CLINICAL TRIAL

Metrics-driven quality improvement (MDQI) for Opioid Abuse

Recruiting · 18+ · All Sexes · Jamaica, NY

This study is evaluating whether a set of activities can help people with opioid use disorders.

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About the trial for Opioid Abuse

Eligible Conditions
Opioid-Related Disorders · Disease · Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) · Substance-Related Disorders · Substance Use Disorders (SUD)

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Metrics-driven Quality Improvement (MDQI) is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Main TreatmentA portion of participants receive this new treatment to see if it outperforms the control.
Metrics-driven quality improvement (MDQI)
BEHAVIORAL
Control TreatmentAnother portion of participants receive the standard treatment to act as a baseline.

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex aged 18 and older. There are 3 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
The study will be open to all staff and patients from participating clinics. show original
The study will focus on people aged 64 and over who are enrolled in Medicaid, as well as those with disabilities who have their care covered by Medicare. show original
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial
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Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: Assessed from commencement of the trial in Year 1 of the study to the conclusion of the trial in Year 4 of the study.
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: Assessed from commencement of the trial in Year 1 of the study to the conclusion of the trial in Year 4 of the study..
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Metrics-driven quality improvement (MDQI) will improve 7 primary outcomes and 4 secondary outcomes in patients with Opioid Abuse. Measurement will happen over the course of Assessed from commencement of the intervention at each clinic to 1 year post-intervention.

Change in clinic-rates of clients with co-existing psychiatric disorder as indicated in state administrative admission data
ASSESSED FROM COMMENCEMENT OF THE INTERVENTION AT EACH CLINIC TO 1 YEAR POST-INTERVENTION
Change in clinic-level rates of clients with Severe OUD
ASSESSED FROM COMMENCEMENT OF THE INTERVENTION AT EACH CLINIC TO 1 YEAR POST-INTERVENTION
As indicated by daily use and/or injection drug use as indicated in state administrative admission data
Cost of treatment
ASSESSED FROM COMMENCEMENT OF THE INTERVENTION AT EACH CLINIC TO 1 YEAR POST-INTERVENTION
Cost of the intervention to the clinic
Change in clinic level-rates of clients identified as homeless
ASSESSED FROM COMMENCEMENT OF THE INTERVENTION AT EACH CLINIC TO 1 YEAR POST-INTERVENTION
As indicated in state administrative admission data
Change in Health Status
ASSESSED FROM THE START OF EACH CLINIC IN THE INTERVENTION TO 1 YEAR POST-INTERVENTION
Change in health status is measured by the first item of the SF-12 Health Survey: "In general, would you say your health is: 1 - excellent, 2 - very good, 3 - good, 4 - fair, 5 - poor". Scores range from 1-5, with a higher score indicating worse health.
Change in Incidence of Overdoses
ASSESSED FROM COMMENCEMENT OF THE TRIAL IN YEAR 1 OF THE STUDY TO THE CONCLUSION OF THE TRIAL IN YEAR 4 OF THE STUDY.
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Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What is the latest research for opioid abuse?

This article provides recent results for current opioid addiction research. We hope to encourage other research groups to consider the effects of the current research results on our population.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the average age someone gets opioid abuse?

It appears that people in Ontario are being prescribed opioids well before the official guidelines are being implemented, which may be the cause for these alarming numbers of opioid abuse.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been other clinical trials involving metrics-driven quality improvement (mdqi)?

The existing MDS methodology has a poor capacity for measuring and responding to quality improvement initiatives when standardized interventions are delivered to patients with opioid use disorder.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is opioid abuse?

Opioid use is prevalent in opioid-using communities. The burden of heroin use and dependence is significant, whereas methadone prescribing is far lower than is perceived. The impact of prescribing methadone for heroin abusers should be considered, especially in communities with large homeless populations.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for opioid abuse?

Medications for treating opioid abuse are limited and vary widely depending upon the patient, the type of abuse (e.g., abuse of prescription opioids), the level of severity of abuse, and the patient's willingness to seek help. There are many medications and treatment programs but no single medication or program is effective or uncontroversial. Drug use is the most controversial topic concerning opioid abuse, and no medication is unambiguously beneficial or harmful for the development of addiction. Thus the most common and effective treatment that is currently available is treatment of addiction to opioids by any method that is consistent with and supportive of the addict's personal care, motivation, and judgment.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the signs of opioid abuse?

Signs of opioid abuse include euphoria and sedation. In addition, the signs of opioid withdrawal include drowsiness, dizziness, dry mouth, and constipation. Abstinence may take up to 48 hours to complete. The period after complete abstinence may be associated with a period of craving which can culminate in a relapse.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes opioid abuse?

The number one cause of opioid abuse is addiction and tolerance. This is most often attributed to a psychological compulsion caused by the abuse. Addiction, tolerance and withdrawal are the three major causes that contribute to over-consumption of opioids and heroin, and many of the problems faced by users.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get opioid abuse a year in the United States?

Nearly one-third of American adults reported a history of using opioid medications at any time in the previous 12 months. Although opioid abuse can cause or contribute to serious diseases, this may be underreported in clinical care and public health surveillance because of a lack of information on opioids in patient records or by health care professionals. Future studies of clinical records and public health surveillance efforts must include information on opioids to better identify populations at greatest risk for opioid abuse.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can opioid abuse be cured?

The term 'cure' should be reserved for cases with long-term symptomatic recovery. Those who want to stay out of jail, do not use illicit drugs to the extent of addiction, and do not consume them, cannot be cured of their dependence by an oral (or equivalent) opioid-addiction-rehabilitation regimen. The use of 'cure' can distort the facts and encourage people to seek treatment too soon.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Have there been any new discoveries for treating opioid abuse?

Until the last decade, the opioid misuse epidemic led to significant suffering and public health challenges. Over the last 10 years, a number of new treatments were introduced, but their use was still hampered by low adherence and the need for a combination of methods to treat opioid dependence. The development of a single treatment for opioid dependence will remain an unmet demand.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Has metrics-driven quality improvement (mdqi) proven to be more effective than a placebo?

The data suggest that a quality improvement curriculum for post-anesthesiologist intensive care units may be superior to the traditional model, that is, a course designed to improve the practice of medicine over the long term.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Does metrics-driven quality improvement (mdqi) improve quality of life for those with opioid abuse?

The use of standardized opioid metrics and audit was associated with improvements in opioid abuse, opioid utilization, adherence, and QOL. The study provides further rationale for expanding this approach to other types of medicine within the context of a quality improvement program.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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