High-resistance inspiratory muscle strength training for Hypertension

Phase-Based Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Integrative Physiology of Aging Laboratory, Boulder, CO
+4 More
High-resistance inspiratory muscle strength training - Other
Eligibility
18+
Female
Eligible conditions
Hypertension

Study Summary

Inspiratory Muscle Strength Training for Lowering Blood Pressure and Improving Endothelial Function in Postmenopausal Women: Comparison With "Standard of Care" Aerobic Exercise

See full description

Eligible Conditions

  • Hypertension
  • Respiratory Aspiration
  • Aging
  • Blood Pressures
  • Endothelial Dysfunction

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Estimate

1 of 3

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether High-resistance inspiratory muscle strength training will improve 1 primary outcome, 2 secondary outcomes, and 8 other outcomes in patients with Hypertension. Measurement will happen over the course of 3 months.

3 months
Adherence to the intervention
Change from baseline endothelial function at 3 months
Change from baseline in ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure at 3 months
Change from baseline in casual systolic and diastolic blood pressure at 3 months
Change from baseline in endothelial cell nitric oxide production at 3 months
Change from baseline in endothelial cell oxidative stress at 3 months
Change from baseline in endothelial cell superoxide production at 3 months
Change from baseline in endothelium-independent dilation at 3 months
Change from baseline in oxidative stress-associated suppression of endothelial function at 3 months
Change from baseline in plasma concentrations of L-arginine, a substrate for nitric oxide, at 3 months
Change from baseline in plasma concentrations of dehydroascorbate, an antioxidant, at 3 months

Trial Safety

Safety Estimate

1 of 3

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Aerobic exercise
High-resistance inspiratory muscle strength training

This trial requires 90 total participants across 2 different treatment groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. High-resistance Inspiratory Muscle Strength Training is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

High-resistance inspiratory muscle strength training
Other
Using a handheld device, participants will perform 30 breaths a day at 75% of maximal inspiratory pressure, six days a week, for three months.
Aerobic exercise
Other
Participants will walk for 25 minutes a day, six days a week, for three months at a target heart rate of 40-60% heart rate reserve. Heart rate will be monitored with a heart rate monitor.

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 3 months
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly 3 months for reporting.

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
D. S.
Prof. Douglas Seals, Distinguished Professor
University of Colorado, Boulder

Closest Location

Integrative Physiology of Aging Laboratory - Boulder, CO

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for female patients aged 18 and older. There are 10 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Postmenopausal women (>12 months of amenorrhea)
Estrogen deficient (no hormone therapies within the previous 12 months)
Age 50 years and older
Ability to provide informed consent
Willing to accept random assignment to condition
Resting systolic blood pressure of 120 mmHg or greater
Body mass index <40 kg/m2
Weight stable in the prior 3 months (<2 kg weight change) and willing to remain weight stable throughout study
No change in blood pressure medications or other medications (prescription or dosing) in the prior 3 months and willing to maintain current medication regimen
Free from clinical disease with the exception of hypertension

Patient Q&A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What are common treatments for hypertension?

Add answer

A hypertensive person needs to be educated about their treatment, with patient-derived goals, self-monitoring and a set of printed or electronic reminders. Patient education and information is particularly important in treating all-comers, i.e. those, even if they present with serious co-morbidities, or are in more advanced stages of disease, especially if these may alter their lifestyle. A multidisciplinary approach should be considered.

Unverified Answer

How many people get hypertension a year in the United States?

Add answer

Around 26% of Americans over the age of 45 years are diagnosed with hypertension. In addition, hypertension carries a lifetime risk of stroke, heart attack, and heart failure. As a preventive strategy, an active program targeting individuals over the age of 45 years is recommended.

Unverified Answer

What causes hypertension?

Add answer

This is the first of its kind and it brings together the most recent advances in cardiovascular science to explain how cardiovascular illnesses and diseases cause the onset of hypertension. It includes research in genetics, metabolism, and immunity that shows how the different pathways involved in cardiovascular disease combine to accelerate an attack on the body's vasculature and stimulate the onset and worsening of vascular remodeling. This book is ideal to guide and understand why hypertension arises as a result of the complexity of diseases like cancer, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and hypertension, making it the first in a new series of scholarly books.

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of hypertension?

Add answer

Cardiac disease is one of the many diseases associated with hypertension. As such, hypertension should be regarded with great suspicion when detected. Other signs that suggest arterial hypertension include the skin being cold and clammy.

Unverified Answer

Can hypertension be cured?

Add answer

There are currently no medications that can completely eliminate the risk of developing CHD and stroke. However, lowering hypertension can significantly lower the risk of developing CHD and stroke.

Unverified Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving high-resistance inspiratory muscle strength training?

Add answer

Muscle strength training appears to be beneficial at improving a patient's level of functioning in daily life both in healthy individuals and in patients with hypertension. This training is beneficial at improving not only physical strength in patients with hypertension, but also muscle functions such as walking speed and dynamic endurance, and psychological well-being.

Unverified Answer

Have there been any new discoveries for treating hypertension?

Add answer

A more thorough understanding of the factors that contribute to portal hypertension, has allowed for more effective treatment techniques to be developed. Treatments for portal hypertension have evolved and are becoming more effective and efficient. Scientists around the world have made it their goal to understand the factors that make up portal hypertension and develop efficient techniques that will give patients better outcomes. These therapies are becoming more effective and the treatments being devised are more economical.

Unverified Answer

Does hypertension run in families?

Add answer

Hypertension is an inherited disease, and in our study, it seems to run in the families of hypertensive patients. Genetic counselling to select patients in whom more intensive preventive measures can be instituted seems to be a viable alternative to early blood pressure measurements.

Unverified Answer

What are the latest developments in high-resistance inspiratory muscle strength training for therapeutic use?

Add answer

Exercise programmes based on high-resistance inspiratory muscle strength training have been recently introduced as a therapeutic option in breath-holding patients with COPD. The present study provides the first detailed analysis of these movements, specifically their physiological adaptations. We conclude that breath-holding sessions should be continued to maintain or increase muscle strength and endurance.

Unverified Answer
See if you qualify for this trial
Get access to this novel treatment for Hypertension by sharing your contact details with the study coordinator.