oral minoxidil for Alopecia Areata

Phase-Based Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
Alopecia Areata+2 More
oral minoxidil - Drug
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
Eligible conditions
Alopecia Areata

Study Summary

This study is evaluating whether minoxidil may help treat chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

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Eligible Conditions

  • Alopecia Areata
  • Alopecia
  • Permanent Chemotherapy-induced Alopecia

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Estimate

1 of 3

Study Objectives

This trial is evaluating whether oral minoxidil will improve 2 primary outcomes and 1 secondary outcome in patients with Alopecia Areata. Measurement will happen over the course of 48 weeks.

48 weeks
Change in degree of hair regrowth using the Dean Scale
Change in degree of hair regrowth using the IPAQ scale
Change in quality of life

Trial Safety

Safety Estimate

1 of 3

Trial Design

2 Treatment Groups

Control
Minoxidil Treatment

This trial requires 25 total participants across 2 different treatment groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Oral Minoxidil is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are in Phase < 1 and are in the first stage of evaluation with people.

Minoxidil Treatment
Drug
Low dose oral minoxidil
ControlNo treatment in the control group

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 48 weeks
This trial has the following approximate timeline: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and roughly 48 weeks for reporting.

Who is running the study

Principal Investigator
J. N. C.
Jennifer Nam Choi, MD
Northwestern University

Closest Location

Northwestern University - Chicago, IL

Eligibility Criteria

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 7 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
Patients with a clinical diagnosis of permanent chemotherapy-induced alopecia who completed chemotherapy ≥ 6 months from the date of registration.
Patients must be age ≥ 18 years.
Females of child-bearing potential (FOCBP) and males must agree to use adequate contraception (e.g., hormonal contraceptives such as birth control pills, patch, intrauterine device; barrier contraception such as male/female condoms, diaphragm; male partner with vasectomy; abstinence) prior to study entry, for the duration of study participation, and for 30 days following completion of therapy.
Should a female patient become pregnant or suspect she is pregnant while participating in this study, she should inform her treating physician immediately.
NOTE: A FOCBP is any woman (regardless of sexual orientation, having undergone a tubal ligation, or remaining celibate by choice) who meets the following criteria: Has not undergone a hysterectomy or bilateral oophorectomy Has had menses at any time in the preceding 12 consecutive months (and therefore has not been naturally postmenopausal for > 12 months)
FOCBP must have a negative urine or serum pregnancy test within 7 days prior to registration on study.
Patients must have the ability to understand and the willingness to sign a written informed consent prior to registration in the study.

Patient Q&A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

Can alopecia areata be cured?

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Topical and systemic steroidic treatments are effective in controlling disease severity in patients with AAG. Topical and systemic steroid treatments are more effective in patients whose disease has been stable for 4 to 16 months. Maintenance therapy with steroid is necessary during relapse episodes.

Unverified Answer

What causes alopecia areata?

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Various drugs, including some antimycotics, hormonal medicines, and hormonal contraceptives, and toxins such as some dyes have been linked to developing AA. More research is needed to better understand AA.

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What is alopecia areata?

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The cause of AA is unknown, but a strong hereditary tendency to AA is implicated. The term AA can be used to describe all types of AA, especially those with scars and/or scalp hair involvement.

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What are the signs of alopecia areata?

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Patients with a history of diffuse or localized alopecia areata can present with hair loss which tends to recur at the same hair follicle site, and in many cases, is associated with other signs and symptoms such as rash, arthritis, swollen lymph nodes and fever.\n

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How many people get alopecia areata a year in the United States?

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Alopecia areata is diagnosed in up to 1-4% of females or 1-3% of males in the population. The prevalence of alopecia areata is not significantly higher among African Americans or Caucasian males. The overall prevalence of alopecia areata is higher in females than the prevalence of the disease in males, irrespective of ethnicity, age, or geographic area. The prevalence varies by patient age.

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What are common treatments for alopecia areata?

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AL is associated with a number of dermatologists, but the specific management varies considerably. Treatment is targeted towards hair loss in most cases. Most hair loss in AL is progressive, but follicle growth is possible. Treatment can be difficult and is focused on maintaining symptom relief. Oral and topical medications are used to treat symptoms.

Unverified Answer

Is oral minoxidil safe for people?

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Based on the adverse effects reported in studies that used topical minoxidil, oral minoxidil may be inappropriate for the treatment of scalp hair loss. Patients with a history of skin and genital warts should also seek medical advice before taking oral minoxidil.

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What is the latest research for alopecia areata?

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The current evidence seems to support that alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease that probably affects the hair follicles rather than the skin. We suggest that IgE testing and skin prick tests with extracts from hair follicle cells are both useful in the diagnosis of alopecia areata. We also suggest the use of an autologous dermal extract (ALI) as a potential therapeutic option.

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What are the latest developments in oral minoxidil for therapeutic use?

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Oral minoxidil is effective in this group of patients and appears to be well tolerated. There is some evidence of improved hair regrowth and a reduction in relapse rates in some patients. It can be recommended as a first-line option for these patients and more work is required to define the precise role of minoxidil as a second-line treatment in patients with significant relapse of alopecia.

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Have there been any new discoveries for treating alopecia areata?

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Patients suffering from this disease may benefit from treatments that may prevent other conditions that can be associated with the disease, such as, psychological problems and skin lesions (e.g., atopic dermatitis). To the best of our knowledge, no specific pharmacological treatment has been developed for this diseases.

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How serious can alopecia areata be?

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Patients had a wide range of scalp hair loss severity from no hair loss to complete hair loss. Patients that experienced less severe (moderate and mild) hair loss were not as likely to have symptoms consistent with significant depression, suicidal tendencies, or sexual dysfunction, and were less likely to have been treated for a depression. Serious psychiatric disorders should be sought, especially in patients with severe (very severe and complete) hair loss. Hair loss can be a major component of alopecia areata in some patients, such as the loss of most eyebrows and beard hairs.

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Does alopecia areata run in families?

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In a large fraction of the families with AA the genetic basis for the disease remains elusive. Further research will be important to identify genes that are responsible for AA with genetic links to AA. In fact several candidate genes have been associated with AA and may act in conjunction with environmental factors contributing to the phenotype.

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