydroxycarbamide). Overall, a combination of these therapies is common.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative diseases a year in the United States?

About 15,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with an MDS/MPD a year, a high burden, but most suffer silently, receiving only secondary care.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative diseases?

Patients with peripheral pancytopenia are at increased risk of MDS. The prognosis of myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative disease is also poor, as they have a life expectancy of less than one year.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative diseases?

The exact cause of myelodysplastic-myeloproterative diseases is unknown. Exposure to multiple environmental stimuli is likely to influence the development of this disease. Most cases of myelodysplastic-myelopproterative disease are genetically inherited.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative diseases?

MMPD and MDS are both disorders that result from clonal mutations in the hematopoietic progenitor cells. Myelodysplastic syndromes are characterised by a low hemoglobin, low pancytopenia and normal blood cell count. On the contrary, with MDS patients, there are an increased numbers of immature neutrophil and monocyte count along with increased number of mature neutrophils in the peripheral blood. Results from a recent clinical trial support the possibility if hematopoietic stem cell mutation is responsible for the monocyte counts elevation in the blood.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative diseases be cured?

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first publication in the international literature to comprehensively cover the current advances in the treatment of MM/MPD. The reported data may provide a platform for further research.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the latest research for myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative diseases?

For patients in whom no treatment has been found, a multi-institutional collaborative effort is starting to identify prognostic markers and risk-stratifying agents. Additionally, it remains to be determined whether and in what context the use of the myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative classification classification, an international panel of pathologists has recommended for its clinical utility.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative diseases run in families?

Although MDS runs in families and a small percentage of all MDS patients in some regions have a family history of MDS, little is known about the underlying genetic mechanisms for the development of MDS in MDS families.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the primary cause of myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative diseases?

MDS seem to appear as a result of a complex interaction of genetic and physiological risks. The mechanism of MDS is not completely clear. The two main theories are aging and chronic autoimmune processes. There is no single theory explaining the formation of MDS unequivocally.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative diseases?

Clinical trials for MDS and/or leukemias are feasible, providing results for patients and physicians. The patients' preference is the only important predictor for deciding whether to participate.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How does tas1553 work?

Results from a recent clinical trial is first to show that tas1553 directly binds to DNA and downregulates a subset of NF-κB target genes and is the first report on the molecular mechanism of tas1553. Because tas1553 does not affect B lymphocyte development, these effects occur mostly at the BMP signalling pathway and not NF-κB. Future work will determine whether tas1553's anti-cancer activity (at least in part) results from its effects on B cell differentiation (at least in part).

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is tas1553?

Thus we could see tas1553 as a linker among the different functional domains with potential applications. We are still missing an understanding or hypothesis regarding to what functions the Tas1563 protein plays in the cell.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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