Mobile-based NAS Caregiving Tool for Passive Addiction, Neonatal

Phase-Based Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Washington State University, Spokane, WA
Passive Addiction, Neonatal+3 More
Mobile-based NAS Caregiving Tool - Behavioral
Eligibility
18+
Female
Eligible conditions
Passive Addiction, Neonatal

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether a mobile app can help prepare mothers for the challenges of caring for their newborns at risk for neonatal abstinence syndrome.

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Eligible Conditions

  • Passive Addiction, Neonatal
  • Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome
  • Syndrome
  • Opioid Abuse
  • Opioid-Related Disorders
  • Opioid Use Disorder (OUD)

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Estimate

1 of 3

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Mobile-based NAS Caregiving Tool will improve 2 primary outcomes and 7 secondary outcomes in patients with Passive Addiction, Neonatal. Measurement will happen over the course of 4, 8, & 12 weeks postpartum.

Week 12
Change in Opioid use treatment continuation
Change in maternal drug relapse
Length of newborn hospital stay
Newborn readmission
breastfeeding
maternal postpartum depression
maternal postpartum stress
maternal satisfaction with her birth experience
maternal-infant bonding

Trial Safety

Safety Estimate

1 of 3

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Control
Adapted NAS tool Intervention

This trial requires 30 total participants across 2 different treatment groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Mobile-based NAS Caregiving Tool is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Adapted NAS tool Intervention
Behavioral
Pregnant women in this condition will receive the adapted mobile-based NAS instructional tool and TAU. Women in this condition will go through the NAS instructional tool at least once during pregnancy, with their choice of going through the modules gradually while waiting at the OAT clinic to receive their dose, or by scheduling a time to review the modules. Participants will have free online access to the tool throughout their third trimester as well as through 12-weeks postpartum so they can access the modules at any time, and as many times as desired, including after giving birth.
ControlNo treatment in the control group

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 4, 8, & 12 weeks postpartum
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly 4, 8, & 12 weeks postpartum for reporting.

Closest Location

Washington State University - Spokane, WA

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for female patients aged 18 and older. You must have received 1 prior treatment for Passive Addiction, Neonatal or one of the other 3 conditions listed above. There are 3 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Pregnant woman in the third trimester currently in OAT treatment for opioid use disorder
18 years of age or older
Ability to speak and understand English.

Patient Q&A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What is passive addiction, neonatal?

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Passive addiction, neonatal, involves the establishment of a developmental state of dependence that develops in the course of postnatal life. The state is characterized by a loss of control, but can, at least in part, be reversed by withdrawal. It may be considered as a "neonatal addiction" since some features are similar to the addiction of adult rats.

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for passive addiction, neonatal?

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There are multiple different treatment options for cocaine dependence due to varying clinical presentation (severity, comorbidity, or previous treatments), as well as differing patient and provider preferences. Current medications for cocaine dependence often include N,N-diethyl-3-methoxyamphetamine (DEETM), naltrexone, and acamprosate. These drugs have high efficacy, and may be combined with other drugs (e.g. psychotherapy and psychostimulant medications) to treat cocaine dependence.

Unverified Answer

How many people get passive addiction, neonatal a year in the United States?

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Passive addiction in neonates in the United States is frequent. The prevalence of the condition is expected to continue to increase as the population ages.

Unverified Answer

What causes passive addiction, neonatal?

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Passive maternal addiction is mainly responsible for late-onset nicotine-induced addiction in newborn rats. The lack of fetal withdrawal is unlikely to occur following passive maternal smoking. The mechanism is probably due to increased activity of brain dopamine systems during the late fetal development.

Unverified Answer

Can passive addiction, neonatal be cured?

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Neonatally induced passive or maternal cocaine or heroin exposure in rats caused marked cocaine seeking that lasted for a few months, but long-term treatment with naltrexone after weaning did not eradicate overt cocaine-seeking behavior. We conclude that short exposures to neonatal cocaine or heroin do not trigger long-lasting alterations in basic brain neurochemical systems that are essential for cocaine and heroin addiction.

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of passive addiction, neonatal?

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Nausea and vomiting are common in the neonatal period and are usually associated with a serious condition. Neonatal sleep-wake patterns and feeding habits are also common. Feeding behaviour usually resolves on its own in the first week of life and sleepiness is usually noticed. When they become very sleep-disturbed or in severe cases, feeding ceases by day 10 of life. This may be due to the fact that these infants have insufficient sleep to digest solid food.

Unverified Answer

How serious can passive addiction, neonatal be?

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Passive addiction, neonatal is a [noisy] condition that can affect health, and may require a multi-disciplinary approach. The extent of this condition and the need to care for the infants are unknown. Due to the potentially severe health consequences of this condition and the need to protect infants in the neonatal unit, a multidisciplinary approach is suggested for evaluating such mothers during their pregnancies. A multidisciplinary approach should be [concurrent] with the mother and baby while the infant is being born and in the neonatal unit.

Unverified Answer

What is the primary cause of passive addiction, neonatal?

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Neonatal abstinence syndrome could be determined in a high proportion of the study population. For several parameters, we found no difference between the two groups. The authors suggest an increase of the number of cases to evaluate whether the duration of exposure to nicotine during pregnancy influences the neonatal withdrawal syndrome.

Unverified Answer

What is mobile-based nas caregiving tool?

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With support from the WHO, the Mobile Innovation Lab conducted a study with children aged 4-6 to determine the effects of a mobile-based nas caregiving tool at health facilities, community clinics, and hospitals in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Unverified Answer

How does mobile-based nas caregiving tool work?

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Results from a recent clinical trial, children experienced a higher rate of pain and more anxiety than controls. These increased pain reports were significantly decreased from the first 3 months on a mobile app, but not as effectively as with other methods of caring.

Unverified Answer

Does mobile-based nas caregiving tool improve quality of life for those with passive addiction, neonatal?

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Results from this small pilot evaluation provide preliminary evidence that mobile telephone technology can improve the quality of life and emotional well-being of babies with PA.

Unverified Answer

Is mobile-based nas caregiving tool typically used in combination with any other treatments?

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Findings from a recent study found that the use of an electronic nas caregiving tool in combination with other interventions was not associated with improvements in outcomes or cost.

Unverified Answer
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