CLINICAL TRIAL

Cisplatin for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

Locally Advanced
Metastatic
Recruiting · 18+ · All Sexes · Skokie, IL

Study of Sacituzumab Govitecan-hziy Combinations in First-line Treatment of Participants With Advanced or Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Without Actionable Genomic Alterations

See full description

About the trial for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

Eligible Conditions
Non-small Cell Lung Cancer · Lung Neoplasms · Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 6 different treatments. Cisplatin is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will be divided into 6 treatment groups. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase 2 and have already been tested with other people.

Experimental Group 1
Cisplatin
DRUG
+
Sacituzumab Govitecan-hziy (SG)
DRUG
+
Pembrolizumab
DRUG
Experimental Group 2
Cisplatin
DRUG
+
Carboplatin
DRUG
+
Sacituzumab Govitecan-hziy (SG)
DRUG
+
Pembrolizumab
DRUG
Experimental Group 3
Sacituzumab Govitecan-hziy (SG)
DRUG
+
Pembrolizumab
DRUG
Show More

About The Treatment

Treatment
First Studied
Drug Approval Stage
How many patients have taken this drug
Cisplatin
2013
Completed Phase 3
~1930
Carboplatin
2014
Completed Phase 3
~5780
Sacituzumab Govitecan-hziy (SG)
2012
Completed Phase 2
~520
Pembrolizumab
2017
Completed Phase 3
~2950

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 6 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Individuals with pathologically documented evidence of Stage IV non-small cell lung Cancer (NSCLC) disease at the time of enrollment
Measurable disease by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as per RECIST Version 1.1 criteria by investigator No prior systemic treatment for metastatic NSCLC
Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status score of 0 or 1
Adequate hematologic counts
Adequate hepatic function
Key
View All
Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial
Similar Trials

Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: Up to 24 Months
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: Up to 24 Months
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: Up to 24 Months.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Cisplatin will improve 2 primary outcomes and 6 secondary outcomes in patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer. Measurement will happen over the course of First dose date up to 21 days.

Percentage of Participants Experiencing Dose-limiting Toxicities (DLTs) per Dose Level in the Safety Run-in Cohorts
FIRST DOSE DATE UP TO 21 DAYS
FIRST DOSE DATE UP TO 21 DAYS
Percentage of Participants Experiencing Clinical Laboratory Abnormalities
FIRST DOSE DATE UP TO 24 MONTHS PLUS 30 DAYS
FIRST DOSE DATE UP TO 24 MONTHS PLUS 30 DAYS
Percentage of Participants Experiencing Treatment-emergent Adverse Events (TEAEs)
FIRST DOSE DATE UP TO 24 MONTHS PLUS 30 DAYS
FIRST DOSE DATE UP TO 24 MONTHS PLUS 30 DAYS
Objective Response Rate as Assessed by Independent Review Committee (IRC) per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) Version 1.1
UP TO 22 MONTHS
UP TO 22 MONTHS
Overall Survival
UP TO 24 MONTHS
UP TO 24 MONTHS
Progression-free Survival as Assessed by IRC per RECIST Version 1.1
UP TO 24 MONTHS
UP TO 24 MONTHS
See More

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

Can non-small cell lung cancer be cured?

Chemotherapy is a well-known way to treat lung cancer but the quality of that treatment is still unsatisfactory. In the last decade, it has become apparent that some patients show spontaneous remissions, despite poor treatment by chemoradiation. It is not clear whether spontaneous remissions of NSCLC are in the interest of the patients and what the cost-benefit ratios of treating such patients are.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get non-small cell lung cancer a year in the United States?

About 60,800 people in the United States will be diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer in 2016. This number, however, is only a first crude estimate. A major limitation is that the number needs to be adjusted for current and past exposure to risk factors.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of non-small cell lung cancer?

Symptoms usually appear during the non-cancer stage, but can be of a significant nature when cancerous. The most common symptoms include cough and weight loss. Symptoms can persist for longer than 6 months. The most common tumours diagnosed are adenocarcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma, and small cell lung carcinoma, followed by non-melanoma skin tumours, squamous cell carcinoma and lung cancers of the small cell type. The mainstay of diagnosis is CT scan, followed by PET scan, which is particularly useful as a staging tool when used in combination with CT scanning.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes non-small cell lung cancer?

The cause of NSCLC is complex and often difficult to establish, but environmental and behavioral risk factors may be significant because cigarette smoking is the most important known cause of NSCLC. Additional research is needed to better understand how smoking affects NSCLC and how it may promote or hinder treatment of the lung cancer.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is non-small cell lung cancer?

Approximately 90% of [lung cancer](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/lung-cancer) cases are non-small cell lung cancer, and about 50% of lung cancer deaths are caused by this type of cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer is more common than small cell lung cancer. The median age when non-small cell lung cancer is diagnosed is 61 years; over 60% of patients are current or former heavy smokers. The risk of developing non-small cell lung cancer increases with time after smoking cessation. Non-small cell lung cancer is usually curable when it isn't made advanced by spread to distant sites or has already metastasized to regional sites of the lungs in the chest.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for non-small cell lung cancer?

While surgery may be the treatment of choice for many patients, chemotherapy may be needed for patients who fail surgery. For advanced disease, which has spread beyond the borders of the lung, and for some patients who are unwilling to undergo surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy should be given. For adjuvant chemotherapeutic agents, platinum-based drugs and taxanes appear to be effective. The extent of surgery depends on the location and size of the tumor and may include lobe- sparing surgery for some tumors. Radiation is usually combined with chemotherapy, but sometimes without. Radiation may be used for the head of the tumor. The use of a proton beam and stereotactic body radiation therapy are also being explored.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the survival rate for non-small cell lung cancer?

When patients experience symptoms from a [lung cancer](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/lung-cancer) that is not completely removed by treatment they may have a short survival duration. Lung cancer surgery provides the best long term survival when removal of the cancer is complete.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does cisplatin improve quality of life for those with non-small cell lung cancer?

Cisplatin alone is feasible for this sample, yet in the presence of a well-developed QL system, cisplatin does not impact QL but does appear to reduce the time to symptom remission.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is cisplatin?

Cisplatin is an antineoplastic chemotherapeutic drug used to treat many types of cancer. In multiple myeloma, cisplatin is commonly given to treat and prevent the disease by causing a rapid remission that often lasts a long time. Cisplatin also often cures metastatic breast cancer and some ovarian cancers or carcinoma of the brain. (http://www.discoveringcancer.org/chemo/cis-pla/chemin). Cisplatin is also found in cancer medicines called antineoplastic drugs, or anticancer drugs. Other treatments may also be needed after multiple myeloma treatment with cisplatin.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the common side effects of cisplatin?

Cisplatin seems to be a side-effect with low frequency and severity. The side effects are mostly of mild to moderate severity. These side effects are usually manageable and do not lead to treatment withdrawal.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the latest developments in cisplatin for therapeutic use?

Cisplatin continues to dominate the chemotherapeutic armamentarium in lung and head and neck tumours. Cisplatin-based regimens are not a cure but may improve long-term survival in NSCLC patients.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does non-small cell lung cancer run in families?

This is the first report of an aggregation of lung cancer cases and supports an argument for a genetic aetiology for lung cancer in the general familial population. Therefore, it is concluded that lung cancer is not an unusual disease within the general familial population.

Anonymous Patient Answer
See if you qualify for this trial
Get access to this novel treatment for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer by sharing your contact details with the study coordinator.