CLINICAL TRIAL

Treatment for Head Neoplasms

Waitlist Available · 18+ · All Sexes · Durham, NC

This study is evaluating whether the financial burden of cancer care impacts quality of life and treatment-related decision-making.

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About the trial for Head Neoplasms

Eligible Conditions
Head and Neck Cancer · Head and Neck Neoplasms

Treatment Groups

This trial involves a single treatment. Treatment is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Main TreatmentA portion of participants receive this new treatment to see if it outperforms the control.
Control TreatmentAnother portion of participants receive the standard treatment to act as a baseline.

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 4 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Adult (18 years or older) patients
Diagnosed with HNC with treatment plan including definitive radiation therapy or chemotherapy/radiation therapy
Be able to read and write in English
Able to give informed consent and complete survey materials
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial

Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: 5 years
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 5 years
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: 5 years.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Treatment will improve 2 primary outcomes, 3 secondary outcomes, and 3 other outcomes in patients with Head Neoplasms. Measurement will happen over the course of 6 months post radiation therapy.

Financial toxicity, as measured by out of pocket (OOP) costs for a definitive course of treatment for HNC
6 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY
6 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY
Change in symptom burden, as measured by Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H&N) score
BASELINE, 3 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY, 6 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY
BASELINE, 3 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY, 6 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY
Financial toxicity, as measured by change in Comprehensive Score for financial Toxicity (COST)
BASELINE, 3 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY, 6 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY
Financial toxicity will be measured using the comprehensive score for financial toxicity (COST). The range of the COST score is 0-44.
BASELINE, 3 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY, 6 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY
Change in quality of life, as measured by FACT-H&N score
BASELINE, 3 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY, 6 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY
BASELINE, 3 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY, 6 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY
Perceived quality of care
3 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY, 6 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY
Patients will be asked to rate the quality of care as excellent, good, fair, poor, or very poor
3 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY, 6 MONTHS POST RADIATION THERAPY
Progression free survival
5 YEARS
5 YEARS
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Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

Can head neoplasms be cured?

Some rare cancers can be cured. However, they cannot be eradicated. However, patients can live a normal life with excellent quality of life. Early treatment options may also help to prevent secondary brain metastases. Although most patients can manage asymptomatic disorders, patients may benefit from some cancer treatments.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes head neoplasms?

The WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer, world health organization; WHO European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, world health organization, in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of head neoplasms?

Head and neck neoplasms represent a diagnostic challenge for most physicians. Patients often present with symptomatology that includes dysphagia, dyspnea and tachycardia. These patients may also have focal neurologic signs resulting from the mass effect produced by the neoplasm or from the edema that may result from the neoplasm, or they may have systemic manifestations (flu-like symptomatology) caused by the mass effect of the neoplasm or by the lymphatic obstruction caused by the neoplasm.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for head neoplasms?

The majority of head neoplasms are treated with external-beam radiation therapy. Surgery also has a role, but often is not the mainstay of most cases. Targeted therapies (e.g., monoclonal antibody) are being investigated as possible treatments of head neoplasms.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is head neoplasms?

Head neoplasms are tumors that develop in or under the skull. We can broadly class head neoplasms as benign or malignant tumors. Brain tumors are the most common category, and benign tumors of the brain can be classified in several anatomical ways.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get head neoplasms a year in the United States?

For [head and neck cancer](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/head-and-neck-cancer)s combined, there are about 2.2 million new cases of head and neck neoplasms and 526,000 deaths in the United States annually. As of 2008, head and neck cancer accounted for about 11,950 of these mortality cases in men and 3,770 in women. In 2007, mortality from head and neck cancer, including non-neoplastic benign conditions (cancer-related or otherwise), was 0.17 per 100,000 population (a rate 0.4 times the average of all causes and 2.5 times the all cancers mortality rate of 0.05 per 100,000 population).

Anonymous Patient Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for head neoplasms?

Many of the patients in our series had no evidence of brain metastases, suggesting that those in the trials are a select subgroup of patients who may represent a 'trial population' rather than patients who are representative of a general population. However, we can not rule out an opportunity for improving brain tumor treatments for patients outside our trial population. It will be essential for any large-scale trial to address the important unanswered question of identifying which brain tumor patients benefit from clinical trials.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How does treatment work?

For most patients, the clinical evidence suggests that treatment with chemoradiation is better than surgery alone for patients with rectal cancer. Radiation as part of treatment for rectal cancer is a type of adjuvant and is an effective treatment for rectal cancer. Adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer may decrease local recurrence after surgery. The clinical evidence suggests that pelvic lymph node dissection of rectal cancer remains an important adjuvant in selecting patients for chemoradiation. Most patients who have surgery and immediate chemoradiation are disease free at 10 years. Most patients who have surgery and adjuvant therapy do not remain disease free, and this difference is attributed to lymph node metastasis.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does treatment improve quality of life for those with head neoplasms?

Our investigation of QOL using the ENSQOL yielded mixed results. Overall, our results indicate that some questions of the ENSQOL are more sensitive to improvements in QOL when head NMs are treated, and that a few questions are less sensitive to treatment and more related to pretreatment QOL. However, overall, there are no questions on this measure that are specific to head NMs that change significantly on treatment.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does head neoplasms run in families?

Because the patients with head neoplasms and their relatives tended to have the same risk factor profiles, familial aggregation may not be attributable to an interaction of environmental factors with genes, but rather to a single genetic predisposition to certain neoplasms. It remains to be determined if genetic susceptibility is a risk factor for sporadic development of neoplasms or whether such susceptibility may contribute or not to the hereditary pattern of cancer development.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the survival rate for head neoplasms?

There is a lack of information on long-term follow-up data on patients with head neoplasms in Africa. The survival rate for head neoplasm depends on several factors including the site of origin, type of neoplastic cell, and surgical treatment. There is a need for further information to be collected and used in the treatment of head neoplasms on head and neck neoplasm in order to prevent disease progression and minimize disability in humans and animals.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is treatment?

In a recent study, findings will show that the most important element in making a decision about the type of treatment given depends on the type of cancer. The most common type of treatment for pancreatic cancer is surgery, while it is typically a combination of other treatments, such as gemcitabine and carboplatin, for colon cancer. Breast cancer is treated most often with breast-conserving therapy. Patients with colorectal cancer may see treatment such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy before deciding on their treatment. The type of treatment a patient might have depends on the type of cancer. In order to help decide what type of treatment to get, doctors will ask questions.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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