CLINICAL TRIAL

Treatment for Hip Arthroscopy

Refractory
EnrollingByInvitation · 18 - 65 · All Sexes · Boulder, CO

This study is evaluating whether a new cannula and a new tool set can be used to improve hip arthroscopy procedures.

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About the trial for Hip Arthroscopy

Treatment Groups

This trial involves 2 different treatments. Treatment is the primary treatment being studied. Participants will all receive the same treatment. There is no placebo group. The treatments being tested are not being studied for commercial purposes.

Control Group 1
Modified bone graft delivery tool set
DEVICE
+
Modified hip capsule side fixed slotted cannula
DEVICE
Control Group 2
Modified hip capsule side fixed slotted cannula
DEVICE

Eligibility

This trial is for patients born any sex between 18 and 65 years old. There are 5 eligibility criteria to participate in this trial as listed below.

Inclusion & Exclusion Checklist
Mark “yes” if the following statements are true for you:
The person has been having hip pain for a while now that hasn't gotten better with treatment and it's been going on for 3 months or more. show original
The person has clinical findings that suggest they have impingement or a decreased range of motion, and the radiographs show that this is the case. show original
The joint-space width is more than 3 mm on all views of plain radiography and 3-dimensional computed tomography. show original
The patients who were treated with hip arthroscopy for FAI, hip dysplasia, or a combination of the two by the Principal Investigator all showed improvement. show original
People between the ages of 18 and 60 who have been diagnosed with FAI, hip dysplasia, or both. show original
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Odds of Eligibility
Unknown<50%
Be sure to apply to 2-3 other trials, as you have a low likelihood of qualifying for this one.Apply To This Trial
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Approximate Timelines

Please note that timelines for treatment and screening will vary by patient
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: varies
Reporting: Pre-treatment, Week 6, Month 3, Month 6, Month 12, Month 24
Screening: ~3 weeks
Treatment: Varies
Reporting: Pre-treatment, Week 6, Month 3, Month 6, Month 12, Month 24
This trial has approximate timelines as follows: 3 weeks for initial screening, variable treatment timelines, and reporting: Pre-treatment, Week 6, Month 3, Month 6, Month 12, Month 24.
View detailed reporting requirements
Trial Expert
Connect with the researchersHop on a 15 minute call & ask questions about:
- What options you have available- The pros & cons of this trial
- Whether you're likely to qualify- What the enrollment process looks like

Measurement Requirements

This trial is evaluating whether Treatment will improve 1 primary outcome and 6 secondary outcomes in patients with Hip Arthroscopy. Measurement will happen over the course of 1 Day.

Surgical time per technical phase measured in minutes
1 DAY
We aim to demonstrate that the use of the modified device for hip arthroscopy is fast and efficient as measured by surgical time per technical phase (i.e. arthroscopic labral repair phase and arthroscopic bone grafting phase). Arthroscopic Labral Repair Phase: During hip arthoscopy, the surgical time of the arthroscopic labral repair phase will be collected. Arthroscopic Bone Grafting Phase: During hip arthoscopy, the surgical time of the bone grafting of the hip joint phase will be collected. In this design, the technical phase recorded will either be: 1) duration of arthroscopic labral repair phase (in patients only undergoing arthroscopic labral repair) or 2) duration of arthroscopic bone grafting phase (in patients undergoing arthroscopic bone grafting).
1 DAY
Surgical costs per device used
1 DAY
Cost to use each device in surgery, measured in US dollars.
1 DAY
Patient Outcomes: Post-operative Pain
POST OPERATIVE UP TO DAY 9
Pain, as assessed via a visual analog scale. Possible scores range from 0-100, with 0 indicating no pain and 100 indicating the most severe pain and a worse outcome.
POST OPERATIVE UP TO DAY 9
Rate of Surgical Complications
UP TO 24 MONTHS
Total number of complications determined to be related to the hip arthroscopy procedure.
UP TO 24 MONTHS
Patient Outcomes: Change in Pain
PRE-TREATMENT, WEEK 6, MONTH 3, MONTH 6, MONTH 12, MONTH 24
Pain, as assessed via a visual analog scale. Possible scores range from 0-100, with 0 indicating no pain and 100 indicating the most severe pain and a worse outcome.
PRE-TREATMENT, WEEK 6, MONTH 3, MONTH 6, MONTH 12, MONTH 24
Patient Outcomes: Change in Non-Arthritic Hip Scores
PRE-TREATMENT, WEEK 6, MONTH 3, MONTH 6, MONTH 12, MONTH 24
The Non-Arthritic Hip score is a self-administered hip score measuring function and quality of life designed for use in younger patients with higher activity demands and treatment expectations than older patients with degenerative joint disease. Possible scores range from 0-4, with 0 indicating the worst and 4 indicating the best level of function and outcome for the patient.
PRE-TREATMENT, WEEK 6, MONTH 3, MONTH 6, MONTH 12, MONTH 24
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Patient Q & A Section

Please Note: These questions and answers are submitted by anonymous patients, and have not been verified by our internal team.

What are the signs of hip arthroscopy?

Arthroscopic hip procedures in patients without known hip disease are relatively infrequent and commonly require admission for observation. Clinicians should be aware of the need for observation when deciding the timing of hip arthroscopic interventions in asymptomatic patients.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Can hip arthroscopy be cured?

The authors report a dramatic effect of arthroscopy in treating refractory cases of recalcitrant hip pain in two patients who were almost exclusively osteolytic. In the authors' series, it is possible to show an improvement to or even complete recovery, even in advanced cases. We advocate early referral for arthroscopic treatment to avoid the need to perform conventional surgery.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are common treatments for hip arthroscopy?

Hip arthroscopy is performed on a regular basis for an array of conditions. Most procedures involve the removal of a small amount of cartilage. Complications are rare. We found that the type of instrument used ranged from a standard instrument to a proprietary system. The type of system, the number of systems used, and the length of the procedure for hip arthroscopy generally did not affect the length of the stay in the clinic. The use of anesthesia for hip arthroscopy was more common than previous reports had shown. The use of a specific anesthesia-based system was less common than in the past. Some hospitals use sedation for hip arthroscopy.

Anonymous Patient Answer

How many people get hip arthroscopy a year in the United States?

We found an increase in the use of hip arthroscopy from 1991 to 1999, as well as the percentage of patients receiving surgery for hip osteoarthritis. In order to ensure equitable access to hip arthroscopy, health delivery systems need to consider these current trends, because our findings suggest that surgeons treat more patients with conditions requiring hip arthroscopy than those in their practice in the past.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What causes hip arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy can be performed for a variety of indications including hip problems. However, it typically has a low success rate in treating these problems and a high likelihood of complication.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is hip arthroscopy?

It is a relatively safe, minimally invasive procedure that can be performed by arthroscopically guided cannulated or percutaneous passage. We report the successful use of hip arthroscopy for osteoarticular pathology in a large series of pediatric and adult hip arthroplasty patients.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Who should consider clinical trials for hip arthroscopy?

Patients who have a primary diagnosis of degenerative disease can be counseled regarding the potential benefits and risks of clinical trials, and are the most likely to enroll and complete clinical trials. Those who have additional coexisting risk factors, however, may be inappropriate for clinical trials and would likely be unwilling to take part.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Is treatment typically used in combination with any other treatments?

The number of treatment methods used by patients for either osteoarthritis or hip arthroscopy was high. Most treatments are used in combination with other treatments for patients who have co-morbid conditions including hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression, and rheumatoid arthritis. In a recent study, findings might explain why the cost of joint arthroscopy was the highest compared with the other joint treatments.

Anonymous Patient Answer

Is treatment safe for people?

The risk of complications and mortality after hip resurfacing remain low in the long term. At our centre up to 2.3% of cases have failed, necessitating further THA surgery. These complications pose little risk to quality of life among patients, and so the need for a further joint replacement after THA does not appear to be justified. As a result, hip resurfacing is an attractive option for patients, especially younger patients who can expect a greater and more immediate benefit and more cosmetic outcome.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What are the common side effects of treatment?

The side effects of treatment in hip arthroplasty are rare and mild if treated properly. The most common side effect is [infection] of the surgical wound which may be treated with antibiotics. There have been very few serious side effects. If treatment does not have [effect on you], you should probably go home and rest. If the problem persists or becomes worse, see your doctor again. The doctor will ask you a few questions and may recommend [treatment of more drugs or more surgeries] in order to resolve the problem.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the primary cause of hip arthroscopy?

The most common cause of hip arthroscopy was femoroacetabular impingement. The incidence of other causes was too low for us to identify any specific indications for hip arthroscopy.

Anonymous Patient Answer

What is the average age someone gets hip arthroscopy?

About 13% of individuals under 65 years old with chronic noninfectious pain in the lower extremities undergo hip arthroscopy. An age of between 65 and 94 years old should trigger a high clinical suspicion of chondromalacia patellae. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Anonymous Patient Answer
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