Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
25 Nexavar Clinical Trials Near Me
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Most Recent Nexavar Clinical Trials

What Are Nexavar Clinical Trials?

Nexavar comes as a tablet and is an anti-cancer agent that helps block tumor angiogenesis and cell proliferation. It is a targeted therapy in the kinase inhibitors class of medications.

The FDA approved Nexavar for treating kidney cancer in 2005 and liver cancer in 2007. In 2014, it gained FDA approval for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, and advanced renal cell carcinoma. Nexavar kills and reduces the spread of cancer in your body by slowing down the growth of cancer cells.

Why is Nexavar Studied in Clinical Trials?

The main reason Nexavar is being studied in several clinical trials is its effect on liver and kidney cancer. Several tests show Nexavar effectively controls the spread of specific cancer and kidney cancers. Phase III trials are among the latest trials of this element and aim to investigate its effectiveness in kidney cancer compared to other alternatives.

How Does Nexavar Work?

Nexavar is an FDA-approved treatment for the following cancer types;

  • Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a popular liver cancer type
  • Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), a common type of thyroid cancer
  • Advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), a popular type of kidney cancer

These cells are notorious for abnormal growth. They begin as small cells and grow out of control, eventually forming tumors.

The primary objective of Nexavar in your system is to stop tumor growth and aid in killing cancer cells. It functions as a Kinase inhibitor and controls the growth of your body cells. Kinase enzymes provide blood flow to the tumor, which is bad since it encourages tumor growth.

Limiting blood supply is the first step to killing the cancer-caused tumors in your body. Nexavar prevents cancer growth by blocking kinase enzymes. It also kills these cancer cells since it decreases the blood supply to the tumor.

How Long Does Nexavar Take to Work?

Immediately after your first dose of Nexavar, the medication will start working to minimize cancer’s effect on your body. It would be wise to have a prescription from a licensed practitioner before consuming the drug.

What Are the Breakthrough Clinical Trials Involving Nexavar?

Some of the notable clinical studies involving Nexavar include;

2006; Nexavar for Advanced Renal Cell Treatment- This study described Nexavar as a practical candidate for RCC treatment. The phase 3 trial included 902 patients diagnosed with advanced progressive RCC. They were randomized to two doses of 400 mg sorafenib and supportive care.

2015; Nexavar for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treatment- This study showed that a significant percentage of HCC patients could potentially benefit from Sorafenib therapy. These patients usually have a defined tumor that surgeons cannot resect, making them viable candidates for Nexavar, which contains Sorafenib.

2015; Nexavar for Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma Treatment- Nexavar also helps treat radioactive iodine- refractory differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). The study showed that two doses of 400 mg of Sorafenib significantly prolonged median progression-free survival.

Who Are the Key Opinion Leaders on Nexavar Clinical Trials

Dr. Robert C Kane

Dr. Robert C. Kane is a renowned hematologist in Florida. He has over 30 research works in cancer clinical trials, some of which include Nexavar as a treatment alternative.

Dr. Ann T. Farrel

Dr. Ann T. Farrel is also a key figure in Nexavar clinical trials. She is a hematologist in Silver Spring, Maryland, with over 20 years of experience. Her research on advanced renal cell carcinoma makes her contribution incredibly significant.

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 15th, 2021

Last Reviewed: October 8th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.

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