CLINICAL TRIAL

[18F]FluorThanatrace for Suspected Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

Metastatic
Recruiting · 18+ · Female · Philadelphia, PA

This study is evaluating whether a new imaging agent may be useful for detecting ovarian cancer.

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About the trial for Suspected Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. [18F]FluorThanatrace is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will be divided into 2 treatment groups. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase 1 and are in the first stage of evaluation with people.

Experimental Group 1
[18F]FluorThanatrace
DRUG
+
PET/CT imaging sessions
RADIATION
Experimental Group 2
[18F]FluorThanatrace
DRUG
+
PET/CT imaging sessions
RADIATION

Eligibility

This trial is for female patients aged 18 and older. There are 5 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Inclusion Criteria for Biodistribution cohort
Participants will be ≥ 18 years of age
History of known or suspected epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer (may have primary or metastatic cancer at the time of study enrollment)
At least one lesion ≥ 1.0 cm that is seen on standard imaging (e.g. CT, MRI, ultrasound, FDG PET/CT)
Participants must be informed of the investigational nature of this study and be willing to provide written informed consent and participate in this study in accordance with institutional and federal guidelines prior to study-specific procedures.
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial

Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: 3 years
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 3 years
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: 3 years.
View detailed reporting requirements
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Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether [18F]FluorThanatrace will improve 1 primary outcome in patients with Suspected Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer. Measurement will happen over the course of 3 years.

Number of Adverse Events
3 YEARS
3 YEARS

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

Have there been any new discoveries for treating suspected epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer?

The majority of new therapies aimed at treating suspected epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer are in the postchemotherapy stage, which is further proof for the current treatment practice and standards of care.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does suspected epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer run in families?

EOC was underinvestigated in the families tested. It may be that it occurs with a significant frequency outside families and is associated with known familial factors. Consideration needs to be given to screening for EOC in families of women with EOC, considering that a subset of women with EOC do not have classic EOC histology and are more susceptible to be undertreated if left untreated.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get suspected epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer a year in the United States?

About 37,500 people per year are treated for SEOC/PPOC and only 16,600 receive treatment. For comparison, the general U.S. population is estimated to have 10,000 SEOC/PPOC cases per year with about 10,000 new patients per year in the United States. This article shows how many people get SEOC/PPOC annually and what treatment is given.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can suspected epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer be cured?

Results from a recent clinical trial found no significant association between BRCA mutation and cure rate for EOC, but suggested that BRCA may play a role for cure rate of other germ cell cancers.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for suspected epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer?

There are no clear evidence-based guidelines linking treatments to specific outcomes for patients with epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. It is important that patients and clinicians have a basic understanding of the current scope of evidence and that they be informed about and understand the potential problems of treatment as well as the therapeutic opportunities to be benefited by adjuvant therapies for optimally selected patients.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is suspected epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer?

In patients presenting with epithelial ovarian carcinoma, there is a high percentage of suspicion for another ovarian tumor. Aspects of initial presentation, such as adnexal tenderness, suggest a probable second ovarian neoplasm. In this way, initial treatment aimed at ovarian carcinoma is modified when a primary or metastatic ovarian tumor is identified only late in the course of treatment.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of suspected epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer?

Patients with suspected epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer have many common clinical features. They may also have other signs such as abdominal tenderness, bowel or urinary urgency, and lower abdominal symptoms.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes suspected epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer?

EOC, EOTC, and PPC are the three most common cancers in the Netherlands. In our hospital PPC is the third most frequent cancer after M1 primary peritoneal cancer and EOC. There are significant differences between patient groups for cancer sites investigated and symptomatology. Cancer prevention of EOC and EOTC is based on the Amsterdam guidelines; cancer prevention of PPC is based on the St Gallen guidelines. PPC is the least responsive to current treatment because POCS is more aggressive malignancy. The same applies for M1 primary peritoneal cancer, and for other malignancies, such as stomach cancer.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Has [18f]fluorthanatrace proven to be more effective than a placebo?

These data suggest that [(18)F]fluorodopa is likely to be as effective as the placebo in facilitating detection of malignant ovarian cancer and detecting [18]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in [19]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake-positive malignancies.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is [18f]fluorthanatrace?

As a PET tracer, [(18)F] FAN is a useful diagnostic tool to diagnose and localize ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. It is also helpful in tracking efficacy of tumor treatments.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving [18f]fluorthanatrace?

When patients with a diagnosis of EOC were included, and when [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET is used to detect metastatic lesion within the abdomen, the addition of a [18F]fluorodopa PET/CT scan does reveal uptake in the liver. No uptake is observed in patients without metastatic disease, suggesting that a lack of [18F]fluorodopa uptake is specific for patients with metastatic disease. A subset of patients with EOC will be eligible for ongoing, prospective trials of new treatments that focus on [18F]fluorodopa metabolism within liver metastases.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Is [18f]fluorthanatrace typically used in combination with any other treatments?

Despite the advantages of [(18)F]fluorotate, such as shorter exposure time and ease of administration, no significant benefits were observed in comparison with [(18)F]FLT. The use of (18)Fluorotate or 3-deaza-(18)Fluorocytidine cannot replace conventional treatments as the only therapeutic modality, particularly in the salvage or recurrent setting.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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