Multisyllabic learning in children for Aphasia, Primary Progressive

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Boston University, Boston, MA
Aphasia, Primary Progressive+5 More
Anodal tDCS - Device
Eligibility
Any Age
All Sexes
What conditions do you have?
Select

Study Summary

Persistent developmental stuttering affects more than three million people in the United States, and it can have profound adverse effects on quality of life. Despite its prevalence and negative impact, stuttering has resisted explanation and effective treatment, due in large part to a poor understanding of the neural processing impairments underlying the disorder. The overall goal of this study is to improve understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in speech motor planning and how these are disrupted in neurogenic speech disorders, like stuttering. The investigators will do this through an integrated combination of experiments that involve speech production, functional MRI, and non-invasive brain stimulation. The study is designed to test hypotheses regarding the brain processes involved in learning and initiating new speech sound sequences and how those processes compare in persons with persistent developmental stuttering and those with typical speech development. These processes will be studied in both adults and children. Additionally, these processes will be investigated in patients with neurodegenerative speech disorders (primary progressive aphasia) to further inform the investigators understanding of the neural mechanisms that support speech motor sequence learning. Together these experiments will result in an improved account of the brain mechanisms underlying speech production in fluent speakers and individuals who stutter, thereby paving the way for the development of new therapies and technologies for addressing this disorder.

Eligible Conditions

  • Aphasia, Primary Progressive
  • Stuttering, Developmental

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Aphasia, Primary Progressive

Study Objectives

5 Primary · 5 Secondary · Reporting Duration: Evaluated during the MRI scanning procedure

Evaluated at Baseline
Forward digit span
Stuttering Severity
Working memory test scores
Evaluated at Baseline and immediately following intervention
Brain activity measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging
Change from baseline in production error rate
Change from baseline in reaction time
Change from baseline in utterance duration
Percentage of words stuttered
Evaluated during the MRI scanning procedure
Cortical morphometry
Cortical white matter connectivity

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Aphasia, Primary Progressive

Trial Design

7 Treatment Groups

Multisyllabic learning in children
1 of 7
Multisyllabic learning and fMRI in adults
1 of 7
Sub-syllabic learning and fMRI
1 of 7
Sub-syllabic learning and anodal tDCS of inferior frontal sulcus
1 of 7
Sub-syllabic learning in PPA
1 of 7
Sub-syllabic learning and anodal tDCS of cerebellum
1 of 7
Sub-syllabic learning and sham tDCS
1 of 7
Experimental Treatment
Non-Treatment Group

315 Total Participants · 7 Treatment Groups

Primary Treatment: Multisyllabic learning in children · Has Placebo Group · N/A

Multisyllabic learning in children
Behavioral
Experimental Group · 1 Intervention: Learning of novel multisyllabic nonwords · Intervention Types: Behavioral
Multisyllabic learning and fMRI in adults
Behavioral
Experimental Group · 1 Intervention: Learning of novel multisyllabic nonwords · Intervention Types: Behavioral
Sub-syllabic learning and fMRI
Behavioral
Experimental Group · 1 Intervention: Learning of non-native phoneme combinations: 6 training sessions · Intervention Types: Behavioral
Sub-syllabic learning and anodal tDCS of inferior frontal sulcusExperimental Group · 2 Interventions: Anodal tDCS, Learning of non-native phoneme combinations: 1 training session · Intervention Types: Device, Behavioral
Sub-syllabic learning in PPA
Behavioral
Experimental Group · 1 Intervention: Learning of non-native phoneme combinations: 8 training sessions · Intervention Types: Behavioral
Sub-syllabic learning and anodal tDCS of cerebellumExperimental Group · 2 Interventions: Anodal tDCS, Learning of non-native phoneme combinations: 1 training session · Intervention Types: Device, Behavioral
Sub-syllabic learning and sham tDCSShamComparator Group · 2 Interventions: Sham tDCS, Learning of non-native phoneme combinations: 1 training session · Intervention Types: Device, Behavioral
Treatment
First Studied
Drug Approval Stage
How many patients have taken this drug
Anodal tDCS
2010
Completed Phase 2
~580

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: evaluated during the mri scanning procedure

Trial Background

Prof. Frank Guenther, Professor
Principal Investigator
Boston University Charles River Campus
Closest Location: Boston University · Boston, MA
Photo of Boston  1Photo of Boston  2Photo of Boston  3
2004First Recorded Clinical Trial
1 TrialsResearching Aphasia, Primary Progressive
85 CompletedClinical Trials

Eligibility Criteria

Age Any Age · All Participants · 10 Total Inclusion Criteria

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Children who stutter will complete additional speech, language, hearing, and cognitive tests to ensure that they are within normal performance ranges for their age with the exception of stuttering for children in the children who stutter (CWS) group.

About The Reviewer

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 9th, 2021

Last Reviewed: August 12th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.