Bright White Light Therapy for Urinary Bladder

Phase-Based Progress Estimates
1
Effectiveness
1
Safety
City of Hope Medical Center, Duarte, CA
Urinary Bladder+9 More
Bright White Light Therapy - Device
Eligibility
18+
All Sexes
What conditions do you have?
Select

Study Summary

This clinical trial evaluates light therapy and occupational therapy in improving cancer related fatigue (CRF) patients with genitourinary cancers. Light therapy is a non-pharmacological and evidence-based intervention for managing fatigue in cancer patients. The use of light therapy can provide a low burden, inexpensive, and easy to disseminate intervention approach that can potentially have a larger impact on CRF. In addition, occupational therapy is a standard, but often underutilized, component of the multi-disciplinary approach to cancer care. Using the combination of light therapy and occupational therapy may be effective in CRF management.

Eligible Conditions

  • Urinary Bladder
  • Renal Carcinoma
  • Genitourinary System Neoplasm
  • Prostate Cancer

Treatment Effectiveness

Effectiveness Progress

1 of 3

Study Objectives

1 Primary · 3 Secondary · Reporting Duration: 6 weeks after baseline

3 months after baseline
Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - (FACIT)
Longitudinal change in FACIT-Fatigue scores
6 weeks after baseline
Self-reported occupational performance - session 6
Baseline
Self-reported occupational performance - Baseline

Trial Safety

Safety Progress

1 of 3

Trial Design

4 Treatment Groups

Arm IV (Control)
1 of 4
Arm II (OT)
1 of 4
Arm I (BWL)
1 of 4
Arm III (OT, BWL)
1 of 4
Active Control
Experimental Treatment

224 Total Participants · 4 Treatment Groups

Primary Treatment: Bright White Light Therapy · No Placebo Group · N/A

Arm II (OT)Experimental Group · 2 Interventions: Questionnaire Administration, Occupational Therapy · Intervention Types: Other, Behavioral
Arm I (BWL)Experimental Group · 2 Interventions: Questionnaire Administration, Bright White Light Therapy · Intervention Types: Other, Device
Arm III (OT, BWL)Experimental Group · 3 Interventions: Questionnaire Administration, Bright White Light Therapy, Occupational Therapy · Intervention Types: Other, Device, Behavioral
Arm IV (Control)ActiveComparator Group · 2 Interventions: Questionnaire Administration, Best Practice · Intervention Types: Other, Other
Treatment
First Studied
Drug Approval Stage
How many patients have taken this drug
Occupational Therapy
2011
Completed Phase 3
~1230

Trial Logistics

Trial Timeline

Approximate Timeline
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: 6 weeks after baseline
Closest Location: City of Hope Medical Center · Duarte, CA
Photo of Duarte 1Photo of Duarte 2Photo of Duarte 3
2002First Recorded Clinical Trial
0 TrialsResearching Urinary Bladder
142 CompletedClinical Trials

Who is running the clinical trial?

City of Hope Medical CenterLead Sponsor
501 Previous Clinical Trials
2,246,171 Total Patients Enrolled
National Cancer Institute (NCI)NIH
12,930 Previous Clinical Trials
41,294,236 Total Patients Enrolled
William DalePrincipal InvestigatorCity of Hope Medical Center
1 Previous Clinical Trials
33 Total Patients Enrolled

Eligibility Criteria

Age 18+ · All Participants · 7 Total Inclusion Criteria

Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
You are aged 18 years or over.
You have a clinician-assessed prognosis of greater than or equal to six months.
You have a GU cancer and you have grade 1 or 2 fatigue based on physician assessment at the time of study entry.
You have received a pre-screen FACIT-Fatigue score of less than or equal to 30.
You are receiving systemic therapy or radiotherapy.

About The Reviewer

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 9th, 2021

Last Reviewed: August 12th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.