Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
2 Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials Near Me
Top Hospitals for Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials
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Mayo Clinic Rochester
Rochester
1Active Trials
1All Time Trials for Diabetes Insipidus
2022First Diabetes Insipidus Trial
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Mayo Clinic
Jacksonville
1Active Trials
1All Time Trials for Diabetes Insipidus
2022First Diabetes Insipidus Trial
Top Cities for Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials
Image of Rochester in Minnesota.
Rochester
1Active Trials
Mayo Clinic RochesterTop Active Site
Image of Jacksonville in Florida.
Jacksonville
1Active Trials
Mayo ClinicTop Active Site
Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials by Phase of Trial
Phase 1 Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials
1Active Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials
1Number of Unique Treatments
1Number of Active Locations
Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials by Age Group
18+ Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials
1Active Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials
Most Recent Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials
Clinical Trial
Began Recruiting Date
Phase
Top Treatments for Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials
Treatment Name
Active Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials
All Time Trials for Diabetes Insipidus
First Recorded Diabetes Insipidus Trial
PB
1
1
2022
Oxytocin nasal spray
1
1
2022

What Are Diabetes Insipidus Clinical Trials?

Diabetes Insipidus (DI) is a rare condition that causes excessive urination. Di occurs when the kidney is unable to conserve water through reabsorption. While a healthy adult typically urinates around 2.8 liters a day, a patient suffering from diabetes insipidus would excrete almost 19 liters.

Diabetes insipidus is caused due to a problem with the antidiuretic hormone (ADH), also called vasopressin, which controls the amount of water retained by the kidney. Diabetes insipidus is divided into four types:

  1. Central DI: when the body is not releasing enough ADH through the pituitary gland, even though the hypothalamus produces enough.
  2. Nephrogenic DI: when the pituitary releases ADH, but the kidneys do not respond to it appropriately.
  3. Dipsogenic DI: when there is a problem with the hypothalamus unrelated to the production of ADH.
  4. Gestational DI: when the placenta in pregnant women makes too much enzyme that breaks down ADH.

Diabetes Insipidus clinical trials involve research studies on the etiology and possible risk factors of all four types of the condition. Moreover, clinical trials are being conducted to develop improved diagnostic measures to target the underlying cause, as treatment varies depending on the type of diabetes insipidus.

Why is Diabetes Insipidus Being Studied through Clinical Trials?

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, diabetes insipidus is a sporadic disease that affects one in 25,000 people worldwide. While rare, the condition can lead to excessive water loss and dehydration, especially in children. Dehydration leads to dry mouth, fatigue, dizziness, and dry skin. Moreover, DI causes an electrolyte imbalance in the boy resulting in nausea, weakness, muscle cramps, and more.

Current treatment methods include lifestyle changes or medication such as desmopressin. However, desmopressin can have severe side effects, including headaches, nosebleeds, and abdominal pain. Moreover, the proper treatment varies depending on the type of diabetes insipidus, but current diagnostic methods cannot accurately judge the cause.

Therefore, diabetes insipidus clinical trials are being conducted to develop improved treatment and diagnostic methods for reduced side effects and better identify the condition to prevent progression and complications.

What Are The Types of Treatment Available For Diabetes Insipidus?

Current treatment methods depend on the type of diabetes insipidus.

  • Central DI: is treated using desmopressin, a synthetic form of ADH.
  • Nephrogenic DI: is treated using diuretics such as amiloride and painkillers such as aspirin. Some treatments also involve nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as indomethacin.
  • Dispogenic DI: There is currently no treatment.
  • Gestational DI: does not require treatment as it usually goes away once the pregnancy has been completed.

What Are Some Recent Breakthrough Clinical Trials for Diabetes Insipidus?

Current diabetes insipidus clinical trials are centered around drug therapy and improved diagnostic methods to treat the disease early on to avoid complications. Some of the recent breakthrough clinical trials for diabetes insipidus include:

2022: a phase 2 clinical study (NCT05190744) by Mayo Clinic to study the efficacy and safety of medication B in treated diabetes insipidus as an inherited condition or one acquired from lithium treatment.

2022: a phase 2 clinical trial (NCT04789148) by Elizabeth Austen Lawson to study the effects of oxytocin that is administered nasally (4 IU and 24 IU)in treating central diabetes insipidus

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 31st, 2021

Last Reviewed: October 16th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.