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Duke Eye Center

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Durham, North Carolina 27701
Global Leader in Age-Related Macular Degeneration
Global Leader in Glaucoma
Conducts research for Retinal Disease
Conducts research for Macular Edema
Conducts research for Retinitis
108 reported clinical trials
15 medical researchers
Photo of Duke Eye Center in DurhamPhoto of Duke Eye Center in DurhamPhoto of Duke Eye Center in Durham

Summary

Duke Eye Center is a medical facility located in Durham, North Carolina. This center is recognized for care of Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Glaucoma, Retinal Disease, Macular Edema, Retinitis and other specialties. Duke Eye Center is involved with conducting 108 clinical trials across 106 conditions. There are 15 research doctors associated with this hospital, such as Lejla Vajzovic, MD, Sharon F Freedman, MD, Cynthia A Toth, MD, and Mays Dairi, MD.

Area of expertise

1Age-Related Macular Degeneration
Global Leader
Duke Eye Center has run 22 trials for Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Some of their research focus areas include:
Stage I
Stage II
CFI rare variant positive
2Glaucoma
Global Leader
Duke Eye Center has run 18 trials for Glaucoma.

Top PIs

Clinical Trials running at Duke Eye Center

Age-Related Macular Degeneration
Retinal Detachment
Glaucoma
Retinal Disease
Premature Birth
Retinopathy of Prematurity
Diabetic Retinopathy
Macular Edema
Convergence Insufficiency
Lazy Eye
Image of trial facility.

RGX-314 Gene Therapy

for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

RGX-314 is being developed as a novel one-time gene therapy for the treatment of neovascular (wet) age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD). Wet AMD is characterized by loss of vision due to new, leaky blood vessel formation in the retina. Wet AMD is a significant cause of vision loss in the United States, Europe and Japan, with up to 2 million people living with wet AMD in these geographies alone. Current anti-VEGF therapies have significantly changed the landscape for treatment of wet AMD, becoming the standard of care due to their ability to prevent progression of vision loss in the majority of patients. These therapies, however, require life-long intraocular injections, typically repeated every four to 12 weeks in frequency, to maintain efficacy. Due to the burden of treatment, patients often experience a decline in vision with reduced frequency of treatment over time. RGX-314 is being developed as a potential one-time treatment for wet AMD.
Recruiting2 awards Phase 32 criteria
Image of trial facility.

OCU410

for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

This is a Phase 1/2 Study to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of OCU410 for Geographic Atrophy Secondary to Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). This is a multicenter study, which will be conducted in two phases and will enroll up to a total of 63 subjects.
Recruiting1 award Phase 1 & 27 criteria
Image of trial facility.

OCU410ST

for Stargardt Disease

This is a Phase 1/2 Study to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of OCU410ST for Stargardt Disease. This is a multicenter study, which will be conducted in two phases and will enroll up to a total of 42 subjects.
Recruiting1 award Phase 1 & 2

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Frequently asked questions

What kind of research happens at Duke Eye Center?
Duke Eye Center is a medical facility located in Durham, North Carolina. This center is recognized for care of Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Glaucoma, Retinal Disease, Macular Edema, Retinitis and other specialties. Duke Eye Center is involved with conducting 108 clinical trials across 106 conditions. There are 15 research doctors associated with this hospital, such as Lejla Vajzovic, MD, Sharon F Freedman, MD, Cynthia A Toth, MD, and Mays Dairi, MD.