Lymphedema Clinical Trials 2023

Browse 36 Lymphedema Medical Studies Across 145 Cities

4 Phase 3 Trial · 223 Lymphedema Clinics

Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
10 Lymphedema Clinical Trials Near Me
Top Hospitals for Lymphedema Clinical Trials
Image of M D Anderson Cancer Center in Texas.
M D Anderson Cancer Center
Houston
3Active Trials
4All Time Trials for Lymphedema
2012First Lymphedema Trial
Image of Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Tennessee.
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville
2Active Trials
5All Time Trials for Lymphedema
2015First Lymphedema Trial
Image of Cross Cancer Institute in Alberta.
Cross Cancer Institute
Edmonton
2Active Trials
5All Time Trials for Lymphedema
2003First Lymphedema Trial
Image of Olive View-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center in California.
Olive View-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center
Sylmar
2Active Trials
2All Time Trials for Lymphedema
2012First Lymphedema Trial
Image of Stanford University in California.
Stanford University
Stanford
2Active Trials
6All Time Trials for Lymphedema
2009First Lymphedema Trial
Top Cities for Lymphedema Clinical Trials
Image of Columbus in Ohio.
Columbus
8Active Trials
Mount Carmel East HospitalTop Active Site
Image of Houston in Texas.
Houston
6Active Trials
M D Anderson Cancer CenterTop Active Site
Lymphedema Clinical Trials by Phase of TrialLymphedema Clinical Trials by Age GroupMost Recent Lymphedema Clinical TrialsTop Treatments for Lymphedema Clinical Trials
Treatment Name
Active Lymphedema Clinical Trials
All Time Trials for Lymphedema
First Recorded Lymphedema Trial
Quality-of-Life Assessment
2
6
2007
Clinic-Based Lymphedema Therapy
1
1
2022
Cohort I (patients receiving annual lymphedema screening)
1
1
2017
Advanced Pneumatic Compression Device (APCD)
1
1
2021
Ultrasound Procedure
1
1
2020

What Are Lymphedema Clinical Trials?

Lymphedema is the swelling of tissue as a result of an accumulation of fluid rich in protein. This fluid is typically drained from the lymphatic system of the body. Lymphedema usually affects the legs or arms but may also occur in the genitals, neck, abdomen, and chest wall.

Since lymph nodes are an essential component of the lymphatic system, Lymphedema could also occur due to those cancer treatments that damage or remove the lymph nodes. Any issue that blocks the lymph fluid drainage could lead to Lymphedema.

Severe cases can significantly impact the movement capability of the affected limb, result in skin breakdown and changes, and increase the sepsis and skin infection risk.

Why Is Lymphedema Being Studied Through Clinical Trials?

Primary Lymphedema is a rare disease and can affect one in 100,000 people, but secondary Lymphedema is more common, affecting 1 in 1,000 individuals. One in every five breast cancer surviving women can develop Lymphedema.

In neck and head cancer, soft and lymphatic complications may develop during the initial 18 months of treatment, with over 90% of patients going through a particular type of combined, external, or internal Lymphedema. More than half of these patients might develop fibrosis.

What Are The Types of Treatments Available For Lymphedema?

There isn’t any cure for Lymphedema, which is the reason clinical trials are integral. However, treatments are available to help patients manage the swelling and prevent it from worsening. These treatments include:

  • Surgery is required for severe Lymphedema
  • Cancer treatment in case the cancerous tumor has caused Lymphedema
  • Weight loss is suggested for patients with Lymphedema linked to breast cancer
  • A pneumatic pump inflates the sleeve that is placed on a swollen leg or arm to drain the fluid
  • Exercising also helps in reducing swelling and draining the lymph fluid
  • Massage therapy, particularly manual lymph drainage, helps in draining the lymph fluid from the swollen areas of the body
  • Compression stocking or sleeve aids with swollen leg or arm

What Are Some Recent Breakthrough Clinical Trials For Lymphedema?

2020: The advancement in lymphatic super-microsurgery has shown promising results. The researchers tracked the surgical outcomes in the lymphaticovenular anastomosis (LVA) cases, tracking indocyanine green (ICG) lymphography, limb volume measurement, and clinical examinations. The results indicated that all patients had no signs of limb edema, and there was evidence of improvement. This study suggested that full reversal of Lymphedema is possible with super-microsurgery intervention.

2018: A study uncovered one of the primary molecular mechanism triggers for Lymphedema and found a drug that could prevent this process. The researchers found that the lymph fluid buildup was the inflammatory reaction within the skin tissue. This was caused by leukotriene B4, or LTB4, a natural inflammatory-causing substance. The scientists targeted the LTB4 using pharmacological agents in mice and induced the reversal and repair of the disease.

Who Are Some Of The Key Opinion Leaders / Researchers / Institutions Conducting Lymphedema Clinical Trials Research?

Lymphatic Education & Research Network: It is a non-profit institution created to fight Lymphedema and other lymphatic diseases through advocacy, research, and education.

Center for Lymphatic and Venous Disorders: This Stanford institution diligently works to research and find innovative therapeutic and diagnostic treatments for Lymphedema and other lymphatic diseases by conducting clinical trials, funding research, and spreading awareness.

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 30th, 2021

Last Reviewed: August 31st, 2023

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