CLINICAL TRIAL

Personalized diet for Diet Intervention

Recruiting · 18 - 65 · All Sexes · Columbia, MO

This study is evaluating whether a personalized diet intervention can improve cardiometabolic outcomes in young black adults.

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About the trial for Diet Intervention

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Personalized Diet is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will be divided into 2 treatment groups. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Experimental Group 1
Personalized diet
OTHER
Experimental Group 2
Personalized diet
OTHER

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex between 18 and 65 years old. There are 8 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
predicts diet quality People who are willing to consume nuts, fruits and vegetables are more likely to have a healthier diet. show original
leads to maintaining the weight The study showed that people who followed a consistent diet and activity pattern for four weeks were more likely to maintain their weight. show original
Not much has changed in terms of my weight over the last 3 months show original
I am willing to comply with the study protocol. show original
The target market for our product is 18-35 year olds. show original
BMI: 25-45 kg/m2
People who identify themselves as being black, including those of hispanic ethnicity, and people who identify themselves as being non-hispanic white, all have a higher chance of developing obesity than those who identify themselves as being asian. show original
I have not smoked cigarettes in more than a year. show original
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial
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Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: Every 4 weeks over the 8 week intervention
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: Every 4 weeks over the 8 week intervention
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: Every 4 weeks over the 8 week intervention.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Personalized diet will improve 10 primary outcomes, 8 secondary outcomes, and 4 other outcomes in patients with Diet Intervention. Measurement will happen over the course of Baseline and at the end of the 8-week intervention.

Transcriptomics profiles
BASELINE AND AT THE END OF THE 8-WEEK INTERVENTION
Untargeted transcriptomics
BASELINE AND AT THE END OF THE 8-WEEK INTERVENTION
Food environment perceptions
BASELINE AND AT THE END OF THE 8-WEEK INTERVENTION
Subjective and objective questionnaires
BASELINE AND AT THE END OF THE 8-WEEK INTERVENTION
Arterial stiffness
BASELINE AND AT THE END OF THE 8-WEEK INTERVENTION
Pulse wave analysis
BASELINE AND AT THE END OF THE 8-WEEK INTERVENTION
Attention score
CHANGE OVER 8 WEEKS
d2 test of attention
CHANGE OVER 8 WEEKS
Change in inflammatory markers
CHANGE OVER 8 WEEKS
MCP-1,IL6, IL10, TNFa, hs-CRP, and fibrinogen
CHANGE OVER 8 WEEKS
Change in insulinemic biomarker concentrations
CHANGE OVER 8 WEEKS
Fasting insulin and C-peptide concentrations
CHANGE OVER 8 WEEKS
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Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
J. D.
Prof. Jaapna Dhillon, Assistant Professor, Nutrition & Exercise Phys-MED
University of Missouri-Columbia

Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What is diet intervention?

Most of the publications reported only short-term results and did not report on changes to dietary patterns in the long-term. Better research is needed to find out how we can help our patients cope better with schizophrenia.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get diet intervention a year in the United States?

Around 1.5 million Americans are estimated to receive a dietary prevention intervention from a healthcare professional annually. Although the prevalence of obesity in the US has increased significantly over the last two decades, the frequency of receipt of dietary intervention has remained fairly stable. Improving the rate of utilization in the US will require the development of effective, sustained, and repeated strategies to tackle obesity.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for diet intervention?

Diet and dietary supplementation are often used in the treatment of a variety of conditions and illnesses. Dietary intervention may be prescribed to improve a person's ability to deal with the stressful effects of disease, or in order to help to optimize overall health and longevity.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of diet intervention?

Regular follow-ups are recommended to all patients who have undergone diet intervention, in order to identify and treat any adverse effects. These patients can take preventive dietary advice when needed, in a manner similar to that of chronic disease prevention.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can diet intervention be cured?

Nutrition education and adherence to a hypo-carbohydrate regimen can reduce the likelihood of developing and maintaining a clinical diagnosis of diabetes as long as a medication for the disorder is maintained.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes diet intervention?

Diet appears to have an important role in altering plasma levels of cholesterol, which in turn can have a significant effect on the risk of cardiovascular disease by affecting the risk for thrombosis or embolism. This may also explain the observation that certain kinds of dietary modification, such as a vegetarian or low cholesterol diet, are associated with reduced risk of dementia. In most cases, however, dietary modification has no effect on the risk of developing cardiovascular disease; in some cases, however, changing to a lower-fat or low-fat diet is associated with reduced risk. Results from a recent paper suggest that dietary modification is at best only a minor risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the common side effects of personalized diet?

Recent findings may help dietitians to better estimate the most common side effects when a prescription diet is developed. Recent findings may also help dietitians to prioritize some side effects that require further investigation and to find ways to reduce the severity of these side effects.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving personalized diet?

Although the clinical trial data are relatively short and only three trials have been performed, the potential for personalized health interventions is substantial. Clinical studies are needed to develop more sensitive and objective assessment methods and to evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the personalized diet programs.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What does personalized diet usually treat?

Most patients with [type 2 diabetes](https://www.withpower.com/clinical-trials/type-2-diabetes), but few patients with type 1 diabetes, received individual counseling of diet for individuals with type 2 diabetes. Although counseling for type 2 diabetic patients improved nutritional self-management of patients and their diabetes parameters, the provision of personalized meal plans for type 1 diabetic patients is not yet fully tested.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the latest research for diet intervention?

The recent studies suggest that there is not much evidence for the effectiveness of diet intervention in lupus, except for one study (COSMOS) that found that a Mediterranean diet and low-salt diet can reduce the risk of flare-ups in people with lupus.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does personalized diet improve quality of life for those with diet intervention?

In-person communication is efficacious in improving outcomes regarding diet intervention in obese patients with overweight or a BMI of 30 kg/m(2) or over; however, changes in diet, weight, and quality of life, which are the primary outcomes, were not observed.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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