Reviewed by Michael Gill, B. Sc.
5 Meningitis Clinical Trials Near Me
Top Hospitals for Meningitis Clinical Trials
Image of GSK Investigational Site in Tennessee.
GSK Investigational Site
Kingsport
1Active Trials
1All Time Trials for Meningitis
2021First Meningitis Trial
Image of GSK Investigational Site in Alabama.
GSK Investigational Site
Birmingham
1Active Trials
1All Time Trials for Meningitis
2021First Meningitis Trial
Meningitis Clinical Trials by Phase of Trial
Phase 1 Meningitis Clinical Trials
1Active Meningitis Clinical Trials
1Number of Unique Treatments
0Number of Active Locations
Meningitis Clinical Trials by Age Group
Top Treatments for Meningitis Clinical Trials
Treatment Name
Active Meningitis Clinical Trials
All Time Trials for Meningitis
First Recorded Meningitis Trial
MenABCWY vaccine
2
3
2018
High number plateletpheresis donations
1
1
2020
Pneumococcal 13-valent Conjugate Vaccine
1
1
2018
Auditory Brainstem Implant
1
1
2014

What Are Meningitis Clinical Trials?

According to the CDC, Meningitis is an inflammation of the brain’s protective membranes and the spinal cord. Bacterial or viral infection, some drugs, injury, and cancer can all cause meningitis. Knowing the cause behind the disease is vital as it dictates the treatment plan.

While people worldwide are at risk of this brain disease, it is most prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa. It is less common in the U.S., but there are 2600 reported cases of meningitis in the nation every year. Meningitis can cause serious complications, due to which it is a rare but devastating disease.

Meningitis clinical trials study Central Nervous System (CNS) diseases like meningitis to uncover the causes, reasons for transmission, the efficacy of existing vaccines, and the development of new treatments to produce better patient outcomes.

Why is Meningitis Being Studied Through Clinical Trials?

There are different types of meningitis, including bacterial, viral, amebic, fungal, parasitic, and non-infectious meningitis. While each has its set of risks and complications, bacterial meningitis is deadly and can cause the death of the affected person in just a few hours.

There are approximately 2.5 million meningitis cases annually, resulting in 250,000 deaths. This is why meningitis has become a topic for research across the globe. Bacterial meningitis has a high mortality rate, as 1 in 10 people with the disease die while 1 in 5 end up with serious complications. The fatality rate can be as high as 70% without treatment, due to which meningitis clinical trials work to develop better treatments.

The economic burden of meningitis falls hard on citizens. The total costs of treating meningitis in Ghana are $101.7 per household, equivalent to two months’ salary of unpaid labor. Research intervention is required to alleviate this significant financial burden.

What Are the Types of Treatments Available for Meningitis?

The specific treatment plan will depend on the type of meningitis.

Available treatments include:

  • Intravenous antibiotics for bacterial meningitis
  • Antifungal medication for fungal meningitis
  • Antiviral medication for viral meningitis
  • Corticosteroids to reduce brain swelling
  • Over-the-counter pain relief medicines
  • IV Fluids to prevent dehydration

What Are Some Recent Breakthrough Clinical Trials for Meningitis?

There have been several landmark studies involving meningitis in recent years. Some of the most recent studies are:

2022: Pfizer conducted a clinical trial using the meningococcal vaccine that offers protection against five strains of meningitis. Success in phase 3 of the clinical trial has brought experts one step closer to attaining FDA approval and releasing an all-in-one vaccine for meningitis.

2009: A study conducted at the University of Nottingham established how the meningococcal bacteria fights and attacks the body’s natural defense mechanism to cause death from bacterial meningitis in just a few hours. There are three pathogens that target one receptor on the cerebrovascular endothelial cells responsible for protecting the brain from this disease. This finding helped open avenues for better treatments and interventions to reduce bacterial meningitis fatality rate and save lives.

Who Are Some of the Key Opinion Leaders / Researchers / Institutions Conducting Meningitis Clinical Trials Research?

Worldwide Clinical Trials is dedicated to the research of CNS diseases like Meningitis. Their clinical trials support a better understanding of the disease to pave the way for improved patient outcomes and reduced mortality rates.

Meningitis Research Foundation has carried out meningitis research since its inception in 1989. They have a donation model to receive funds for their clinical research with a singular goal of wiping out Meningitis and septicemia from the world.

About The Author

Michael Gill preview

Michael Gill - B. Sc.

First Published: October 30th, 2021

Last Reviewed: November 9th, 2022

Michael Gill holds a Bachelors of Science in Integrated Science and Mathematics from McMaster University. During his degree he devoted considerable time modeling the pharmacodynamics of promising drug candidates. Since then, he has leveraged this knowledge of the investigational new drug ecosystem to help his father navigate clinical trials for multiple myeloma, an experience which prompted him to co-found Power Life Sciences: a company that helps patients access randomized controlled trials.

References1 Eisenberg LS, Hammes Ganguly D, Martinez AS, Fisher LM, Winter ME, Glater JL, Schrader DK, Loggins J, Wilkinson EP; Los Angeles Pediatric ABI Team. Early Communication Development of Children with Auditory Brainstem Implants. J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ. 2018 Jul 1;23(3):249-260. doi: 10.1093/deafed/eny010. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/297182802 Wilkinson EP, Eisenberg LS, Krieger MD, Schwartz MS, Winter M, Glater JL, Martinez AS, Fisher LM, Shannon RV; Los Angeles Pediatric ABI Team. Initial Results of a Safety and Feasibility Study of Auditory Brainstem Implantation in Congenitally Deaf Children. Otol Neurotol. 2017 Feb;38(2):212-220. doi: 10.1097/MAO.0000000000001287. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27898605