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Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
Global Leader in Leukemia
Global Leader in Brain Tumor
Conducts research for Syndrome
Conducts research for Tumors
Conducts research for Neuroblastoma
1798 reported clinical trials
169 medical researchers
Photo of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in PhiladelphiaPhoto of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in PhiladelphiaPhoto of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in Philadelphia

Summary

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is a medical facility located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This center is recognized for care of Leukemia, Brain Tumor, Syndrome, Tumors, Neuroblastoma and other specialties. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is involved with conducting 1,798 clinical trials across 1,627 conditions. There are 169 research doctors associated with this hospital, such as Theodore W. Laetsch, Frank M Balis, Michael J Fisher, MD, and Nancy J Bunin, MD.

Area of expertise

1Leukemia
Global Leader
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has run 160 trials for Leukemia. Some of their research focus areas include:
CD19 positive
Stage IV
Stage II
2Brain Tumor
Global Leader
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has run 127 trials for Brain Tumor. Some of their research focus areas include:
Stage IV
NTRK positive
Stage I

Top PIs

Clinical Trials running at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Chronic Kidney Disease
Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
Rhabdomyosarcoma
Kidney Disease
Ovarian Tumors
Leukemia
Syndrome
Autism
Lymphoma
Ovarian Choriocarcinoma
Image of trial facility.

Finerenone

for Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease

Researchers are looking for a better way to treat children who have chronic kidney disease (CKD), which is long-term kidney disease, and proteinuria, a condition in which a person´s kidneys leak protein into the urine. The kidneys filter waste and fluid from the blood to form urine. In children with CKD, the kidney´s filters do not work as well as they should. This can lead to accumulation of waste and fluid in the body and proteinuria. CKD can lead to other medical problems, such as high blood pressure, also known as hypertension. Vice versa, hypertension and proteinuria can also contribute to worsening of CKD. Therefore, the treatment of CKD aims to control blood pressure and proteinuria. There are treatments available for doctors to prescribe to children with CKD and hypertension and/or proteinuria. These include "angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors" (ACEI) and "angiotensin receptor blockers" (ARB). Both ACEI and ARB can help improve kidney function by reducing the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). The RAAS is a system that works with the kidneys to control blood pressure and the balance of fluid and electrolytes in the blood. In people with CKD, the RAAS is often too active, which can impair the ability of the kidneys to work properly and cause hypertension and proteinuria. However, ACEI or ARB treatment alone does not work for all patients with CKD as they only target the angiotensin part of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The study treatment, finerenone, is expected to help control RAAS overactivation together with an ACEI or ARB. So, the researchers in this study want to learn more about whether finerenone given in addition to either an ACEI or ARB can help their kidney function. The main purpose of this study is to learn how safe the treatment is when used of finerenone in addition to an ACEI or ARB in long-term. To see how safe the treatment is, the study team will collect information on medical problems which are also known as "treatment emergent adverse events" (TEAEs). And they will also collect levels of an electrolyte called potassium in the blood by taking blood samples, and measure blood pressure during the study. The secondary purpose of this study is to learn how well long-term use of finerenone can reduce the amount of protein in the participants' urine and benefit kidney function when taken with standard of care. To see how the treatment works, the study team will collect participants' urine samples to assess urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) and urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPCR), which are important assessments for calculating the level of protein in the urine. Researchers will also collect blood samples to analyze serum creatinine and calculate estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). A significant decline in eGFR indicates worsening kidney function. The study will include participants who had previously participated in FIONA study (NCT05196035). The participants will be aged from 1 year up to 18 years. The participants will be in the study for approximately 19 months. They will take study treatment for up to 18 months and will be follow up for 1 month. During this period, at least 12 visits are planned for patients who newly start finerenone, and at least 8 visits for patients who already received finerenone. In the visit, the study team will: have their blood pressure, heart rate, temperature, height and weight measured have blood and urine samples taken have physical examinations have their heart examined by an electrocardiogram and echocardiography (a sonogram of the heart) answer questions about their medication and whether they have any adverse events, or have their parents or guardian's answer answer questions about how they are feeling, or have their parents or guardian's answer answer question about how they like the study medication, or have their parents or guardian's answer The doctors will keep track of any adverse events. An adverse event is any medical problem that a participant has during a study. Doctors keep track of all adverse events that happen in studies, even if they do not think the adverse events might be related to the study treatments. The doctors will check the participants' health about 30 days after the participants take their last treatment.
Recruiting3 awards Phase 37 criteria
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Oral Iron

for Chronic Kidney Disease

This study is evaluating whether iron supplements may help children with chronic kidney disease.
Recruiting3 awards Phase 45 criteria
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Etelcalcetide

for Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

This study is evaluating whether a drug may help treat secondary hyperparathyroidism in children with chronic kidney disease.
Recruiting2 awards Phase 38 criteria

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Frequently asked questions

What kind of research happens at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia?
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is a medical facility located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This center is recognized for care of Leukemia, Brain Tumor, Syndrome, Tumors, Neuroblastoma and other specialties. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is involved with conducting 1,798 clinical trials across 1,627 conditions. There are 169 research doctors associated with this hospital, such as Theodore W. Laetsch, Frank M Balis, Michael J Fisher, MD, and Nancy J Bunin, MD.
Where is Children's Hospital of Philadelphia located?
**Children's Hospital of Philadelphia** - **Address:** 3401 Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104 - **Public Transit Options:** Buses, subways, and trains are available. The nearest light rail station is Lancaster Av & 44th St, approximately a 19-minute walk from the hospital.
Who should I call to ask about financial aid or insurance network?
1. For assistance with applying for the Family Health Coverage Program at CHOP, contact their office to speak with a Family Health Coverage Coordinator. 2. St. Christopher's Hospital for Children offers financial assistance. Inquiries can be made at 484-628-5683. 3. Shriners Children's provides financial assistance and accepts most private insurance plans. Visit their Financial Assistance page for more details. 4. CHOP's Medical Financial Partnership program offers free tax preparation and financial counseling at their Karabots Pediatric Care Center in West Philly.
What insurance does Children's Hospital of Philadelphia accept?
**Insurance Plans Accepted at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia:** - **General:** Aetna, AmeriHealth, Blue Cross Blue Shield, CHAMP Va, Geisinger Health Plan. - **Harborview/Smithville Primary Care:** Aetna Choice POS, Choice POS II, Elect Choice, Blue Cross Blue Shield, CHAMP Va. - **Voorhees Specialty Care Center:** Aetna, AmeriHealth, Geisinger Health Plan, Oxford – Liberty and Freedom (medical diagnosis only). - **CHOP Medical Plans:** Consumer Directed Health Plan, CHOP Preferred Care Plan, Keystone/AmeriHealth HMO Plan.
What awards or recognition has Children's Hospital of Philadelphia received?
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute is a leading recipient of NIH funding for pediatric research. It has been awarded a $50 million NIH grant to explore the effects of environmental factors on pregnancy and children's health.