Waitlist Control after three months with High-Intensity Prompts for Alzheimer Disease

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
Alzheimer Disease+12 More
Waitlist Control after three months with High-Intensity Prompts - Behavioral
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Select

Study Summary

WeCareAdvisor Study for Caregivers of People Living With Dementia

See full description

Eligible Conditions

  • Alzheimer Disease
  • Semantic Dementia
  • Caregiver Stress Syndrome
  • Dementia
  • Dementia With Lewy Body Disease
  • Caregivers Burnout
  • Vascular Dementia (VaD)

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Alzheimer Disease

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether Waitlist Control after three months with High-Intensity Prompts will improve 6 primary outcomes and 12 secondary outcomes in patients with Alzheimer Disease. Measurement will happen over the course of 1 months.

1 Month
Short Term Change in Caregiver Wellbeing
Short Term Change in Caregiver- Negative Communications
Short-Term Change in Person Living with Dementia- Frequency and Severity of Behaviors
Short-term Change in Caregiver Distress with Behaviors
1 month
Short-Term Change in Caregiver Confidence Managing Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia
Short-term Change in Caregiver's Depressive Symptoms
1 months
Short-Term Change in Person with Dementia- Level of Functioning
Short-Term Change in Person with Dementia- Level of Physical Dependence
3 Month
Long Term Change in Caregiver- Negative Communications
3 Months
Long Term Change in Caregiver Wellbeing
Long-Term Change in Person Living with Dementia- Frequency and Severity of Behaviors
3 months
Long-Term Change in Caregiver Confidence Managing Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia
Long-Term Change in Person with Dementia- Level of Functioning
Long-Term Term Change in Person with Dementia- Level of Physical Dependence
Long-term Change in Caregiver Distress with Behaviors (3-Months)
Long-term Change in Caregiver's Depressive Symptoms
6 months
Change in Person with Dementia's Medications
Month 6
Utilization of tool use

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

1 of 3

Other trials for Alzheimer Disease

Trial Design

4 Treatment Groups

Immediate treatment group with High-Intensity Prompts
1 of 4
Immediate treatment group with Low-Intensity Prompts
1 of 4
Waitlist Control after three months with Low-Intensity Prompts
1 of 4
Waitlist Control after three months with high-Intensity prompts
1 of 4
Experimental Treatment

This trial requires 326 total participants across 4 different treatment groups

This trial involves 4 different treatments. Waitlist Control After Three Months With High-Intensity Prompts is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will be divided into 4 treatment groups. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Immediate treatment group with High-Intensity Prompts
Behavioral
Caregivers will use the WeCareAdvisor tool for six months and receive telephone and email prompts.
Immediate treatment group with Low-Intensity Prompts
Behavioral
Caregivers will use the WeCareAdvisor tool for six months and receive email prompts only.
Waitlist Control after three months with Low-Intensity Prompts
Behavioral
After three months, caregivers will receive WeCareAdvisor and email prompts only.
Waitlist Control after three months with high-Intensity prompts
Behavioral
After three months, caregivers will receive WeCareAdvisor and telephone and email prompts.

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 6 months
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly 6 months for reporting.

Closest Location

Drexel University - Philadelphia, PA

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 9 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
If the person with dementia is on an anti-dementia or psychotropic medication, they must be on a stable dose for at least 60 days prior to enrollment. show original
and on a stable does during the study The caregiver must be on a stable dose of their anti-depression or other psychotropic medication for at least 60 days prior to enrollment and during the study. show original
identify yourself as the person who is primarily responsible for the care of the person who has dementia. show original
Looking after a loved one for at least six months qualifies you as a caregiver. show original
approximately 40% of children about 1 in 4 children Almost half of children 44% of children Managing one or more behavioral symptoms in the past month is common among children show original
has access to a computer with internet connection; has basic computer skills; wants to improve her or his English language skills show original
I am I am a native English speaker. show original
Uses technology, such as a smartphone, tablet, laptop, or desktop computer, to access the Internet. show original
A person who lives in the United States or US territory does not need to have a visa to visit the British Virgin Islands for up to six months show original

Patient Q&A Section

How many people get burnout, student a year in the United States?

"Approximately one in 20 students have experienced burnout in the last 3 years. The proportion of students with burnout has not changed over the same period of time.burnout, depression, student." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are common treatments for burnout, student?

"The study concludes that, while specific treatments for burnout vary depending on the severity of the burnout symptomatology (especially with regard to hopelessness), the effects of the treatments are similar overall. However, to ensure the best treatment, patients (especially those suffering in combination with a chronic disease) should participate actively in managing their symptoms in a self-care fashion." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is burnout, student?

"Burnout, student, is defined by a subjective perception of being in a state of 'workaholism', which occurs when one is psychologically, socially, or physically overwhelmed by continuous or chronic work. The term 'burnout, student' is new for the literature and can have a range of potential associations. Findings from a recent study suggest that burnout is a potential outcome of graduate medical training programmes; however, no conclusive evidence has yet demonstrated a link between burnout, student, and graduate medical school training. Further research is needed into a broader range of constructs." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What causes burnout, student?

"Burnout is a disorder that is characterized by high levels of work-related stress. As a result, burnout can decrease the ability to work and result in absenteeism or diminished productivity." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What are the signs of burnout, student?

"Burnout has serious health problems, so early detection of burnout could be a way to prevent the problem from getting worse. As stated above, people who work with or interact with burnout sufferers or are going through a time of transition for work may be at risk for developing burnout symptoms themselves. The signs of burnout do not change if the patient thinks he or she has burnout or when it is a coincidence, for example when a colleague has burnout or a family member has a similar condition. The people affected by burnout also consider themselves to be normal in their sense of self-perception. A patient is considered normal if they feel that they have everything they want from their life." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Can burnout, student be cured?

"Burnout in student population seems to be at relatively high level, with a prevalence of depressive symptoms and high disability levels. It is important to detect student's burnout and treat it in order to reduce their burden. Preventing burnout seems to be a way to help student. However, since burnout is an occupational stress, it is advisable to find other ways to reduce burden." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Is immediate treatment group with high-intensity prompts safe for people?

"Providing a single high-intensity prompt to participants significantly reduced a composite outcome measure of patient safety hazards related to the prompt treatment phase of the study. Further research is necessary to understand whether implementing high-intensity alerts or other similar measures can reduce hazards among individuals at risk of adverse events in clinic management." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for burnout, student?

"Results from a recent paper highlights the value of engaging and supporting the potential study participant on all important facets of participation in health research. We propose that clinicians who are interested in clinical trials have three options: conduct or consider a research programme for themselves or enroll as 'experimental partners' in local studies; offer more comprehensive trials to patients with burnout or other clinical depression; or simply offer counselling referrals or help when required." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Have there been any new discoveries for treating burnout, student?

"The review provides a glimpse of the current state for treating burnout, student. Many studies for treating burnout are still being presented on the internet but more studies need to be done. The next steps for treating burnout would probably involve: a randomized controlled trial study, utilizing a prospective study design that includes patients and controls before and during the burnout treatment phases, a multi-disciplinary and multi-center treatment program that includes a group for which to evaluate outcomes, and an ongoing longitudinal follow-up study that includes all participants. Future directions to promote the wellness of individuals are encouraging, rewarding, and effective." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving immediate treatment group with high-intensity prompts?

"In addition to the ongoing investigation regarding the effectiveness of high-intensity prompts, it is possible for a clinician to evaluate the effectiveness of other low-pressure interventions for reducing attrition and increasing the number of CITCs and DITCs among anesthesiological trainees." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

How serious can burnout, student be?

"The consequences of burnout are serious insofar as they cause measurable repercussions on students' academic progress, career performance, attitudes, and emotional well-being. Further, they significantly alter student's ability to learn as they curtail their ability to perform in class, and they may even cause negative feelings during classwork as they negatively affect student's sense of belonging and motivation." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer

What is the average age someone gets burnout, student?

"About 1 in 10 students got burnout symptomatology, and 1 in 3 students got high levels of burnout. The students were aged between 15-25 with a mean age 21." - Anonymous Online Contributor

Unverified Answer
Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.
See if you qualify for this trial
Get access to this novel treatment for Alzheimer Disease by sharing your contact details with the study coordinator.